In this file:

 

·         COVID tests lead to discovery of pig-based flu viruses

·         Manitoba Pork Issues Statement On Human Case Of H1N1v & H1N2v

 

 

COVID tests lead to discovery of pig-based flu viruses

Provincial health and veterinary officials say there appears to be no risk to other humans, pigs don't appear to have the disease and pork carries no risk of infection for humans.

 

By Ed White, The Western Producer 

April 30, 2021

 

Mass COVID-19 testing has caught two pig-based influenza variants in Manitobans.

 

Provincial health and veterinary officials say there appears to be no risk to other humans, pigs don’t appear to have the disease and pork carries no risk of infection for humans.

 

The cases were found in early April and there have been none since.

 

Manitoba’s hog industry is also unaffected by the cases of H1N1 and H1N2, other than for the two individuals infected and for people who undertook extra health testing of pigs close to the people affected.

 

“It’s an isolated case,” Dr. Scott Zaari, Manitoba’s chief veterinary officer, said April 30, about one of the two cases.

 

One of the people had direct interaction with pigs, while the other had only indirect contact. Provincial officials would not offer details on where the people were apparently infected or what role they play in the hog farming industry.

 

Dr. Brent Roussin, Manitoba’s chief public health officer, said the cases were probably caught because of increased public concerns over flu-like symptoms due to the COVID-19 pandemic...

 

more

https://www.producer.com/news/covid-tests-lead-to-discovery-of-pig-based-flu-viruses/

 

 

Manitoba Pork Issues Statement On Human Case Of H1N1v & H1N2v

 

by Cory Knutt, Discover Westman (CAN)

29 April 2021

 

Manitoba Pork issued the following statement Friday:

 

Today, the Chief Public Health Officer and the Chief Veterinary Officer for the Province of Manitoba have announced a positive human case of both H1N1v and H1N2v. These cases are separate of one another and are not related. There is no evidence at this time of sustained person-to-person transfer and no increased risk to the public.

 

H1N1 is a subtype of influenza A, with many strains that regularly circulate in both humans and pigs. The strain identified is rarely seen in people. The individual experienced only mild clinical signs and has since recovered with no known transmission to other individuals. H1N1 cases are not uncommon. For example, H1N1 was the dominant subtype of influenza cases in 2019-2020 according to Health Canada.

 

The individual confirmed with H1N2v experienced only mild clinical signs and has since recovered with no known transmission to other individuals. The spread of infection of H1N2 between humans is very rare. This represents only the second case of H1N2v identified in Canada with the first having been identified last year in Alberta. While H1N2 is rare in humans, it is not an uncommon virus among swine herds in North America, with about 30 cases reported in pigs each quarter across Western Canada. Since 2005, fewer than 30 cases have been reported in humans around the world.

 

H1N1 and H1N2 are not food-borne illnesses. Neither virus can be transmitted by eating pork. Consumers can be assured that there is no risk associated with keeping pork on their menus.

 

Hog farmers have been proactively engaged in influenza surveillance for many years...

 

more

https://discoverwestman.com/ag-news/manitoba-pork-issues-statement-on-human-case-of-h1n1v-h1n2v