In this file:

 

·         The Atlantic: Where Biden Agrees With Trump

The Biden administration has been more skeptical of free trade than many predicted, and remains hawkish toward China.

 

·         FOXBusiness: Trump’s China trade deal is ‘starting point’ for Biden

US trade representative says Trump's deal 'hurt select sectors of American economy'

 

·         WSJ: Biden’s Trade Strategy That Isn’t

Trade Rep Tai offers a China policy that is Trump Lite.

 

 

Where Biden Agrees With Trump

The Biden administration has been more skeptical of free trade than many predicted, and remains hawkish toward China.

 

By Annie Lowrey, The Atlantic

Oct 5, 2021

 

“It’s unfortunate that it feels like we’ve been wrapping something with wrapping paper, in a box, and we’ve got something hidden in there,” says Katherine Tai, the United States trade representative. “It’s really complicated right now.”

 

Tai was discussing with me a long-delayed comprehensive review of American trade policy toward Beijing, something that she began formally unwrapping in a major speech at the Center for Strategic and International Studies yesterday and that she said she had been iterating in policy decisions up until now. But the need for rethinking and the imperative of caution came up over and over again in our discussion about how the new, progressive administration is approaching trade. Trade policy is changing. It’s complicated.

 

What it’s changing from is clear enough: For decades, Democratic White Houses were more pro-trade than the Democratic base, arguing that the benefits of barrier-free commerce—cheap imports, a big market for exports, and economic integration as a ballast against geopolitical conflict—far outweighed the costs. Armed with these arguments, Bill Clinton signed NAFTA, and Barack Obama negotiated the Trans-Pacific Partnership, among other deals, over the objections of labor unions and other trade skeptics.

 

But with the passage of time, it became clear that many elite Democrats had downplayed the costs of free trade. The “China shock” suppressed wages, reduced employment, and hollowed out the Rust Belt. Offshoring sapped the American economy of some of the innovation “spillover” from manufacturing. Elite Dems had also failed to grasp the political risk of allowing so much deindustrialization, and how devastating the loss of manufacturing jobs would be for a large cohort of workers without a college degree.

 

The concerns were not just domestic either. Critics argued that the country’s trade deals fell short of preventing environmental degradation, human-rights abuses, and a race to the bottom on labor standards in other countries. And both Democrats and Republicans came to view China as a threat—given its repression in Xinjiang and Hong Kong, its support for corporate espionage and theft of technology, its recalcitrance in complying with trade protocols, and many, many other issues. We are now at “an inflection point, in terms of the version of globalization” that we have currently and that we will have in the future, Tai told me.

 

Or perhaps we’re just past it...

 

more

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/10/why-bidens-china-trade-policy-remains-so-fraught/620244/

 

 

Trump’s China trade deal is ‘starting point’ for Biden

US trade representative says Trump's deal 'hurt select sectors of American economy'

 

By Jonathan Garber, FOXBusiness

Oct 4, 2021

 

The Biden administration wants to reshape former President Trump’s historic phase one trade deal with China but acknowledged the former president laid the groundwork.

 

U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai on Monday laid out her vision for trade relations between the world’s two largest economic powers, and admitted there is a zero-sum dynamic where China’s economic prosperity comes at the expense of workers and economic opportunity in the U.S.

 

"We need to take a new holistic and pragmatic approach in our relationship," Tai said during a discussion with Bill Reinsch, senior adviser and Scholl Chair in international business at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

 

She added that Trump’s trade deal is "the starting point" for talks and that the administration will "have to address where the relationship goes from the starting point."

 

Tai said China will be held to the commitments it made as part of the phase one trade deal that benefit certain industries, but that the administration plans to roll back some tariffs that have not produced strategic benefits and raised costs on Americans...

 

more

https://www.foxbusiness.com/economy/trump-china-trade-deal-starting-point-biden

 

 

Biden’s Trade Strategy That Isn’t

Trade Rep Tai offers a China policy that is Trump Lite.

 

By The Editorial Board, The Wall Street Journal (WSJ)

Oct. 4, 2021

 

Whatever the flaws of President Trump’s trade strategy with China, at least he had one. President Biden’s is indiscernible, judging from the much-anticipated but content-free remarks Monday by U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

 

Ms. Tai said that China had failed to abide by the terms of the Trump Administration’s phase one deal, which included commitments on intellectual property, technology transfer, purchases of American products, and improved market access for agriculture and financial services. In what areas specifically was China failing? She didn’t say.

 

She did promise, however, to “use the full range of tools we have, and develop new tools as needed, to defend American economic interests from harmful policies and practices.” What tools exactly she also couldn’t say, other than perhaps another Section 301 investigation and more tariffs.

 

How would Mr. Biden’s approach to China differ from Donald Trump’s ? The Biden Administration, she said, would “strengthen our alliances through bilateral, regional, and multilateral engagement.” She cited a settlement this summer with the European Union that resolved a 17-year feud over subsidies for Boeing and Airbus. That’s great, but what else? She couldn’t say...

 

more, with subscription

https://www.wsj.com/articles/bidens-trade-strategy-that-isnt-katherine-tai-us-trade-representative-china-center-for-strategic-and-international-studies-11633386034