In this file:

·         JBS, Colonial Pipeline ransomware attacks are just a fraction of what US is up against, DOJ official warns CEOs

… the malicious hacks that shut down the Colonial Pipeline and meat supply networks were just the beginning…

 

·         REvil Ransomware Gang Spill Details on US Attacks

The REvil ransomware gang is interviewed on the Telegram channel called Russian OSINT.

 

·         JBS ransomware attack a gut check for Montana ranchers

… Ranchers understood the shutdown differently, having the suffered the economic consequences of a packing plant slowdown in 2019, followed by COVID-19 stifling meat production in 2020…

 

·         CEOs need to prepare now for exponential increase in ransomware attacks, top DOJ official says

“The message needs to be to the viewers here, to the CEOs around the country, that you’ve got to be on notice of the exponential increase of these attacks,” said Lisa Monaco, deputy attorney general.

 

·         Big Beef Could Leave Food Supply Chain Vulnerable To Hackers

… JBS was quick to get things back online, but the attack raises questions about cyber security and market consolidation…

 

·         Colorado agencies, schools, companies gird themselves against cyberattacks: “Something big on the horizon”

Attack on JBS, Greeley’s largest employer, is latest in escalating series of threats

 

·         Global War on Ransomware? Hurdles Hinder the US Response

Why has the United States, believed to have the world’s greatest cyber capabilities, looked so powerless to protect its citizens from these kind of criminals operating with near impunity out of Russia and allied countries?

 

 

 

JBS, Colonial Pipeline ransomware attacks are just a fraction of what US is up against, DOJ official warns CEOs

 

Josh Meyer, USA TODAY

Jun 4 2021

 

A top Justice Department official issued an extraordinary plea to the nation’s CEOs on Friday to batten down the digital hatches against an expected onslaught of devastating ransomware attacks, saying the malicious hacks that shut down the Colonial Pipeline and meat supply networks were just the beginning.

 

“The message needs to be to the viewers here, to the CEOs around the country, that you’ve got to be on notice of the exponential increase of these attacks,” Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco told CNBC‘s Eamon Javers in her first televised appearance since joining the Justice Department in April.

 

The usually soft-spoken Monaco was emphatic in stressing that the recent high-profile hacks of Colonial Pipeline and meat processing company JBS were only a tiny sampling of the attacks against America’s critical infrastructure occurring every day.

 

“If you are not taking steps — today, right now — to understand how you can make your company more resilient, what is your plan?” Monaco said in a nine-minute interview addressed to the nation’s business leaders.

 

“If your head of security came to you today and said, ‘We’ve been hit, boss,’ what is your plan? Do you know, and does your head of security know the name and number of the FBI leader in your area who deals with ransomware attacks?” Monaco asked...

 

more, including links 

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/06/04/ransomware-attacks-like-jbs-colonial-pipeline-just-start-doj/7549468002/

 

 

REvil Ransomware Gang Spill Details on US Attacks

The REvil ransomware gang is interviewed on the Telegram channel called Russian OSINT.

 

Tom Spring, Threatpost

June 4, 2021

 

Cybercriminals behind the JBS Foods ransomware attack claim they had no intent to target United States-based firms. The group, identified as the Sodinokibi REvil ransomware gang, also said it was not afraid of being labeled a cyber-terrorist group.

 

A spokesperson for REvil shared its positions in an interview on a YouTube and Telegram channel called Russian OSINT early Friday. The validity of the REvil source cannot be independently confirmed by Threatpost, however the REvil ransomware gang has used the Russian OSINT channel several times to discuss criminal activities such as future targets, alliances and revenue.

 

The brief Russian-language interview revealed that the cybercriminal gang had originally focused its efforts on an unspecified Brazil-based entities. According to the REvil source, the gang was trying to stay away from the U.S. and U.S.-based firms.

 

Who is the REvil Group?

 

The REvil group is widely believed responsible for the cyberattack that knocked out operations at JBS Foods. The global food distributor has confirmed to the Biden administration it believes the REvil group is responsible for the attack.

 

REvil is known for both audacious attacks on the world’s biggest organizations and astronomical ransoms. In April, it tried to extort Apple just hours before its new product launch, demanding a $50 million extortion fee.

