In this file:

 

·         President Trump Unveils Plan To Make The Treatment He Received For COVID-19 Available To Seniors

... “‘We’re taking care of our seniors,” he stated. “…you’re gonna get the same medicine, you’re gonna get it free, no charge and we’re going to get it to you soon”...

 

·         Coronavirus: COVID-19 survivors may have protective antibodies for up to four months, study suggests

The study looks at how long immunity lasts in survivors and whether those infected will develop lasting protection from the virus.

 

 

President Trump Unveils Plan To Make The Treatment He Received For COVID-19 Available To Seniors

 

OAN Newsroom

October 9, 2020

 

President Trump recently extended a message to the nation’s senior citizens, promising to make available to them the very same treatment he received for COVID-19.

 

The President’s address, delivered from the South Lawn of the White House on Thursday, opened up with an expression of solidarity, where he spoke of his shared experience as a fellow member of the group designated as “at-risk” by medical professionals.

 

Yet once he tested positive for the virus, the President stated he made a quick recovery thanks to the cutting edge medical care he received at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Additionally, he announced that therapy will soon be accessible to seniors at no charge.

 

“But we have medicines right now and I call them a cure,” he stated. “…we’re gonna make them available immediately, we have an Emergency Use Authorization that I want to get signed immediately.”

 

An Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) allows the FDA to fast-track the deployment of medical resources during times of national emergency when adhering to a standard timeline has the potential to put lives in peril.

 

The mechanism has been successfully employed by the Trump administration since the beginning of the pandemic with the FDA issuing the original version of its declaration under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act for medical countermeasures against COVID-19 in early February. This was a full month before the World Health Organization had even designated the disease as a pandemic...

 

... “‘We’re taking care of our seniors,” he stated. “…you’re gonna get the same medicine, you’re gonna get it free, no charge and we’re going to get it to you soon”...

 

more

https://www.oann.com/president-trump-unveils-plan-to-make-the-treatment-he-received-for-covid-19-available-to-seniors/

 

 

Coronavirus: COVID-19 survivors may have protective antibodies for up to four months, study suggests

The study looks at how long immunity lasts in survivors and whether those infected will develop lasting protection from the virus.

 

Lucia Binding, Sky News (UK)

12 October 2020

 

People who recover from COVID-19 may have protective antibodies for up to four months, according to a new study.

 

Researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts General Hospital aimed to determine how long immunity lasts in coronavirus survivors, and whether those infected with COVID-19 will develop lasting protection from the virus.

 

The study, published in Science Immunology, also focused on the body's immune response to COVID-19 and the team's findings suggested antibodies can be an accurate tool for tracking the spread of the infection in the community.

 

The study found that the immune system produces antibodies in response to SARS-Cov-2 - the virus that causes COVID-19.

 

However, Dr Richelle Charles, senior author of the paper, said there is a "big knowledge gap" in terms of how long these antibody responses last.

 

Blood samples were obtained from 343 patients with COVID-19, most of whom had severe cases, up to four months after the patient's symptoms emerged.

 

The results were compared with blood samples of more than 1,500 people before the pandemic.

 

Levels of an antibody called immunoglobulin G (IgG) remained elevated in infected patients for up to four months and was linked with the presence of protective neutralising antibodies - which also demonstrated little decrease in activity over time, researchers said.

 

"That means that people are very likely protected for that period of time. We showed that key antibody responses to COVID-19 do persist," Dr Charles told The Harvard Gazette.

 

Measuring IgG was highly accurate in identifying infected patients who had COVID-19 symptoms for at least 14 days, the researchers found.

 

The study also found that people infected with SARS-CoV-2 had immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) - the first antibody the body makes when it fights a new infection - responses that were relatively short-lived, falling to low levels within about two and a half months or less, on average.

 

"We can say now that if a patient has IgA and IgM responses, they were likely infected with the virus within the last two months," said Dr Charles.

 

Dr Jason Harris, co-senior author of the study, explained that knowing the duration of the immune response of these antibodies could help scientists obtain more accurate data about the spread of SARS-CoV-2...

 

more

https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus-covid-19-survivors-may-have-protective-antibodies-for-up-to-four-months-study-suggests-12102310