In this file:

 

·         Walmart cuts corporate roles as it merges online, store businesses

    Walmart said it’s eliminating some corporate roles as it merges its online and store businesses in the U.S.

    The company said it would share more details after notifying employees.

    The big-box retailer has had a surge of sales during the pandemic, but its labor costs have risen, too.

 

·         Analysis: Walmart among retailers bracing for tumultuous back-to-school season

A Deloitte survey of 1,200 U.S. parents in July found they plan to spend 18% less on apparel and 28% more on technology.

 

 

 

Walmart cuts corporate roles as it merges online, store businesses

 

    Walmart said it’s eliminating some corporate roles as it merges its online and store businesses in the U.S.

    The company said it would share more details after notifying employees.

    The big-box retailer has had a surge of sales during the pandemic, but its labor costs have risen, too.

 

Melissa Repko, CNBC 

Jul 30 2020

 

Walmart is cutting corporate roles across the company as it merges its online and store businesses in the U.S.

 

The country’s largest retailer confirmed Thursday that it is eliminating some jobs in its back offices — but would not say how many workers will lose their jobs.

 

The layoffs were first reported by Bloomberg. Citing people familiar with the matter, the report said Walmart has laid off hundreds of corporate employees across store planning, logistics and real estate units.

 

“We are continuing on our journey to create an omnichannel organization within our Walmart U.S. business and we’re making some additional changes this week,” Walmart spokeswoman Jami Lamontagne told CNBC.

 

She said the company will share more details after notifying employees.

 

Walmart is trying to turn its e-commerce business into a profitable one. It’s made a series of organizational changes and announcements in recent months. In late February, the company merged its buyer teams on the store and online side to decrease conflicts over the pricing of products online and in-store. It struck deals with secondhand apparel and accessories site ThredUp in May and with Shopify in June to expand the assortment of goods and add new brands to its website.

 

It announced in May that it would wind down its Jet.com brand. And it’s expected to launch a subscription-based service called Walmart+ to better compete with Amazon Prime.

 

Online sales have become even more crucial for the retailer during the pandemic. Walmart’s e-commerce sales in the U.S. shot up by 74% in the first quarter, which ended April 30.

 

In recent months...

 

more, including links 

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/07/30/walmart-cuts-hundreds-of-corporate-roles-report-says.html

 

 

Analysis: Walmart among retailers bracing for tumultuous back-to-school season

A Deloitte survey of 1,200 U.S. parents in July found they plan to spend 18% less on apparel and 28% more on technology.

 

By: Melissa Fares and Nivedita Balu, Reuters

via The Dickinson Press (ND) - Jul 30th 2020

 

As more school districts roll back their reopening plans to curb the spread of coronavirus, major retailers in the United States are aggressively discounting back-to-school backpacks and uniforms and airing new advertisements featuring students happily taking classes at home.

 

Walmart, which created a mask section in its "back to school clothing" department online, has begun airing a commercial showing a boy attending school, alone, in a mask one day, then taking class online in his bedroom the next day. Another ad shows a mom packing up a backpack with school supplies for her daughter to use while performing a chemistry experiment in the backyard.

 

Schools in Los Angeles and San Diego – California's two largest public-school districts - are set to resume classes online only in August.

 

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled a plan for reopening schools in September with a "blended learning" schedule that would have students alternating between classrooms and their homes.

 

U.S. laptop sales may boom as parents anticipate the COVID-19 pandemic will keep at least some classes online, retailers say, citing survey data. But spending on clothing is likely to take a hit. A Deloitte survey of 1,200 U.S. parents in July found they plan to spend 18% less on apparel and 28% more on technology.

 

Alycia Zimmerman, 38, a Brooklyn, N.Y., mother of a 3- and a 5-year-old, said she intends to buy fewer outfits for her kids this fall. “There will be a lot of time spent at home when I don’t care if they’re wearing the same thing four days in a row - and they don’t have to look presentable,” she said.

 

Several retailers -- from department store operators Macy’s, Nordstrom to discount stores like Ross Stores -- canceled summer orders from suppliers at the onset of COVID-19.

 

To better manage inventory, Jane Elfers, chief executive of Children’s Place said on a June 11 earnings call that the Secaucus, N.J.-based company had invested in services like ship-from-store.

 

Several American makers of uniforms applied for aid from the United States Paycheck Protection Program, which injected about $521.4 billion in taxpayer cash to businesses impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic...

 

more

https://www.thedickinsonpress.com/news/education/6581828-Analysis-Walmart-among-retailers-bracing-for-tumultuous-back-to-school-season