In this file:

 

·         Going whole hog: U.S. tells exporters to report pig carcass sales as China buying soars

… The USDA published a rule to specify that exporters must report sales of pork and beef carcasses effective immediately, after its Foreign Agricultural Service received informal inquiries about what must be disclosed. Previously, exporters had to report sales of “muscle cuts.” Traders and analysts said it was unclear whether that included different types of carcasses…  

 

·         USDA Clarifies Terms for Livestock Export Sales Reporting

… Today’s rule clarifies that “muscle cuts” of beef and pork include whole carcasses, whether divided in half or further subdivided into individual primals, sub-primals, or fabricated cuts, with or without bone. Carcasses that are broken down, boxed, or sold as a complete unit are muscle cuts… Exporters are required to report all foreign sales of these commodities to FAS each week and FAS publishes a summary report every Thursday at 8:30 a.m., Eastern time, unless a change is announced… 

 

 

 

Going whole hog: U.S. tells exporters to report pig carcass sales as China buying soars

 

Tom Polansek, Reuters 

November 25, 2019

 

CHICAGO, Nov 25 (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Monday that commodity exporters must disclose sales of hog carcasses, giving officials and traders more insight into a surge of Chinese pork buying that has roiled global meat markets.

 

China’s pork imports have nearly doubled this year as a fatal pig disease has decimated its herd and pushed prices of the country’s favorite meat to record highs. Its imports of beef and chicken have also climbed as China is scouring the world for meat to replace millions of pigs killed by African swine fever.

 

The USDA published a rule to specify that exporters must report sales of pork and beef carcasses effective immediately, after its Foreign Agricultural Service received informal inquiries about what must be disclosed.

 

Previously, exporters had to report sales of “muscle cuts.” Traders and analysts said it was unclear whether that included different types of carcasses.

 

China, the world’s largest pork consumer, is buying U.S. hog carcasses from companies like WH Group Ltd’s Smithfield Foods because Chinese meat processors need the entire animal, according to analysts.

 

“Timely reporting and publishing of agricultural export sales data is key to effectively functioning markets,” the USDA said in a statement.

 

The USDA publishes commodity export sales data each week that can swing agricultural futures prices.

 

The agency’s data had previously been incomplete because it was unclear whether shippers had to alert the USDA to carcass sales, said Dennis Smith, commodity broker for Archer Financial Services in Chicago.

 

Now, exporters know they must report sales of whole carcasses, carcasses that are divided, and those that are boxed.

 

“The rule is pretty clear now,” Smith said.

 

“It’ll give us a better perspective on the carnage in China - how much pork they actually need. It’ll give clarification on actual exports that are headed for the country.”

 

U.S. carcass shipments to China began in June after Smithfield Foods, the world’s biggest pork processor, retooled a processing plant in Virginia to slice hogs in thirds for export to China in boxes. Shipments reached a total of 78,390 tonnes by the end of September, according to USDA data, topping 676 tonnes shipped in 2017…

 

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https://www.reuters.com/article/china-swinefever-usa/going-whole-hog-us-tells-exporters-to-report-pig-carcass-sales-as-china-buying-soars-idUSL1N2850QV

 

 

USDA Clarifies Terms for Livestock Export Sales Reporting

 

Source: USDA, Foreign Agricultural Service

Nov 25, 2019

 

WASHINGTON, Nov. 25, 2019 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) today published a final rule clarifying the requirements for reporting foreign sales of beef and pork under the Export Sales Reporting Program.

 

Today’s rule clarifies that “muscle cuts” of beef and pork include whole carcasses, whether divided in half or further subdivided into individual primals, sub-primals, or fabricated cuts, with or without bone. Carcasses that are broken down, boxed, or sold as a complete unit are muscle cuts. Total weight of carcasses reported may include minor nonreportable items (e.g., hooves) attached to carcasses. Meats removed during the conversion of an animal to a carcass (e.g., variety meats such as beef/pork hearts and beef tongues ) are not muscle cuts, nor are items sold as bones practically free of meat (e.g., beef femur bones) or fat practically free of meat (e.g., pork clear plate) removed from a carcass.

 

Because timely reporting and publishing of agricultural export sales data is key to effectively functioning markets, the Export Sales Reporting Program was established in 1978 to enable USDA to monitor foreign sales of commodities including wheat and wheat products, feed grains, oilseeds and oilseed products, cotton, rice, cattle hides and skins, and beef. In 2013, the program was amended to include weekly reporting requirements for pork.

 

Exporters are required to report all foreign sales of these commodities to FAS each week and FAS publishes a summary report every Thursday at 8:30 a.m., Eastern time, unless a change is announced.

 

Today’s final rule may be viewed at: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/11/25/2019-25529/export-sales-reporting-program. More information about the Export Sales Reporting Program is available at: https://www.fas.usda.gov/programs/export-sales-reporting-program.

 

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