 

As of Tuesday, JBS Foods said they were able to resume shipping food from nearly all of its U.S. facilities and making progress in resuming plant operations in the U.S. and Australia. In response, the Biden administration admonished Russia.

 

“The White House is engaging directly with the Russian government on this matter and delivering the message that responsible states do not harbor ransomware criminals,” said White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre in a Sunday interview.

 

Sodinokibi REvil Ransomware Gang: Undeterred

 

... In the interview the anonymous REvil gang member said that in light of U.S. actions and posturing to retaliate for the JBS Foods attack, the group will now lift the restriction on attacking U.S. targets...

 

more, including links

https://threatpost.com/revil-spill-details-us-attacks/

 

 

JBS ransomware attack a gut check for Montana ranchers

 

Tom Lutey, Billings Gazette (MT) 

Jun 4, 2021

 

This week's ransomware attack on the world’s largest meatpacker was a gut check for Montana ranchers, still weary after slaughterhouse slowdowns during the previous two years.

 

The attack, attributed to Russian hackers by the FBI, shut down JBS meatpacking plants for a day and half, during which the U.S. meat processing fell by more than 40,000 carcasses. National news stories zeroed in on whether there would be meat shortages and, of course, higher U.S. retail prices for beef and pork. JBS accounts for 20% of the U.S. supply.

 

Ranchers understood the shutdown differently, having the suffered the economic consequences of a packing plant slowdown in 2019, followed by COVID-19 stifling meat production in 2020.

 

Sure, less processing means less meat in grocery stores, but it also means there’s less demand for cattle to slaughter. Any kink in the ability to process U.S. beef usually drives down the price that ranchers are paid.

 

“In this situation, we are monitoring it very closely. We’re concerned with the situation and these types of attacks,” said Jay Bodnar of the Montana Stockgrowers Association...

 

more

https://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/jbs-ransomware-attack-a-gut-check-for-montana-ranchers/article_f285654f-ec4b-523c-abd3-c54c14703549.html

 

 

CEOs need to prepare now for exponential increase in ransomware attacks, top DOJ official says

 

o   A top Justice Department official warned that U.S. business leaders need to do more to prepare for an onslaught of ransomware attacks being carried out by states and criminal groups overseas.

o   “The message needs to be to the viewers here, to the CEOs around the country, that you’ve got to be on notice of the exponential increase of these attacks,” said Lisa Monaco, deputy attorney general.

 

Tucker Higgins, CNBC

Jun 4 2021

 

A top Justice Department official warned Friday that U.S. business leaders need to do more to prepare for an onslaught of ransomware attacks being carried out by overseas states and criminal groups.

 

“The message needs to be to the viewers here, to the CEOs around the country, that you’ve got to be on notice of the exponential increase of these attacks,” Lisa Monaco, deputy attorney general, told CNBC’s Eamon Javers in her first televised interview since joining the Justice Department in April.

 

Monaco, who has spearheaded the DOJ’s efforts to defend against cyberattacks, said the recent high-profile hacks of Colonial Pipeline and meat processing company JBS were reflective of the sorts of intrusions taking place every day.

 

“If you are not taking steps — today, right now — to understand how you can make your company more resilient, what is your plan?” Monaco said, addressing business leaders. “If your head of security came to you today and said, ‘We’ve been hit, boss,’ what is your plan? Do you know, and does your head of security know the name and number of the FBI leader in your area who deals with ransomware attacks? These are steps that you’ve got to be taking, right now — today — to make yourselves more resilient.”

 

Monaco, who was a homeland security advisor to former President Barack Obama, on Thursday issued a memo to the nation’s federal prosecutors requiring the centralization of reporting of ransomware attacks. Shortly after joining the DOJ, she initiated a 120-day review of cybersecurity challenges the department faces...

 

more

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/06/04/ceos-need-to-prepare-for-increase-in-ransomware-attacks-doj-official.html

 

 

Big Beef Could Leave Food Supply Chain Vulnerable To Hackers

 

KUNR (NV)

Jun 5, 2021

 

A massive hacking incident against beef processing giant JBS caused an estimated 20% of U.S. beef packing plants to grind to a halt earlier this week. JBS was quick to get things back online, but the attack raises questions about cyber security and market consolidation.

