In this file:

 

·         NPPC: Impossible Pork Is Impossible: Violates Labelling Law

National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) today called Impossible Foods' naming convention for its plant-based products designed to mimic real pork a brazen violation of labelling law…

 

·         Impossible’s ‘Alternative Pork’ Is Just the Latest Entry in the Fake Meat Boom

Are we in a fake meat bubble?

 

·         'Impossible Pork' unveiled with China as high-priority market

US maker of meat substitutes touts way for Beijing to cut imports

 

·         Impossible Pork FAQ: Everything we know about the newest plant-based meat substitute

… The man-made pork substitute is designed for kosher and halal certification, and can be used in any recipe that calls for ground pork…

 

·         Fake meat isn't meat, legislation needed

… Let’s break it down to separate fact from opinion…

 

·         We tried Impossible Foods’ new pork, the latest fake meat from the Bill Gates-backed company

 

 

 

Impossible Pork Is Impossible: Violates Labelling Law

 

Source: National Pork Producers Council (NPPC)

Jan 7, 2020

 

WASHINGTON, D.C., January 7, 2020 - The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) today called Impossible Foods' naming convention for its plant-based products designed to mimic real pork a brazen violation of labelling law. Citing law that prohibits the use of words that redefine pork as it has been known by consumers for centuries, Dr. Dan Kovich, director of science and technology for the National Pork Producers Council, issued the following statement:

 

"What's impossible is to make pork from plants. This is a brazen attempt to circumvent decades of food labelling law and centuries of precedence. Any adjective placed in front of the word pork can only refine it, not redefine it. It's not pork. It's not pork sausage. It can't be labelled as such."

 

NPPC supports consumer choice and competitive markets on a level playing field. Accordingly, plant-based and cell-cultured products designed to mimic real meat must face the same stringent regulatory requirements as livestock agriculture, including truthful labelling standards. For more information, please read NPPC's position paper.

 

# # #

 

NPPC is the global voice for the U.S. pork industry, protecting the livelihoods of America's 60,000 pork producers, who abide by ethical principles in caring for their animals, in protecting the environment and public health and in providing safe, wholesome, nutritious pork products to consumers worldwide. For more information, visit www.nppc.org.

 

 

Impossible’s ‘Alternative Pork’ Is Just the Latest Entry in the Fake Meat Boom

Are we in a fake meat bubble?

 

by Eve Batey, Eater San Francisco

Jan 7, 2020

 

Fans of meat alternatives will soon have even more options, two Bay Area food tech companies say. Over in Berkeley, a company called Air Protein claims that it’s creating just that, while Redwood City’s Impossible Foods made global headlines Monday when it announced that it had successfully launched a faux pork product.

 

Impossible CEO Pat Brown first brought up the company’s move into faux swine during a November Bloomberg chat at Shanghai’s China International Import Expo. In addition to providing a possible BLT to those who eschew flesh, the company says that simulated sow could help Impossible crack the market in China, where 60 percent of the average resident’s daily meat consumption is pork. According to Brown, Impossible had already created “very good prototypes” of pretend pork, and the company just needed to figure out how to scale it.

 

Three months later, it looks like that problem has been solved: On Monday, Impossible unveiled its pork substitute at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, announcing as it did that it will be formulated into a product called Impossible Sausage, and will both be available at 139 Burger King restaurants later this month.

 

The soy-based “meat,” which was available in multiple preparations at the Vegas event, “was a little spongy”... The obvious question, of course, is, “will there be Impossible Bacon?” Not yet, Brown tells CNet... 

 

more, including links 

https://sf.eater.com/2020/1/7/20961585/air-protein-fake-meat-impossible-foods-bacon-pork

 

 

'Impossible Pork' unveiled with China as high-priority market

US maker of meat substitutes touts way for Beijing to cut imports

 

Yifan Yu, Nikkei Asian Review 

January 08, 2020

 

LAS VEGAS, U.S. -- Pork dan dan noodles and dumplings are not unusual fare at an Asian restaurant here, but seeing those dishes made without using pigs is startling.

 

The plant-based pork substitute serves as the latest creation by Silicon Valley-based company Impossible Foods. The company looks to offer the product outside the U.S. soon -- especially in China, which the CEO calls a "high priority" market and the epitome of fundamental problems in the human food system.

 

The company develops plant-based substitutes for meat. Having debuted the Impossible Burger in 2016, the startup has unveiled its second offering: Impossible Pork. Journalists from around the globe became the first taste testers Tuesday at a media event tied to CES 2020 in Las Vegas, the world's largest digital technology show.

 

The company did not specify when Impossible Pork will hit the market, but said it aims to push the product in China and globally.

 

"China is the world's largest and fastest-growing consumer of meat, so there's no way we can achieve our mission without introducing our products into China, which is a very high priority for us," said Pat Brown, founder and CEO of Impossible Foods...

 

more

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/CES-2020/Impossible-Pork-unveiled-with-China-as-high-priority-market

 

 

Impossible Pork FAQ: Everything we know about the newest plant-based meat substitute

Expanding your plant-based meat-substitute choices, Impossible Pork is designed to look, cook up and taste just like pork.

