Integrity Beef Sustainability Pilot Project Completes Two-Year Study

 

Drovers News Source

July 29, 2020

 

The Integrity Beef Sustainability Pilot Project, the first U.S. Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (USRSB) supported program to test USRSB tools and resources, completed its innovative two-year study to validate, track and trace beef sustainability claims across all segments of the supply chain.

 

The study applied the U.S. Beef Industry Sustainability Framework to 36 ranches, 92,577 acres of land, and 3.5 million lbs. of beef raised, processed, and served in the United States. The pilot project determined the scalability of the Framework, a comprehensive set of beef sustainability indicators, metrics and guidance material for every segment of the supply chain.

 

Industry leaders who came together on the pilot were Noble Research Institute, Integrity Beef Alliance, Beef Marketing Group, Tyson Foods, Golden State Foods, and McDonald’s Corporation. The results of the pilot are summarized in the Integrity Beef Sustainability Pilot Project Summary Report.

 

The self-assessment developed through the pilot along with the U.S. Beef Industry Sustainability Framework are now being incorporated into the USRSB’s interactive educational modules for each segment of the industry, which will be available to the public free of charge by the end of 2021. These interactive tools will be the basis for trainings and seminars across the country to further implement the Framework at scale.

 

“This pilot successfully tracked animals from birth to the beef patties at the restaurants,” said Dr. Wayne Morgan, corporate vice president of Golden State Foods and current USRSB chair. “Providing information up and down the supply chain is valuable when identifying opportunities to improve, and ultimately allows us to answer the questions our customers are asking.”

 

Project managers worked with ranchers and feedyards to...

 

more

https://www.drovers.com/article/integrity-beef-sustainability-pilot-project-completes-two-year-study