 

Cattle ranchers across the region have expressed concerns about certain companies getting too much power and affecting too much of the market. According to USDA estimates, only four companies control about 80% of the beef processing market.

 

“I think there’s a concern in the cattle industry of putting all your eggs in just too few baskets,” said Eric Belasco, an agricultural economics professor at Montana State University.

 

Belasco added that streamlined processes can be good for ranchers, but disruptions aren’t.

 

“While they do enjoy economies of scale delivering some of these products to consumers at lower prices. I think also the volatility from having this concentration is a growing concern,” he said.

 

Beyond that, lawmakers like Montana Sen. Jon Tester are calling for renewed investigations into the largest beef processors, including JBS, for price fixing during the chaos of the pandemic. That is, allegations the companies used plant slowdowns to pay ranchers even less and made more off of sales.

 

Tester said in a statement...

 

more, including links

https://www.kunr.org/post/big-beef-could-leave-food-supply-chain-vulnerable-hackers#stream/0

 

 

Colorado agencies, schools, companies gird themselves against cyberattacks: “Something big on the horizon”

Attack on JBS, Greeley’s largest employer, is latest in escalating series of threats

 

By Sam Tabachnik and Elizabeth Hernandez, The Denver Post

June 5, 2021

 

Data breaches. The dark web. Ransom demands.

 

While these phrases may seem like abstract plot points in a cable TV crime-solving show, Colorado businesses and enterprises of all stripes are learning about the increasingly serious threat of cybercrime as more continue to fall victim to malicious hackers.

 

“Every organization is vulnerable and every organization needs to be vigilant,” said Ken McConnellogue, spokesman for the University of Colorado system, which refused to pay a $17 million ransom after the theft of student data earlier this year.

 

Brazil’s JBS, the world’s largest meat supplier and the biggest employer in Greeley, faced a ransomware attack last weekend that shut down production at its beef plants across the world. In Greeley, home to JBS’s largest U.S. beef plant, multiple shifts were canceled this week due to the cyberattack, union officials said.

 

The attack on the meat processing giant is one of the latest and most high-profile examples of the escalating cyberattacks in Colorado and nationwide that have hit gas pipelines, universities, transportation agencies, and food and beverage suppliers.

 

While ransomware can target anyone, the FBI says it’s particularly worried about city, state and tribal government networks, as well as critical infrastructure such as police, fire and hospitals...

 

Being ready for an attack ...

 

Holding data for ransom ...

 

more, including links   

https://www.denverpost.com/2021/06/05/ransomware-jbs-colorado-cyberattacks/

 

 

Global War on Ransomware? Hurdles Hinder the US Response

 

Associated Press

via WTTW (IL) - June 5, 2021

 

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Foreign keyboard criminals with scant fear of repercussions have paralyzed U.S. schools and hospitals, leaked highly sensitive police files, triggered fuel shortages and, most recently, threatened global food supply chains.

 

The escalating havoc caused by ransomware gangs raises an obvious question: Why has the United States, believed to have the world’s greatest cyber capabilities, looked so powerless to protect its citizens from these kind of criminals operating with near impunity out of Russia and allied countries?

 

The answer is that there are numerous technological, legal and diplomatic hurdles to going after ransomware gangs. Until recently, it just hasn’t been a high priority for the U.S. government.

 

That has changed as the problem has grown well beyond an economic nuisance. President Joe Biden intends to confront Russia’s leader, Vladimir Putin, about Moscow’s harboring of ransomware criminals when the two men meet in Europe later this month. The Biden administration has also promised to boost defenses against attacks, improve efforts to prosecute those responsible and build diplomatic alliances to pressure countries that harbor ransomware gangs.

 

Calls are growing for the administration to direct U.S. intelligence agencies and the military to attack ransomware gangs’ technical infrastructure used for hacking, posting sensitive victim data on the dark web and storing digital currency payouts...

 

more

https://news.wttw.com/2021/06/05/global-war-ransomware-hurdles-hinder-us-response