Coronavirus control is still control

Regardless whether the coronavirus is pandemic or not, the government efforts to control it are a study in the dangers of central planning.

 

Alan Newport, Opinion, BeefProducer

Mar 18, 2020

 

This entire coronavirus situation, with massive government management and overreach, reminds me once again of the dangers of central planning and collusion between big government and big business.

 

I lean toward the thinking of those who believe there is much more going on that meets the eyes, but none of that diminishes how obvious it is those in power believe they have the right to control nearly every aspect of our lives.

 

This entire coronavirus situation, with massive government management and overreach, reminds me once again of the dangers of central planning and collusion between big government and big business.

 

I lean toward the thinking of those who believe there is much more going on that meets the eyes, but none of that diminishes how obvious it is those in power believe they have the right to control nearly every aspect of our lives.

 

In fact, I think this provides a perfect opportunity for me to explain why I am so against government tyranny and how I got this way. After all, I write quite often about market destructions and alterations caused by government intervention, and I allude to the dangers of said collusion quite often.

 

I was raised in what I now consider a very socialistic family, one which generally thought President Roosevelt saved the nation during the Great Depression and social programs were and are moral and beneficent.

 

Fortunately, I was interested in politics and I worked in regular journalism for several years after college. I also tend to have a long memory, not so much for details but for concepts and for trends over time. The things I observed in that crucible of worldliness that began to change me initially were these: Public officials had inflated egos, craved power, and were prone to lie and sometimes to steal. Ditto, of course, for the political parties to which they swore allegiance.

 

So, my first move of independence was to reject both political parties because they didn’t represent my beliefs nor my then-limited understanding of the constitution. I also began to read more unofficial history, and increasingly to look for answers to my questions outside the normal pathways. The more questions I asked, the more partial answers I found, and therefore the more questions I formed. That was probably my first great awakening. I knew my public education was unimpressive, but was beginning to recognize I had been sold quick answers that were fundamentally incorrect.

 

I also began to read more about economics, as I could see economics was completely integral with daily life and politics. Also, I was and am interested in business and profitability, as I’m sure anyone who has read my blogs or other writings knows. In that context, someone shared with me a book called The Road to Serfdom, by the Austrian-born economist Friedrich Hayek. And here is the point of today’s blog: Reading it provided my greatest epiphany. To this day I cannot understand why it is not required reading for all high school children. It is that important.

 

Hayek’s writings (like those of Ludwig von Mises) directly countered those of the globalist puppet John Maynard Keynes, whose ideas on government interference and control of the economy have been the darling of the central bankers for nearly a century now.

 

Since I was an aggie and had only been formally trained in microeconomics, Hayek was entirely new thinking for me. The epiphany I mentioned, however, was Hayek’s explanation and assertion that government intrusion into a free economy opens the door to totalitarianism.

 

“Of course it does,” I thought. “That’s the story I’ve seen throughout history.”

 

About that time I returned to my Christian roots and I soon found the same patterns in biblical history...

 

more, including links   

https://www.farmprogress.com/legislative/coronavirus-control-still-control