Ö The Orthodox Union wonít certify Impossible Pork as kosher, representing a break from the way that decisions about certifying kosher food are normally madeÖ†

 

 

Impossible Pork shouldn't be kosher - opinion

"We should be glad that technology has created a meaningful difference between veggie beef and veggie pork ó but if the distinction is there, the ban on the pork must be, too."

 

By David Zvi Kalman/JTA

The Jerusalem Post, Opinion (Israel) - Oct 7, 2021

 

The Orthodox Union wonít certify Impossible Pork as kosher, representing a break from the way that decisions about certifying kosher food are normally made. But as someone who studies Judaismís long relationship with technology, I would argue that it is undoubtedly the right move.

 

Since the OU first started certifying products a century ago, kosher supervision has always remained doggedly focused on objective fact-finding: Food is kosher because of whatís in it and how itís made (and, occasionally, who makes it) and thatís basically it. To get this information, modern kosher supervision agencies have built out fantastically complex global operations that keep track of complicated and constantly shifting supply chains. These systems are often incurious about almost everything not directly related to the food processing itself, including whether factory working conditions are acceptable, whether the ingredients are sustainably sourced, or whether the certified product will kill you (though politics sometimes leaks in anyway).

 

So it was unusual when the OU ó the largest certifier of kosher products in the world ó denied certification to Impossible Pork, a next-gen meat substitute, despite the fact that every ingredient in the product is kosher. The OU explained that it could not certify a product that described itself as pork.

 

The Orthodox Union wonít certify Impossible Pork as kosher, representing a break from the way that decisions about certifying kosher food are normally made. But as someone who studies Judaismís long relationship with technology, I would argue that it is undoubtedly the right move.

 

Since the OU first started certifying products a century ago, kosher supervision has always remained doggedly focused on objective fact-finding: Food is kosher because of whatís in it and how itís made (and, occasionally, who makes it) and thatís basically it. To get this information, modern kosher supervision agencies have built out fantastically complex global operations that keep track of complicated and constantly shifting supply chains. These systems are often incurious about almost everything not directly related to the food processing itself, including whether factory working conditions are acceptable, whether the ingredients are sustainably sourced, or whether the certified product will kill you (though politics sometimes leaks in anyway).

 

So it was unusual when the OU ó the largest certifier of kosher products in the world ó denied certification to Impossible Pork, a next-gen meat substitute, despite the fact that every ingredient in the product is kosher. The OU explained that it could not certify a product that described itself as pork...

 

more, including links

https://www.jpost.com/opinion/judaism-often-thrives-on-new-technologies-that-doesnt-mean-impossible-pork-should-be-kosher-681284