In this file:

 

·         Implications of Prop 12 Extend Beyond California to Other States and Countries

·         Last chance to avoid havoc for pork producers

·         When pigs fly: Pork prices set to skyrocket in 2022

 

 

Implications of Prop 12 Extend Beyond California to Other States and Countries

 

Michael Formica - National Pork Producers Council

Farmscape for October 7, 2021

 

The Assistant Vice President and General Counsel with the National Pork Producers Council warns the implications for pork producers of California's Proposition 12 extend beyond that state to the rest of the United States and even other countries.

 

The National Pork Producers Council and the American Farm Bureau Federation have petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to consider the constitutionality of California’s Proposition 12, due to take effect January 1, which would ban the sale of pork from hogs that don’t meet that state's production standards.

 

Michael Formica, the Assistant Vice President and General Counsel with the National Pork Producers Council, notes under the U.S. constitution one state is not allowed to impose a tax or regulatory requirements to inhibit trade with other states or countries.

 

Clip-Michael Formica-National Pork Producers Council:

 

California was supposed to issue regulations on how to comply with Prop 12 back in September of 2019.

 

This summer they issued a proposed rule.

 

The comment period on that proposed rule closed on August 27.

 

They are not anywhere near done drafting the final rule.

 

In fact, in that comment period, the Republic of Canada even weighed in and requested that California enter into trade negotiations with the Republic of Canada because of the impact that this law will have with California trying to reach into Canada to try to regulate production in Canada.

 

Under the U.S. constitution, an individual state can't negotiate separate trade terms with a foreign country.

 

That eliminates the entire reason we exist as a country going back to 250 years.

 

more

https://www.farmscape.com/f2ShowScript.aspx?i=27662&q=Implications+of+Prop+12+Extend+Beyond+California+to+Other+States+and+Countries

 

 

Last chance to avoid havoc for pork producers

Farm groups try yet another legal effort to get Supreme Court to ban California’s arbitrary pork housing law.

 

Gary Baise, Farm Futures

Oct 06, 2021

 

The pork industry is getting its last shot at California’s Proposition 12, the arbitrary animal welfare law that in effect forces pork producers across the country to invest millions in new housing in order to sell pork into this 40 million consumer market. Californians account for 13% of the nation’s pork consumption yet import 99.87% of the pork its citizens consume.

 

The National Pork Producers Council and the American Farm Bureau Federation have filed a Writ of Certiorari in the United States Supreme Court.  California’s Proposition 12 bans the sale of pork products in California unless the sow is housed the way California wants it to be housed. The California hog industry does not exist, for all practical purposes, so the state depends almost exclusively on pork from other states. But the pork producers in other states are not investing the millions it would take to satisfy California’s arbitrary rules, which its voters agreed to in 2018. So, come Jan. 1, 2022, you will in effect see two inefficient supply chains set up to feed California’s pork needs, as California citizens, including its poorest, will pay possibly double for the popular animal protein.

 

Massive costs ...

 

Last chance ...

 

more, including links

https://www.farmprogress.com/commentary/last-chance-avoid-havoc-pork-producers

 

 

When pigs fly: Pork prices set to skyrocket in 2022

Many pork farmers are not in compliance with a California law that will come into effect in the new year.

 

Tim Blodgett, KXTV (CA)

Oct 6,2021

 

SAN DIEGO — Sausage, steaks and of course bacon are the crowd favorites here at La Jolla Gourmet Meats. Jeff Lefstein, the owner has been worried that the price of his product has skyrocketed the last few years.

 

"I don't think it can go any higher," said Lefstein. "It's going to hurt the business owners all the way across the board."

 

While most California butcher shops get their pork and beef from the Midwest, Lefstein gets his product from a farm in Brawley, California. Over the last few years and especially during the pandemic the price of meat has shot up.

 

Pork at its lowest in July of last year was $46 a pound, by August of this year it’s up to $106.

 

"I also use the Berkshire pork, which has gone up," he said. "I have to pass it on to the customers, but I don't really want to do that."

 

But Lefstein could certainly see higher prices from his California meat distributor...

 

more, including video report [2:08 min] 

https://www.abc10.com/article/life/food/when-pigs-fly-pork-prices-set-to-skyrocket-in-2022-but-why/509-09a686fb-9022-49a6-83cb-e869c101f50a