 

Clifford Colby, C|Net

January 8, 2020

 

Here comes the other faux white meat. Impossible Foods, the brand behind last year's Impossible Burger 2.0 craze, captivated the attention of CES 2020 by launching a plant-based pork replacement called Impossible Pork. The man-made pork substitute is designed for kosher and halal certification, and can be used in any recipe that calls for ground pork. Impossible Foods plans to roll out Impossible Sausage later this month in five test cities.

 

Impossible Foods and its main competitor, Beyond Meat, are shaking up the food and technology industries at a time of rising interest in climate change. The environmental cost of raising livestock is high: Livestock accounts for 14.5% of greenhouse gas emissions, for example, and last summer's Amazon rainforest fires were a result of clearing land for farming and ranching. Plant-based foods like Impossible Pork hold the promise of making a smaller environmental footprint with a more sustainable way of producing food.

 

Launched here at CES last year, Impossible Burger 2.0 is now available in more than 7,000 Burger King locations across the US, as well as restaurants in the US, Hong Kong, Singapore and Macao and in several dozen grocery stores. The plant-based burger acts like ground beef, with a similar appearance, texture and flavor -- the burger chars when you grill it and even bleeds. Impossible Foods said its gluten-free pork and sausage substitutes should provide a similar experience for ground pork.

 

We've had a chance to try Impossible Pork in a variety of preparations, like sandwiches and dumplings. From the taste to the cost and where to buy it, here's what we do -- and don't -- know about the substitute meat.

 

What does Impossible Pork taste like? ... 

 

What is Impossible Pork made of? ... 

 

Why is Impossible Food making plant-based pork? ... 

 

Is Impossible Pork healthier than meat from pigs? ... 

 

When will Impossible Pork be available? ... 

 

Where can I buy it? ... 

 

How much will it cost? ... 

 

Can I freeze it? ... 

 

What about Impossible Sausage? ... 

 

What's next for Impossible Foods? ... 

 

more, including links, table

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/impossible-pork-faq-everything-we-know-about-the-newest-plant-based-meat-substitute/

 

 

Fake meat isn't meat, legislation needed

 

Robert E. McKnight Jr., Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association

via KMA Land (IA) - Jan 7, 2020

 

Opinion | Recently the “Houston Chronicle” and “San Antonio Express-News” ran a commentary piece from columnist Chris Tomlinson attacking beef in favor of plant-based proteins. Like most vegan marketing, it does a fantastic job of cherry-picking data and using opinion instead of facts and legitimate science.

 

Let’s break it down to separate fact from opinion.

 

Tomlinson begins by pointing to informal taste tests he conducts with friends, comparing burgers made with real beef to plant-based imitations. No one can argue that taste preferences are personal things – and we cattle producers have been known to have an independent streak ourselves.

 

The problem comes when he asserts that people should prefer imitation products because they “are worried about their health and the environment.” Those claims have come under increasing fire by the medical and environmental community as more-legitimate research begins to contradict the advertising rhetoric touted by manufacturers of plant-based imitations.

 

Fact: Soy and pea-based burgers are not healthier than their 100-percent-beef counterparts. A breakdown of the nutritional properties of both reveals that 93-percent-lean beef has fewer calories and less fat, saturated fat and sodium than plant-based imitators. Beef does have more cholesterol, but it also has more protein.

 

Many medical professionals have expressed concerns about plant-based meat substitutes because they don’t offer better nutrition but do contain dozens of greatly processed laboratory-invented ingredients. The healthfulness of those ingredients still leaves questions for many researchers.

 

One only needs to look at certain pet foods as an example. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has now launched an investigation after increasing numbers of dogs have been diagnosed with a rare heart condition while eating a diet with more pea-based proteins – a diet once deemed safe. The exact cause isn’t yet known; a big question mark hangs in the minds of many pet owners.

 

On the environmental side, proponents of the new imitation-meat products like to point to global numbers developed by the United Nations...

 

more

http://www.kmaland.com/ag/fake-meat-isn-t-meat-legislation-needed/article_f390e0d5-5ad7-5852-85bb-5af299d0922c.html

 

 

We tried Impossible Foods’ new pork, the latest fake meat from the Bill Gates-backed company

 

by Kevin Lisota, GeekWire

January 7, 2020

 

LAS VEGAS — Impossible Foods, the fake meat company with investors such as Bill Gates, was back at CES this week and had one of the more unusual product launches. The company introduced two new meat-replacements: Impossible Pork and Impossible Sausage. It’s the first new products for Impossible since the Impossible Burger debuted in 2016.

 

GeekWire Managing Editor Taylor Soper and I got a chance to taste the plant-based, gluten-free Impossible Pork — here’s our review:

 

Taylor’s Take

 

    The first few bites were awesome — and surprising. Juicy and flavorful is not what I expect from fake meat. It was almost like actual pork, but felt about 90 percent “real.” Something was missing, but not much.

 

    I would definitely eat it again, especially given the reduced fat and cholesterol content and environmental impact. But what about thee price, and the high sodium content (370mg per serving)? Is Impossible Pork really better for you and better for the planet?

 

Kevin’s Take ...

 

more

https://www.geekwire.com/2020/tried-impossible-foods-new-pork-latest-fake-meat-bill-gates-backed-company/