In this file:

 

·         Fighting California’s need to rule U.S. agriculture

At bedrock, the fight against California’s laws keeping eggs, pork and veal out of the state is constitutional. Here’s why that matters to you.

 

·         US meat industry sues California over welfare legislation [NAMI]

·         Pork industry sues over California law on animal confinement [NPPC]

 

 

 

Fighting California’s need to rule U.S. agriculture

At bedrock, the fight against California’s laws keeping eggs, pork and veal out of the state is constitutional. Here’s why that matters to you.

 

Steve Dittmer, Opinion, BEEF Magazine 

Jan 07, 2020

 

Most people think that the Commerce Clause of the Constitution prohibits states from making laws that would discriminate or burden other states. But the issue is more complicated than that. It is not an open and shut case. Meaning, the courts have had to make the determination hundreds of times in our history.

 

Now consider California’s laws restricting eggs, pork and veal being sold in the state only from animals that lived in bigger spaces than mainstream modern animal production provides. So far, cases tried in California courts have, not too surprisingly, struck out. And, so far, the Supreme Court has refused to review any of the cases.

 

But the Commerce Clause, as it has often been interpreted would seem to offer promising avenues for getting relief for animal agriculture in the other 49 states.

 

Which is why the North American Meat Institute (NAMI), the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) and the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) are involved in lawsuits attempting to stop California’s bid to set animal production standards for the whole country, based on regulations stipulated by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). Of course, while HSUS talks about preventing its definition of animal “cruelty,” they never talk about their long-term aim, which is to force livestock producers out of business.

 

Even California’s government, in evaluating the effects of the new laws, admitted that producers would incur substantial costs if they wanted to comply with the regulations and sell product in California. Not only would livestock producers have to commit hundreds of millions of dollars in remodeled or new facilities to comply, but consumers will pay more for food, as many producers in-state will go out of business and out-of-state producers will forego the California market entirely.

 

Could beef producers get sucked into this mess? It’s not out of the question.

 

Why is this not an open and shut case? ...

 

Bring on the court cases ...

 

more

https://www.beefmagazine.com/commentary/fighting-californias-need-rule-us-agriculture

 

 

US meat industry sues California over welfare legislation

 

By Aidan Fortune, GlobalMeatNews

09-Oct-2019

 

US industry trade body North American Meat Institute (Meat Institute) has filed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of California’s Proposition 12: The Farm Animal Confinement Initiative.

 

Proposition 12 seeks to increase the minimum space requirements for calves raised for veal, breeding pigs and egg-laying hens in California. It also reaches beyond the state’s borders by prohibiting the sale in California of uncooked pork or veal from animals housed in ways that do not meet California’s requirements.The trade body opposes the law on the grounds that it believes it will “hurt the nation’s food value chain by significantly increasing costs for producers and consumers”​.

 

“Prop 12 hurts the family on a budget with higher prices for pork, veal and eggs, and unfairly punishes livestock producers outside of California by forcing them to spend millions more just to access California markets,” ​said Meat Institute President and CEO Julie Anna Potts. “We are a highly-efficient and unified economy in this country and so that’s just not right. If this unconstitutional law is allowed to stand, California will dictate farming practices across the nation. California’s overreach creates an unworkable patchwork of differing state regulations that will make it impossible for the supply chain, from small farmers to your local grocer, to function.” ​

 

Citing the State of California’s own economic analysis, the Meat Institute added that consumer prices are likely to increase because producers will have to spend to expand or construct new animal housing which may cost more to operate in the long term.  “The state acknowledges it may take several years for farmers to comply resulting in a shortfall of products and increased prices for consumers.”​

 

The lawsuit, filed in the United States District Court for the Central District of California, asks the court to...

 

more

https://www.globalmeatnews.com/Article/2019/10/09/US-meat-industry-sues-California-over-welfare-legislation

 

 

Pork industry sues over California law on animal confinement

The pork industry has challenged the constitutionality of a voter-approved California measure that will prohibit the sale of meat products from hogs born to sows confined in spaces that don't meet new minimum space requirements

 

By John Antczak, Associated Press

via ABC News - December 6, 2019

 

LOS ANGELES -- The pork industry is challenging the constitutionality of a voter-approved California measure that will prohibit the sale of meat products from hogs born to sows confined in spaces that don’t meet new minimum size requirements.

 

A lawsuit filed late Thursday in San Diego federal court by the National Pork Producers Council and the American Farm Bureau Federation targets Proposition 12, which voters overwhelmingly passed a year ago and goes into effect in 2022.

 

“Proposition 12 has thrown a giant wrench into the workings of the interstate market in pork,” the filing states.

 

The measure bans the sale in California of pork and veal from farm animals raised in conditions that don't meet its standards. It also requires that all eggs sold in the state come from cage-free hens.

 

The rules will apply to pork products coming to California from farmers nationwide, not just from in-state farms. The industry lawsuit contends that extraterritorial reach intrudes on authority given to Congress.

 

”Plaintiffs seek a declaration that Proposition 12’s requirements with regard to breeding pigs violate the Commerce Clause and principles of interstate federalism embodied in the U.S. Constitution, and an injunction against the enforcement of Proposition 12’s requirements concerning pork," the lawsuit states.

 

The ballot measure, dubbed the Prevention of Cruelty to Farm Animals Act, was sponsored and financed by the Humane Society of the United States.

 

The lawsuit was termed “frivolous” in a statement from Jonathan Lovvorn, the Humane Society's senior vice president for animal protection litigation.

 

"It’s an industry out-of-step with the preponderance of consumers who find animal abuse unacceptable, yet is still trying to hold on to archaic practices — like those banned by Prop 12 — that inflict an immense amount of pain and suffering on animals,” he said.

 

Proposition 12's requirements include giving breeding pigs at least 24 square feet (2.2 square meters) of floor space in group pens.

 

It also bars the use of individual stalls that do not meet “stand-up, turn-around” requirements, except during brief periods prior to farrowing and during weaning.

 

The lawsuit states that the measure's requirements “are inconsistent with industry practices and standards, generations of producer experience, scientific research, and the standards set by other states.”

 

It also imposes “enormous costs” on pork producers that will ultimately increase costs for consumers, it says.

 

Before the election, the nonpartisan state Legislative Analyst's Office said Proposition 12 would likely result in an increase in prices...

 

more

https://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory/pork-industry-sues-california-law-animal-confinement-67555889