In this file:

 

·         Walmart calls it 'Project Gigaton' but this isn't science fiction

·         Court rules Walmart must pay drivers $54.6M for layover, break time

·         Walmart to pay back wages, change policies after denying Navy reservist a job over military duties

 

 

Walmart calls it 'Project Gigaton' but this isn't science fiction

How can a massive retailer make a major dent in carbon emissions? By enlisting its many suppliers.

 

By Richie Hertzberg, Changing America/The Hill

Jan 8, 2020

 

A gigaton of CO2 is 1 billion metric tons, or roughly the amount of greenhouse gas produced by 211 million cars a year. Known as greenhouse gasses, this man-made carbon output has been directly linked to our rapidly changing climate.

 

Walmart wants to wipe out a gigaton of human CO2 emissions by 2050 — not just by cutting down on its own use of energy and fuel, but by working with its hundreds of suppliers to reduce their emissions as well.

 

No one doubts that the Arkansas-based retailer has tremendous influence. It is the world’s largest company by revenue. With more than 22,000 stores and billions of annual sales, it has the clout to command the attention of the hundreds — even thousands — of smaller companies that stock its shelves with a familiar array of goods.

 

With ‘Project Gigaton’, Walmart publicizes the achievements of suppliers who track and reduce their carbon emissions. But the real financial reward comes from the actions themselves. Companies participating in the project are saving money by cutting down on packaging, by recycling their waste and opting for alternative energies.

 

Some of Walmart’s ‘Giga-Gurus’ include...

 

more, including links

https://thehill.com/changing-america/sustainability/climate-change/476060-walmart-calls-it-project-gigaton-but-this-isnt

 

 

Court rules Walmart must pay drivers $54.6M for layover, break time

 

Matt Leonard, SupplyChainDrive 

Jan. 8, 2020

 

Dive Brief:

 

·         A federal appeals court Monday upheld a 2016 decision saying Walmart must pay back "tens of millions of dollars in damages" in a class-action suit brought by the company's truck drivers, according to court documents. Total damages add up to $54.6 million.

·         The drivers filed the suit originally seeking back pay for time spent in layover (a mandatory break as required by the Department of Transportation), on break or in inspections. The three-judge panel concluded, "time drivers spent on layovers was compensable if Wal-Mart exercised control over the drivers during those breaks" and the district court did not err in its original decision.

·         Walmart's driver pay manual was at the heart of the decision as it said drivers remained under Walmart's control during the 10-hour layover time at the end of a shift. The court said the drivers had to receive pay for any time they were under Walmart's control.

 

Dive Insight:

 

more, including legal doc

https://www.supplychaindive.com/news/court-rules-walmart-must-pay-drivers-546m-for-layover-break-time

 

 

Walmart to pay back wages, change policies after denying Navy reservist a job over military duties

 

By Jennifer H. Svan, Stars and Stripes

Jan 8, 2020

 

Walmart will revise its hiring policies and pay an undisclosed amount of back wages to a Navy reservist who said the retail giant refused to hire her three years ago because of her military duties.

 

The changes and back pay are part of a deal reached this week to settle a lawsuit brought by the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division and the United States Attorney’s Office on behalf of Petty Officer 3rd Class Lindsey Hunger, who said the retail giant refused to hire her at a store in Grand Junction, Colo., after she mentioned she would need time off for Navy duty.

 

Hunger said that when she applied in 2016 for a job, she told personnel coordinator Kathleen Kelsey in a phone interview that she would need two weeks off to complete her mandatory annual training, the court complaint said.

 

 Kelsey “responded that summer was a busy time at Walmart, the store needed someone who would be there, and that Walmart could not support Hunger’s absence for two weeks,” court documents stated.

 

Hunger was not hired and Walmart never called her back to discuss employment, the complaint said.

 

When the Department of Labor investigated Hunger’s claim, Kelsey told investigators...

 

more 

https://www.stripes.com/news/walmart-to-pay-back-wages-change-policies-after-denying-navy-reservist-a-job-over-military-duties-1.613918