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·         Study suggests age-related muscle loss reduces by more balanced protein diet

… But just eating more protein is not enough, though - older people also need to spread that intake evenly across all their meals to ensure they maximise the benefits of protein for muscle mass… 

 

·         Women who eat more protein may have a lower risk of developing a heart flutter

... "Women with the lowest protein intake -- which was roughly equivalent to the current recommended daily amount of protein in the US -- had the highest incidence of AFib, and eating a little more was protective, even after taking into account other factors that can predispose someone to develop AFib," said Daniel Gerber, MD, the study's lead author... women don't have to add that much more protein into their diets to reap the benefits…

 

·         High-Protein Low-Fat Diet Of Parents May Reduce The Risk Of Lifestyle Diseases Like Diabetes In Kids: Study

Prenatal factors such as stress and improper diet may increase the risk of lifestyle-related diseases like diabetes in children when they reach adulthood.

 

 

 

Study suggests age-related muscle loss reduces by more balanced protein diet

 

ANI

via Yahoo News - 21 March 2020

 

Birmingham [UK], Mar 21 (ANI): While a well-balanced diet is advised to maintain a healthy body and mind, the quantity of the balanced protein in the diet is equally important. In a new study, researchers have found that consuming a more balanced protein diet can help in the reduction of various age-related loss of muscles.

 

The study was developed in the journal - Frontiers in Exercise and Sports Nutrition.

 

Eating more protein at breakfast or lunchtime could help older people maintain muscle mass with advancing age - but research finds that most people eat proteins fairly unevenly throughout the day.

 

The body's mechanisms for producing new muscle require regular stimulation to function efficiently - this stimulation happens when we eat protein. The mechanisms are less efficient in older people, so they need to eat more protein to get the same response as younger people.

 

But just eating more protein is not enough, though - older people also need to spread that intake evenly across all their meals to ensure they maximise the benefits of protein for muscle mass.

 

Researchers in the School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Birmingham, studied the dietary intake of young, middle-aged and old-aged individuals with a particular focus on the amount, pattern and source of protein consumed.

 

Their results showed that, while the majority of individuals across all three groups met or exceeded current national guidelines (RDA) for protein intake, the protein intake and distribution across daily meals and snacks were very varied.

 

The study involved 120 participants divided into three age groups. In the first, participants had an average age of 23; in the second an average age of 51; and in the third an average age of 77. All participants were asked to complete a food diary over a three-day period, weighing out every single food item consumed.

 

Researchers looked for patterns in the dietary behaviour of participants. In particular, they evaluated the protein intake across the different age groups and found 18 different patterns of protein intake throughout the day, showing a wide variety of eating habits.

 

Most noticeably, the team found that old people, compared to young and middle-aged individuals, people were more likely to eat a lower-quality protein source, such as bread, at lunchtime.The results offer compelling evidence for revised nutritional guidelines that could help older people adopt habits that spread the consumption of good quality proteins across all their meals.

 

"We know that older people show a blunted response to muscle building when consuming a certain amount of protein. Therefore, older individuals need to eat more protein to get the same muscle-building response as younger and middle-aged people," said lead researcher Dr Benoit Smeuninx.

 

"Another way to help muscles make better use of dietary protein is to perform regular exercise," added Smeuninx...

 

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https://in.news.yahoo.com/study-suggests-age-related-muscle-loss-reduces-more-121058810.html

 

 

Women who eat more protein may have a lower risk of developing a heart flutter

 

AFP Relax News

via Yahoo News - March 20, 2020

 

New US research has found that eating more than the recommended daily amount of protein could help women reduce their risk of a heart condition called atrial fibrillation (AFib), also referred to as a heart flutter.

 

Carried out by researchers at Stanford University, the new study looked at over 99,000 postmenopausal women who were all free of AFib at the beginning of the study.

 

The women were asked to complete food questionnaires as well as provide urine samples to confirm how much protein they ate. Using this data, the researchers could then classify the women into four groups based on their protein intake (<58 g/day, 58-66 g/day, 66-74 g/day and >74 g/day) before following the participants for an average of nearly ten years.

 

The findings, due to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session together with World Congress of Cardiology in March, showed that the women who ate 58 to 74 grams of protein a day were five to eight percent less likely to develop AFib, compared to the women who ate less protein.

 

The findings still held true even after the researchers had taken into account other possible risk factors such as body mass index, physical activity, tobacco and alcohol use and high blood pressure.

 

However, there appeared to be no statistically significant benefit to eating more than 74 grams of protein a day.

 

Current US guidelines recommend consuming 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight, which for a 140-pound person is about 51 grams per day. In the UK, the recommendation is even lower at 0.75 grams of protein per kilogram daily.

 

"Women with the lowest protein intake -- which was roughly equivalent to the current recommended daily amount of protein in the US -- had the highest incidence of AFib, and eating a little more was protective, even after taking into account other factors that can predispose someone to develop AFib," said Daniel Gerber, MD, the study's lead author. "This modifiable risk factor for AFib may be a fairly easy way for women to potentially lower their risk."

 

Gerber also added that women don't have to add that much more protein into their diets to reap the benefits…

 

more

https://news.yahoo.com/women-eat-more-protein-may-lower-risk-developing-142158223.html

 

 

High-Protein Low-Fat Diet Of Parents May Reduce The Risk Of Lifestyle Diseases Like Diabetes In Kids: Study

Prenatal factors such as stress and improper diet may increase the risk of lifestyle-related diseases like diabetes in children when they reach adulthood.

 

Edited by Neha Grover, NDTV Food (India)

March 21, 2020

 

Parents are always advised to eat healthy for better health of their offspring. Certain studies suggest that when parents consume low-protein or high-fat diets, it can lead to metabolic disorders in their offspring when they grow up. Prenatal factors such as stress and improper diet may increase the risk of lifestyle-related diseases like diabetes in children when they reach adulthood. Environmental factors that affect parents may cause reprogramming of the health of their offspring throughout their lifespan. Especially, parental low-protein diets are known to be related to metabolic disorders in their adult offspring.

 

A new study carried out by team led by Keisuke Yoshida and Shunsuke Ishii at the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR) set out to find more about the process and has now discovered a key player and the molecular events underlying this phenomenon in mice.

 

Shunsuke Ishii said, "The most surprising and exciting discovery was that the epigenetic change induced by paternal low protein diet is maintained in mature sperm during spermatogenesis and transmitted to the next generation,"

 

The researchers found out that a protein called ATF7 is essential for the intergenerational effect. ATF7 is a transcription factor, meaning that it regulates when genes are turned on and off. The findings were published in the journal Molecular Cell...

 

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https://food.ndtv.com/news/high-protein-low-fat-diet-of-parents-may-reduce-the-risk-of-lifestyle-diseases-like-diabetes-in-kids-2198406