In this file:

 

·         ‘Dirty industries’ a strain on unsuspecting NC neighbors

Polluters continue march into brownest communities

… Cunningham quickly learned about what she calls “dirty industries” like hog and poultry farms that populate places like Lumberton…

 

·         Large hog farms unfairly blamed for poor health in communities

Re-evaluation of 2018 study emphasizes need for researchers and media to be responsible in data interpretation.

 

 

‘Dirty industries’ a strain on unsuspecting NC neighbors

Polluters continue march into brownest communities

 

by Melba Newsome, The Charlotte Post (NC)

November 20, 2021

 

When Anita Cunningham relocated from eastern Maryland to Lumberton in 2018 to help her sister care for their ailing father, she thought it was a good time to embark on a new chapter in her life. But the timing could not have been worse for the retiree.

 

Three days after she arrived, so did Hurricane Florence, a Category 4 storm with 130 mile per hour winds and more than 30 inches of rain. Downed trees from prior storms exacerbated flooding of the Lumber River, the primary drinking water source for much of Robeson County…

 

… The storm changed Cunningham from someone who never thought much about climate change or environmental justice to someone for whom these were defining issues…

 

… Cunningham is now program director of the Robeson County Cooperative for Sustainable Development, a multiracial team of organizers working to challenge the cumulative and disproportionate impact of climate change in communities of color.

 

Industry has a long, checkered history on the Lumber River. Over the last 50 years, textile plants, landfills, hazardous waste sites and industrial chicken and hog operations have greatly contributed to the pollution...

 

Chickens come home to roost

 

For decades, Robeson County might have considered itself lucky. While neighboring Sampson and Duplin counties became infamous for having more hogs than people by a factor of 40 to 1, Robeson largely escaped the industrial hog farming industry. Its luck ran out with the recent boom in poultry industrial farming…

 

License to pollute ...

 

more

https://www.thecharlottepost.com/news/2021/11/20/local-state/dirty-industries-a-strain-on-unsuspecting-north-carolina-neighbors/

 

 

Large hog farms unfairly blamed for poor health in communities

Re-evaluation of 2018 study emphasizes need for researchers and media to be responsible in data interpretation.

 

Kaushi Kanankege, Isaac Traynor, Andres Perez. University of Minnesota

via National Hog Farmer - Nov 09, 2021

 

A scientific paper published in 2018 suggested an inaccurate or misleading association between hog farms and negative health outcomes. Although the authors themselves cautioned about the limitations of the study, the study caught the attention of the media, which, in many cases, made a superficial evaluation of the study, blaming the North Carolina swine industry for higher rates of negative health outcomes in communities who live near large hog farms.

 

A deep dive into the study unveiled that those claims may have been influenced by a preconceived idea that hog farms are to be blamed for poor health in the nearby communities. In 2020, a research group at the University of Minnesota led a re-evaluation of the 2018 paper, supported by Pork Checkoff. While that work is expected to be published early next year, some early findings highlight how the earlier paper failed at delivering a responsible scientific message. The overarching conclusions indicate the 2018 work should no longer be used to blame hog farms on negative community outcomes.

 

The 2018 published study did not correctly adjust for the key social determinants of health. The H-CUP hospital and emergency visit records they used do not have a person’s median household income, education level, or their access to primary care. In the absence of these social determinants of health, researchers assumed a person’s median household income, education level, insurance coverage, smoking prevalence, and the number of primary care physicians is same as everyone else in the zip code they live.  This so called “Ecological Fallacy” affects the conclusions drawn from such erroneous statistical associations. The unfortunate reality is that based on the presence of these social determinants alone, one would already expect these communities to have higher rates of negative health outcomes. Association does not imply causation. While the 2018 publication admitted to this, media or the public may have gotten the wrong impression. The study picked a small group of five disease conditions that they claimed to have “known associations” with hog farm exposure—anemia, kidney disease, septicemia, tuberculosis (TB) and low birth weight. However, these “known associations” were not backed by evidence of causation. In the re-evaluation, the UMN group included HIV and diabetes in the analysis, two chronic disease conditions that have nothing to do with the exposure to hog farms. The UMN study showed that across the board, HIV and diabetes rates are higher in these NC communities, indicating profound and systemic health disparity in the community itself that have nothing to do with exposure to hog farms.  This is more evidence for simply a correlation between negative health outcomes a proximity to hog farms and not any sort of causation.

 

Finally, the early study compared...

 

more, including links

https://www.nationalhogfarmer.com/news/large-hog-farms-unfairly-blamed-poor-health-communities