In this file:

 

·         Hogs and Pigs inventory on US farms increases 3.5 percent

… The producers are confident to get huge profits in the upcoming days… The prices are expected to come down due to the increase in supply, according to the experts. Hog farmers have got a new opportunity after the outbreak of China’s Asian swine fever...

 

·         Daniel Neman: Worldwide pork industry threatened by disease

… "On one hand, African Swine Fever is a huge marketing opportunity for us," said John Johnson, chief operating officer at the National Pork Board. "On the other hand, it is one of three (major) trade-limiting diseases" for pork…

 

 

Hogs and Pigs inventory on US farms increases 3.5 percent

 

By Shawn Genzone, Chicago Morning Star 

Oct 6, 2019

 

The US farmers were pessimistic for the fall harvest after turbulent weather this season but they got good news in the form of an increase in the corn and soybean prices and record-breaking hogs report. The US Department of Agriculture released a report which revealed that the hogs and pigs inventory on the US farms increased 3.5% this year as compared to the previous year.

 

The USDA has been counting the hogs and pigs across the nation since 1988. According to the report, the number of hogs and pigs on the US farms reached 77.7 million head. The report revealed that there were 71.2 million market hogs on the US farms as of Sep. 1. These are the highest numbers so far on the datasheet of the USDA.

 

Ron Plain, professor of the University of Missouri, said, “We are looking at a record market hog inventory, which is going to give us record slaughter.” He added that they had already experienced some of that. Plain added, “We are going to have plenty of hogs and pork this fall and into winter.” FarmWeekNow.com also released a report that revealed that the one week of the last month was the second-highest weekly production on record.

 

The producers are confident to get huge profits in the upcoming days. The US farmers were prompted to hold on to corn and soybeans due to the trade war of the US against China. The USDA will release a crop production report next week. The prices are expected to come down due to the increase in supply, according to the experts. Hog farmers have got a new opportunity after the outbreak of China’s Asian swine fever...

 

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https://chicagomorningstar.com/hogs-and-pigs-inventory-on-us-farms-increases-3-5-percent

 

 

Daniel Neman: Worldwide pork industry threatened by disease

 

By Daniel Neman, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

via New York Daily News - Oct 07, 2019  

 

It's the Ebola of the pig world.

 

African swine fever is sweeping across large swaths of the planet, causing devastation wherever it goes. It has not yet come to the United States, and officials here are working strenuously to keep it out, but it is still spreading almost unchecked.

 

None of this is news to pig farmers and indeed anyone involved in agriculture. But I just heard about it recently, at the Innovations in Food and Agriculture workshop sponsored by the National Press Foundation, and I was shocked.

 

African swine fever is a virus that only affects pigs, both wild and domesticated. Humans and other animals are not affected by it, even if they eat an infected pig.

 

But it can be highly fatal to pigs, which die after only a few days. It is also highly contagious, with a twist: The virus can live in the carcass of a dead pig for several months. That gives other pigs the chance to contract it, either from the carcass itself or from the clothes or the shoes of the farmer who touches it.

 

The virus is also spread through ticks, pig manure, knives used to cut the carcass, farm equipment and more.

 

There is no known cure, or even treatment.

 

Some estimates suggest that the disease has already killed up to one-third or more of the pigs in China. That is absolutely catastrophic news for the Chinese, who usually produce around half of all the world's pigs. One estimate is that half of the country's pork production will be lost.

 

Obviously, that potentially means financial ruin for Chinese pig farmers and the communities they live in. But the virus is hitting hard in other parts of the world as well, such as Vietnam and other parts of Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa and some countries in Europe. Last week, it was just confirmed to be in South Korea.

 

So China has turned to South America to meet its demand for pork, but now the virus is starting to spread there, too. The United States is one of the few major producers left unscathed, and, despite the tariffs, U.S. pork is being shipped to China in record amounts.

 

Pigs breed quickly and have large litters, so the increased exports should not lead to domestic shortages.

 

"On one hand, African Swine Fever is a huge marketing opportunity for us," said John Johnson, chief operating officer at the National Pork Board. "On the other hand, it is one of three (major) trade-limiting diseases" for pork.

 

A trade-limiting disease means that if such illnesses as African Swine Fever, Classical Swine Fever (which is not related to African Swine Fever) or Foot and Mouth Disease are detected in a country, other nations can ban all pork from that country.

 

Obviously, the U.S. pork industry, along with the government and pretty much anyone else who has a good idea, is working hard to keep African Swine Fever from our shores...

 

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https://www.nydailynews.com/features/sns-tns-bc-neman-column-20191007-story.html