Scientists grow human muscles in pig embryos for the first time

 

Sarah Wells, Inverse

Mar 30, 2021

 

Some parts of the human body are in a state of constant regeneration. Liver cells, for example, are replaced every 300 to 500 days. Fingernails grow every day.

 

But this aptitude rapidly declines when it comes to replacing essential internal parts of our bodies, ranging from kidneys to muscle tissue.

 

While organ transplant lists are far from perfect, it is possible to successfully swap one human heart for another thanks to post-mortem organ donations. But the same canít be said of those suffering from volumetric muscle loss (VML). This is when skeletal muscle tissue has been damaged through injury or illness beyond the point of repair and is incompatible with grafts post-mortem muscle tissue.

 

However, this problem could soon be solved by unprecedented human-pig chimeras being developed by the University of Minnesota.

 

Chimeras, named after the mythical lion-goat-serpent monster, are organisms or tissue that include at least two different sets of DNA. Interspecies chimeras have a mixture of genes from parent organisms representing different species. In this case, the chimera is a mixture of human and pig.

 

The study detailing these new chimeras was published Monday in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering...

 

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https://www.inverse.com/innovation/human-pig-chimeras-future-of-organ-transplant