The coronavirus isn’t alive. That’s why it’s so hard to kill.

The science behind what makes this coronavirus so sneaky, deadly and difficult to defeat

 

By Sarah Kaplan, William Wan and Joel Achenbach, The Washington Post 

March 23, 2020

 

Viruses have spent billions of years perfecting the art of surviving without living — a frighteningly effective strategy that makes them a potent threat in today’s world.

 

That’s especially true of the deadly new coronavirus that has brought global society to a screeching halt. It’s little more than a packet of genetic material surrounded by a spiky protein shell one-thousandth the width of an eyelash, and leads such a zombielike existence that it’s barely considered a living organism.

 

But as soon as it gets into a human airway, the virus hijacks our cells to create millions more versions of itself.

 

There is a certain evil genius to how this coronavirus pathogen works: It finds easy purchase in humans without them knowing. Before its first host even develops symptoms, it is already spreading its replicas everywhere, moving onto its next victim. It is powerfully deadly in some but mild enough in others to escape containment. And, for now, we have no way of stopping it.

 

As researchers race to develop drugs and vaccines for the disease that has already sickened 350,000 and killed more than 15,000 people, and counting, this is a scientific portrait of what they are up against.

 

‘Between chemistry and biology’ ...

 

The search for weapons ...

 

more, including links 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2020/03/23/coronavirus-isnt-alive-thats-why-its-so-hard-kill/