In this file:

 

·         Whole Foods Files For Statewide Restraining Order From Animal Rights Protesters

... On Monday, members of the Berkeley-based group Direct Action Everywhere occupied the location in the San Francisco’s Noe Valley neighborhood for more than three hours. Some activists chained themselves to the store and blocked the entrance. Others climbed on the roof and hoisted a giant poster of Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon, which owns Whole Foods...

 

·         What Amazon’s Plans To Open A Chain Of Grocery Stores Mean

·         Amazon Wants to License Its Cashier-Free Payment Technology

 

 

 

Whole Foods Files For Statewide Restraining Order From Animal Rights Protesters

 

KPIX CBS SF BayArea (CA)

October 3, 2019

 

SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX 5) – An animal rights group says Whole Foods Market has filed for a restraining order to ban them from all their California locations, in wake of a protest in San Francisco earlier this week.

 

On Monday, members of the Berkeley-based group Direct Action Everywhere occupied the location in the San Francisco’s Noe Valley neighborhood for more than three hours. Some activists chained themselves to the store and blocked the entrance. Others climbed on the roof and hoisted a giant poster of Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon, which owns Whole Foods.

 

The protesters claim Whole Foods has sourced goods from several farms with cruel conditions. More than 30 people were taken into custody.

 

In a statement after Monday’s protest, Whole Foods said...

 

more, including video report [0:29 min.] 

https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2019/10/03/whole-foods-seeks-statewide-restraining-order-dxe-animal-rights-protesters/

 

 

What Amazon’s Plans To Open A Chain Of Grocery Stores Mean

 

Lana Bandoim, Contributor, Forbes

Oct 2, 2019

 

Amazon is moving forward with plans to open a chain of grocery stores in the United States. The company signed multiple leases in Los Angeles, according to the Wall Street Journal. It may also open grocery stores in Chicago, Philadelphia and other parts of the country. Michelle Engle, senior vice president of marketing at Valassis, shared what this means in an interview.

 

Reasons for Amazon's Expansion

 

Engle believes it makes sense for Amazon to expand into physical stores because consumers still shop online and offline. Many purchases, particularly in the grocery category, occur offline. Operating brick-and-mortar stores gives Amazon the ability to collect more information about its customers and could create another avenue for Amazon to grow its Prime memberships.

 

"By operating physical and online experiences, Amazon is able to engage with consumers in new ways and, importantly, gather even more insight into their customers. Data is a competitive advantage and offering brick-and-mortar and online experiences let Amazon better understand its consumers," Engle said.

 

There are also different expectations specific to grocery consumers that this expansion addresses. According to Valassis research, 64% of online grocery consumers miss touching and smelling produce, and 62% of consumers are not comfortable having someone else choose their produce.

 

"It is natural that driving in-store traffic for Amazon will influence online shoppers to try items in-store and potentially purchase them. By expanding their brick-and-mortar format, Amazon may also tackle some of the online challenges above while appealing to new shoppers and existing online consumers," Engle added.

 

Amazon is expanding on various experiments it already has with brick-and-mortar stores, including returns at Kohl’s and pick up and returns at Whole Foods. This is part of the strategy to blur the lines between online and offline shopping, so they can reach consumers across all types of purchase needs, such as planned purchases and real-time, need-it-now impulse buys.

 

Whole Foods vs. New Stores ...

 

Grocery Store Changes ...

 

more, including links

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lanabandoim/2019/10/02/what-amazons-plans-to-open-a-chain-of-grocery-stores-mean/

 

 

Amazon Wants to License Its Cashier-Free Payment Technology

There may have been more hurdles than the e-commerce giant expected to expand its use itself.

 

Rich Duprey, The Motley Fool

Oct 3, 2019

 

Although Amazon.com (NASDAQ:AMZN) had plans to open 3,000 Amazon Go grocery stores featuring what it calls its Just Walk Out technology, only 16 such stores have opened in the past three years, with two more coming soon.

 

Since the company launched the first Amazon Go store to employees in 2016, its outlook on establishing a physical retail presence has grown, but undergone a radical transformation. Now it is reportedly considering leasing the technology to partners like movie theaters and airport shops, suggesting Amazon's plans are once again in metamorphosis.

 

A new industry sprouts up

 

The creation of Amazon Go did alter the retail landscape and change how companies look at checkout. The cashier was always a pain point for the consumer, and an expensive one for the retailer. Cashier-less technology promised to alleviate the concerns for everyone, though Amazon's version is an expensive option.

 

It's estimated to cost around $1 million to build one of the small, 1,500-square-foot Go stores because of all the cameras, artificial intelligence, and machine-learning technology that need to be crammed into the space in order to allow customers to take what they want and just leave.

 

Yet it has spurred competition:

 

·         Supermarket chain Giant Eagle is testing a similar system from Grabango.

·         Standard Cognition operates a store to highlight its technology.

·         Caper offers smart shopping carts.

·         Trigo Vision is testing cashier-less technology with the U.K.'s Tesco supermarkets.

·         Retailers from Walmart to 7-Eleven are expanding availability of scan-and-go technology.

 

Amazon may have figured that -- along with its reported new supermarket concept completely separate from Whole Foods Market -- its checkout-free technology is better as a licensing play than as a basis for developing a costly new store on its own.

 

Better for thee than for me ...

 

Piling up the profits ...

 

more, including links

https://www.fool.com/investing/2019/10/03/amazon-wants-to-license-its-cashier-free-payment-t.aspx