In this file:

 

·         Beyond Meat, Tyson’s Raised & Rooted and other plant-based foods are officially mainstream

With more consumers willing to try plant-based proteins and more access, a meatless meal is no longer radical

 

·         Should Beyond Meat Investors Be Worried About Kroger's New Faux Meat Line?

It's not just another competitor -- it's a potential threat to half its business.

 

·         Subway, McDonald’s expand Beyond Meat rollouts in Canada

Burger chain boosts Ontario test; Subway goes national

 

 

 

Beyond Meat, Tyson’s Raised & Rooted and other plant-based foods are officially mainstream

With more consumers willing to try plant-based proteins and more access, a meatless meal is no longer radical

 

By Tonya Garcia, MarketWatch

Jan 10, 2020

 

A meatless meal was once a radical proposition for many consumers.

 

Now that health and wellness concerns are top of mind and plant-based meats offer up new and delicious flavors, a diet where vegetables and protein alternatives show up prominently is much more commonplace.

 

”Plant-based alternatives have absolutely gone mainstream and are gaining much more acceptance among consumers,” said Lizzy Freier, managing editor at Technomic, a data and analytics provider for the food-service industry.

 

“As people become more familiar with it, it’s now being integrated as something that’s just as tasty as traditional meat and something that’s sustainable. So I think the focus of late has been more on taste and sustainability and less on health.”

 

Market research firm CFRA forecasts that the global alternative meat industry will grow to $100 billion in sales by 2030, up from about $19 billion in 2018. As of October 2019, analysts estimated that the U.S. alternative meat market was only about $2.4 billion.

 

The global meat market is about $1.4 trillion.

 

At first, plant-based alternatives were viewed mostly through the wellness lens.

 

“That health piece has become cost of entry and now consumers are talking about taste,” said Risa Schwartz, global lead for consumer insights and analytics at Tyson Foods inc.

 

There’s a “reframing” of protein going on, Schwartz said, such that consumers are looking for it in different places and at different times of day. That includes snacks and breakfast.

 

In addition, plant-based alternatives are showing up on children’s plates as millennials pass on their desire for a more diverse menu.

 

“Parents are more willing to have kids try new things, but it’s about the form it takes,” Schwartz said.

 

Tyson’s plant-based protein brand Raised & Rooted offers nuggets for these young consumers, Schwartz says, as an example. It’s a familiar food made in a new way.

 

Raised & Rooted was available in 7,000 stores as of November 2019. Kroger Co. also announced that it is launching its own private-label brand...

 

more, including links 

https://www.marketwatch.com/amp/story/guid/0103AEDE-33E5-11EA-9733-61038509BAB2

 

 

Should Beyond Meat Investors Be Worried About Kroger's New Faux Meat Line?

It's not just another competitor -- it's a potential threat to half its business.

 

Rich Duprey, The Motley Fool

Jan 12, 2020

 

Supermarket chain Kroger (NYSE:KR) is the latest company to don a pair of gardening gloves and dig its way into the plant-based meat trend.

 

The new line of patties and ground faux meat extends the grocer's private label, Simple Truth Plant Based, one that it expects will see 50 different products launched this year.

 

Aside from the fact that Kroger plans to price its store brand of pea-based meat alternatives below that of Beyond Meat (NASDAQ:BYND), this new competitor actually poses a bigger risk to the industry leader than might seem possible, because it reveals several uncomfortable truths about Beyond Meat's position.

 

Planting the seeds of change

 

Kroger says the new Simple Truth Emerge: Plant Based Fresh Meats will become part of the largest natural and organic brand in the country, which had sales of over $2.3 billion last year. Simple Truth includes some 1,550 natural and organic products, and the new, plant-based extension of the brand includes vegan chocolate chip cookie dough, oat milk, sour cream, deli slices, sausage, and other products.

 

The meat-alternative line was first tested in 60 stores over 16 weeks in partnership with the Plant Based Foods Association, and also included deli slices, roasts, seitan, and jackfruit. Depending on who's counting, the protein segment of the plant-based market is expected to grow at a compounded 8% annual rate over the next five years.

 

While a rising tide might lift all boats, there is good reason Beyond Meat investors should still be worried.

 

There seems to be plenty of opportunity for everyone. Beyond Meat was recently buoyed by the news that McDonald's (NYSE:MCD) would expand its test of Beyond Meat's burgers in Canada, and rival Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told Reuters it would be "stupid" for his company to pursue the chain -- because it can't keep up with demand -- and "having more big customers right now doesn't do us any good until we scale up production."

 

Some analysts agree, and caution that McDonald's willingness to only slightly expand the pilot program suggests it also has reservations about Beyond Meat's ability to service all of its restaurants.

 

While Impossible Foods quickly walked back its CEO's comments the next day, with Brown saying "we would never blow off or disrespect a potential customer," his original point underscores the limitations of these upstarts until they can reach scale.

 

All hat, no cattle ...

 

more, including links

https://www.fool.com/investing/2020/01/12/should-beyond-meat-investors-be-worried-about-krog.aspx

 

 

Subway, McDonald’s expand Beyond Meat rollouts in Canada

Burger chain boosts Ontario test; Subway goes national

 

Glacier FarmMedia Network (GFM)

via Manitoba Co-operator (Canada) - January 13, 2020

 

Major fast-food chains McDonald’s and Subway are both expanding their rollouts of plant-based Beyond Meat products in Canada, beyond the range of their initial tests.

 

McDonald’s Canada announced Wednesday it will expand the test marketing of its “P.L.T.” burger from its 28 stores in London, Ont. to also include 52 in Kitchener-Waterloo, Guelph and surrounding areas in southwestern Ontario, starting Tuesday (Jan. 14).

 

London was McDonald’s first-ever test market in the world for the burger, which features patties developed by Los Angeles-based faux-meat processor Beyond Meat.

 

“The initial test of the P.L.T. allowed us to learn more about guest demand and how to integrate this new menu item into restaurant kitchen operations, while delivering the P.L.T. to our guests with the level of quality and craveability they know and love from McDonald’s,” company chef Jeff Anderson said in a release.

 

“As a test-and-learn company, the McDonald’s expansion of the P.L.T. into more restaurants in the southwestern Ontario region will help us learn more about our guests’ tastes while continuing to provide variety within our menu.”

 

Subway, meanwhile, announced...

 

more

https://www.manitobacooperator.ca/daily/subway-mcdonalds-expand-beyond-meat-rollouts-in-canada