Key to zero-carbon emissions beef is the feedlot, not the paddock, says scientist

 

         One research scientist says beef from intensive feedlots produce up to 20 per cent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than grass-fed cattle

         Stephen Wiedemann says that enteric methane produced when cattle burp was the biggest source of carbon for the beef industry, accounting for 80 to 90 per cent of emissions

         Harvest Road's general manager of agriculture said he believed the market would eventually demand carbon-neutral beef

 

By Sean Murphy, Landline

via ABC News Australia - Apr 30, 2021

 

Feedlots may be key to the Australian beef industry achieving its goal of zero carbon emissions by 2030.

 

Research scientist Stephen Wiedemann claims beef from intensive feedlots produces up to 20 per cent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than grass-fed cattle.

 

Dr Wiedemann has been gathering data on Australia's beef herd since 1980.

 

"This is a really interesting and to a lot of people a counterintuitive type of point, but our research has consistently shown lower emissions from feedlot finished cattle than from grass-finished cattle," Dr Wiedemann said.

 

"There's one simple reason for that at the end of the day you're turning off those cattle sooner at the same weight or even heavier weights than they would have been off the grass. So, you're reducing their lifetime and you're reducing their lifetime emissions

 

Dr Wiedemann said enteric methane produced when cattle burp was the biggest source of carbon for the beef industry, accounting for 80 to 90 per cent of emissions.

 

The balance of carbon came from fossil fuels burned for transport and energy, and manure, which was also high in methane.

 

Understanding where the carbon is ...

 

Emissions cut ...

 

Feedlots have a story to tell ...

 

more

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-01/zero-carbon-beef-a-lot-about-feeding/100100602