… Widely used in refrigeration as well as residential and commercial air conditioning and heat pumps, HFCs were developed as a substitute for chemicals that depleted the Earth’s protective ozone layer… 

 

 

Biden administration to propose first rule requiring cut in climate pollutants

The new Environmental Protection Agency rule targets hydrofluorocarbons, greenhouse gases that are thousands of times more powerful than carbon dioxide

 

By Juliet Eilperin and Dino Grandoni, The Washington Post

May 3, 2021

 

The Environmental Protection Agency will propose a rule Monday aimed at sharply cutting the use and production of a class of powerful greenhouse gases used widely in refrigeration and air conditioning. The proposal marks the first time President Biden’s administration has used the power of the federal government to mandate a cut in climate pollution.

 

Unlike many of the administration’s other climate initiatives, there’s broad bipartisan support for curbing hydrofluorocarbons, pollutants thousands of times more potent than carbon dioxide at warming the planet. Congress agreed at the end of last year to slash the super-pollutants by 85 percent over the next 15 years as part of a broader omnibus bill.

 

Altogether, a global phasing down of hydrofluorocarbons, also known as HFCs, is projected to avert up to 0.5 degree Celsius (0.9 degrees Fahrenheit) of warming by the end of the century.

 

Widely used in refrigeration as well as residential and commercial air conditioning and heat pumps, HFCs were developed as a substitute for chemicals that depleted the Earth’s protective ozone layer. But their heat-trapping properties have helped further fuel rising temperatures...

 

... A number of large supermarket chains — including Walmart and Whole Foods, which is owned by Amazon — have pledged to phase out the chemicals in their operations...

 

... there is still widespread leakage of these climate super-pollutants in the commercial food sector. The industry estimates that every year, supermarkets lose an average of 25 percent of their refrigerant charge...

 

more, including links   

https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2021/05/03/epa-climate-hfcs/