In this file:

 

         Bidenís Post-Trump Honeymoon

Heís riding the end of the pandemic to pass a radical agenda.

 

         America Voted for a Rest, Not a Revolution

Elected as Not Trump, Biden aspires to be the second coming of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

 

 

Bidenís Post-Trump Honeymoon

Heís riding the end of the pandemic to pass a radical agenda.

 

By The Editorial Board, The Wall Street Journal (WSJ)

April 27, 2021

 

When President Biden addresses Congress Wednesday evening, he wonít salute his predecessor but he should. Donald Trumpís raucous Presidency has let the Democrat sell a radical agenda in the soothing tones of a return to normal, while the vaccine project known as Operation Warp Speed has teed up the end of the pandemic and an economic revival. This is the main story of Mr. Bidenís first 100 days.

 

***

 

Mr. Biden won the White House as the anti-Trump, and he has continued to benefit from that persona in his first months. Half the country is relieved merely to have a President who isnít constantly brawling on TV in their living rooms. Whether by design, or necessity due to his reduced capacities, the decision to husband Mr. Bidenís public appearances has been shrewd. Heís the calm after the four-year Trump storm.

 

The Democrat has also been lucky in timing, as he took the oath of office as the Covid-19 vaccines were coming online. The White House pretense that it inherited a Covid mess is nonsense. The vaccine production was pre-planned. While some state rollouts were bumpy when there was more vaccine demand than supply, the main job of the Administration was to accelerate the distribution that was already underway.

 

The same goes for the economy, which has been growing since last July, and its acceleration was inevitable as people returned to normal commercial and social life. As New York, Michigan and California have followed the leadership of Texas and Florida in lifting their lockdowns, the inevitable post-pandemic boom has arrived. The same would have happened if Mr. Trump had won.

 

This not to begrudge Mr. Biden his good political fortune. Any successful President needs some luck, and any politician will take credit for it. With so much wind at his back, Mr. Biden could be fulfilling his campaign pledge to unify the country and govern in a bipartisan fashion.

 

Yet the striking fact of his first three months is that he has done the opposite. He has sought to govern from the left, pressing the most progressive domestic agenda in decades with the narrowest Democratic majorities in Congress. Heís governed like Bernie Sanders in a hurry despite a 36-year Senate career with no notable causes or ideas. No less than Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says Mr. Biden has ďdefinitely exceeded expectations that progressives had.Ē

 

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https://www.wsj.com/articles/bidens-post-trump-honeymoon-11619564017

 

 

America Voted for a Rest, Not a Revolution

Elected as Not Trump, Biden aspires to be the second coming of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

 

By Gerard Baker, Opinion, The Wall Street Journal (WSJ)

April 26, 2021

 

Joe Biden aspires to be the second coming of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, so short of his showing up to work in a wheelchair and sucking on a cigarette holder, the first hundred days, which he marks this week, will serve as the most symbolic reminder of the presidentís sense of historic purpose.

 

The ritual observation of the passage of FDRís calendrical contrivance promises to be even more turgid than usual this year. President Bidenís first address to a joint session of Congress, which he delivers on Wednesday, will come with special solemnity. We will be reminded that delivering the nation from the baleful legacy of a one-term Republican in the midst of a national crisis with an urgent flurry of executive and legislative initiatives is what Democrats do.

 

We can leave to future historians whether the creation of the White House Gender Policy Council will prove as consequential as that of the Tennessee Valley Authority. To be fair, different times pose different challenges. Eleanor at least would surely approve. Perhaps sheís having fireside chats with Dr. Jill the way she used to with Hillary Clinton.

 

FDR had a famously complaisant press covering him, but even he might have blanched at the deference shown by Mr. Bidenís media guardians. Newspapers did eventually rouse themselves to object that the 1937 effort to pack the Supreme Court might be constitutionally problematic. Todayís friendly stenographers donít see the problem at all, and faithfully convey the White House line that the same idea is a much-needed ďreform.Ē

 

Given the revisionist climate we live in, though, Mr. Biden might not want to overdo the historical parallels with a white, male Democrat of the 1930s. We can only speculate on how FDR might have fared in an unconscious-bias training session led by a modern diversity, equity and inclusion officer, but back in the 1930s the Jim Crow rules enforced by his fellow Democrats meant billy clubs, beatings and lynchings, not a slight reduction in the number of early-voting drop boxes...

 

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https://www.wsj.com/articles/america-voted-for-a-rest-not-a-revolution-11619455434