In this file:

 

·         Amazon Prime delivery delays are now as long as a month

·         Due to COVID-19, many Amazon orders won’t be delivered for a month

·         Jeff Bezos Tells Employees—and the World—He’s Wholly Focused on COVID-19

 

 

Amazon Prime delivery delays are now as long as a month

The e-commerce giant is prioritizing household staples and other high-demand items during the coronavirus pandemic.

 

By Jason Del Rey, Vox/Recode

Mar 22, 2020

 

Amazon announced earlier this week that it would start prioritizing the most in-demand essential items in its warehouses, as the e-commerce giant struggles to keep up with customer demand during the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic.

 

Now the other shoe has dropped.

 

On Sunday, customers and Amazon merchants posted on social media platforms saying certain non-essential items were showing April 21 delivery dates, even though they were listed as in-stock and shipping with Amazon’s Prime express shipping service. During normal times, Amazon Prime deliveries typically arrive in one or two days in the US. Now, some Prime deliveries for in-stock items are showing five-day delivery promises on the lower end, but those waits are as long as a month on some items.

 

An Amazon spokesperson confirmed to Recode on Sunday evening that the new April 21 delivery dates are not the result of a technical bug or error; they accurately reflect Amazon’s current reality.

 

“To serve our customers in need while also helping to ensure the safety of our associates, we’ve changed our logistics, transportation, supply chain, purchasing, and third-party seller processes to prioritize stocking and delivering items that are a higher priority for our customers,” the spokesperson said in a statement. “This has resulted in some of our delivery promises being longer than usual.”

 

The significant delivery delays showcase just how much shoppers are turning to online shopping during the global health crisis, and how even an online retailer as technologically-advanced and powerful as Amazon can only do so much to handle such an unexpected, once-in-a-generation shopping rush. On Tuesday, Amazon acknowledged the challenges it was facing when it said it would only accept new stock in its warehouses through early April if it was in one of six essential products categories, such as health and household goods or medical supplies. The company also said it was looking to hire 100,000 new workers to help sort, package, and deliver goods for customers.

 

The trade-off Amazon is making, for now, is...

 

more, including links

https://www.vox.com/recode/2020/3/22/21190372/amazon-prime-delivery-delays-april-21-coronavirus-covid-19

 

 

Due to COVID-19, many Amazon orders won’t be delivered for a month

 

By Michael Grothaus, FastCompany

03-23-20

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has upended almost every aspect of our normal way of life: socializing, traveling, and even working in the office are mostly off-limits. But now the pandemic has put an end to another thing we’ve always taken for granted: quick Amazon deliveries.

 

Over the weekend Amazon customers took to social media to complain that items they recently ordered were now showing delivery dates stretching all the way out to April 21—despite being listed as being in stock and available via Amazon Prime delivery, which normally sees most customers getting their items in two to three days. But those days-long ship times are nowhere to be seen on many items now. As Recode reports, the shortest delivery timescale many items are seeing is five days, with some having delivery times as long as four weeks.

 

Amazon confirmed that its customers weren’t seeing incorrect shipping estimates. The longer delivery times are the new normal for many products on Amazon. As a spokesperson confirmed:

 

    To serve our customers in need while also helping to ensure the safety of our associates, we’ve changed our logistics, transportation, supply chain, purchasing, and third-party seller processes to prioritize stocking and delivering items that are a higher priority for our customers. This has resulted in some of our delivery promises being longer than usual.

 

The good news is that “essential” items such as food and medical supplies ordered on the platform are being prioritized and shipped relatively quickly. The bad news: nonessential items such as Blu-rays, books, cables, coffee makers, and even clothing are going to take a long time to arrive.

 

It’s unclear at this time if Amazon will offer refunds for people who have subscribed to its Amazon Prime service in order to get quick deliveries...

 

more

https://www.fastcompany.com/90480709/due-to-covid-19-many-amazon-orders-wont-be-delivered-for-a-month

 

 

Jeff Bezos Tells Employees—and the World—He’s Wholly Focused on COVID-19

Amazon CEO sent letter to outline company's next steps

Bezos cautioned that he expects “things are going to get worse before they get better."

 

By Lisa Lacy, Adweek

Mar 22, 2020

 

On Saturday, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos posted a letter to employees, calling the coronavirus pandemic “a time of great stress and uncertainty,” but noting Amazon’s efforts to bring food and supplies to consumers with limited shopping options has never been more critical.

 

In the post, Bezos said Amazon has responded with changes to logistics, transportation, supply chain, purchasing and third-party seller processes to “prioritize stocking and delivering essential items like household staples, sanitizers, baby formula and medical supplies.”

 

He also highlighted adaptations for warehouse workers who cannot work from home, including “increasing the frequency and intensity of cleaning [and] adjusting our practices in fulfillment centers to ensure the recommended social distancing guidelines.”

 

Amazon employees have complained the company is not doing enough to protect them. Adweek spoke to one warehouse worker who said, for example, the company recommended what kind of masks they should wear, but was not providing those masks.

 

In Bezos’ letter, he said Amazon has...

 

more, including links 

https://www.adweek.com/retail/jeff-bezos-tells-employees-and-the-world-hes-wholly-focused-on-covid-19/