In this file:

 

·         The end of meat? Today's morality advocates eating less animal protein and more sustainable weird stuff

The post-meat world will be free of the agony suffered by animals, and the ecological degradation suffered by everyone else. That is the story anyway

 

·         Growth of faux meat in Twin Cities restaurants, markets coming from – gasp! – meat eaters

Plant-based alternatives are popping up in more Twin Cities restaurants and groceries.

 

 

The end of meat? Today's morality advocates eating less animal protein and more sustainable weird stuff

The post-meat world will be free of the agony suffered by animals, and the ecological degradation suffered by everyone else. That is the story anyway

 

Joseph Brean, National Post (Canada) 

October 4, 2019

 

Canadian researchers sent the nutrition world into an uproar this week by publishing a review that showed the health risks of eating meat have been overstated.

 

In the largely skeptical U.S. news coverage, there was a familiar tone of moral scolding, linking runaway carnivorous appetites to environmental degradation. There were also shocking statistics, including that the average American eats 100 kilograms of flesh in a year.

 

But there was also something less typical, more shrill and confused, almost like an alarm from some distant corridor of the culture. Was that panic? Fear of what an unknown meatless future might taste like? Imagine nutrition scientists telling people to eat meat in 2019! They should be explaining how to ferment a bucket of slugs into a sustainable yet tasty Sunday dinner for six when all the cattle farms are covered in solar panels.

 

Food science, especially the kind that gets into the papers, has long been presented as a modern fable of doing more with less, of feeding the multitude with five (whole grain artisanal) loaves and two (line-caught wild) fish. Hence the recent fixation on eating bugs for protein and sustenance, rather than just for kicks.

 

So there is a strange contradiction in a food scientist telling you to eat meat. It is like a climate scientist telling you to fly to Mexico for a cheeky weekend away.

 

It is at odds with the morality of the age, which advocates eating less animal protein and more of the sustainably efficient weird stuff — both technologically weird like the Willy Wonka proteins woven from extruded bean snot and infused with soy “blood” that are now being fried and served on buns as fast-food burger replacements; and the naturally weird, like cricket flour, pupae protein, alien fungi, and aromatic molds.

 

Everybody knows meat is dead.

 

It is literally dead, of course, except for some shellfish and the more daring sashimi preparations.

 

But it may also be figuratively toast in the long run for a variety of reasons, including political concern about climate change and the exponential nightmares of a growing human population. As usual, price will be the immediate driver of any change, but price itself is driven by other factors, both within human control and without. There is also a lot of hyperbole around.

 

“History tells us that there’s a ceiling to these products (plant-based meat alternatives and replacements), and their ability to capture and dominate markets,” said Joel Dickau, who studies food history at the University of Toronto, especially the 20th century corporate effort to analyze the enjoyment of food and relate this new science to industrial processes.

 

Like an old man watching the world pass him by, meat’s future is not what it used to be. After the First World War, new technologies that were rallied to the pressures of global catastrophe transformed a luxury into a staple. Meat was in everyone’s future.

 

Meat’s future today is not even what it was a generation ago. Back then, the young internet still held promise as a medium that amplifies good ideas. You could imagine the ethical outrages of factory farming being solved by some reasonable legislation coupled with a newfound cultural sensitivity toward animal welfare, such that everyone started eating a modest diet heavy on the veg, but still including one lovely pork chop during the week, a happy steak on Saturday, and a well-read chicken roasted for sandwiches.

 

The tone on meat today is much more apocalyptic, revolutionary, and absolutist. The post-meat world — when we all go “Beyond Meat,” as in one of the more successful and vaguely cultish trademarks — will be a better place free of the abuse and agony suffered by animals, and the ecological degradation suffered by everyone else.

 

That is the story anyway. It sounds like a venture capitalist’s daydream because it is, and not for the first time...

 

more, including links

https://nationalpost.com/life/food/the-end-of-meat-todays-morality-advocates-eating-less-animal-protein-and-more-sustainable-weird-stuff

 

 

Growth of faux meat in Twin Cities restaurants, markets coming from – gasp! – meat eaters

Plant-based alternatives are popping up in more Twin Cities restaurants and groceries.

 

By John Ewoldt, Star Tribune (MN)

October 5, 2019

 

Meagan Ludolph had no desire to try the plant-based Impossible Burger. “Why would I? It’s not meat,” she asked as she ate at Hell’s Kitchen in downtown Minneapolis last week.

 

An iron worker from near Peoria, Ill., who was in town for a convention, Ludolph describes herself as “a big burger, fries, tacos and baked potatoes person.”

 

Then a friend sent an Impossible Burger to her table for a taste test. “This is spectacular,” she said incredulously. “It smells and tastes like meat.”

 

Many meat-eaters are discovering the meat alternatives that have shown up in restaurants and on supermarket shelves over the past couple years. Even fast-food chains are adding plant-based burgers to the menu, while alt meats have grown to 2% of retail packaged meat sales.

 

The new meats don’t appeal just to vegans or vegetarians, but also “flexitarians” who want more protein, fruits and veggies and less meat. More than 90% of Americans who purchase a fake meat burger also eat meat, according to market researcher NPD Group.

 

Local restaurateurs said sales are good and getting stronger.

 

“We were the second restaurant in Minnesota to carry the Impossible Burger almost two years ago, and it quickly became a top seller at all of our restaurants,” said Luke Derheim, co-owner of Craft & Crew Hospitality, which owns six Twin Cities restaurants including the Howe and Stanley’s in Minneapolis and the Block opening this week in St. Louis Park.

 

Major players Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods were founded in Silicon Valley in 2009 and 2011, respectively, with Impossible offering soy-based burgers and Beyond using pea protein. Their success made alt meat a $4.6 billion industry last year, according to research firm MarketsandMarkets, with that expected to grow to $6.4 billion by 2023.

 

What makes them different from the oft-derided dry, tasteless veggie burgers is their mimicry of meat’s texture, taste and bloody juiciness. Instead of being made for vegetarians, they are made for meat eaters.

 

The two companies have been so successful that others are piling on to compete, including Tyson, Smithfield, Kellogg and Minnesota food giants Hormel and Cargill.

 

Local, independent early adopters such as Hell’s Kitchen and Craft & Crew had to endure shortages of Impossible Meat as the company brought on national clients such as Burger King and White Castle.

 

Derheim eventually switched to Beyond Meat products for a more consistent supply. “The two burgers are very different,” he said. “There is a different texture and taste profile that made some customers extremely happy and others not happy.”

 

Avoiding the ‘veto vote’

 

Even when a meatless burger isn’t a runaway best seller, many restaurants still want it on the menu to avoid what they call the veto vote...

 

Catching on in stores

 

Local supermarkets are also seeing strong interest in alt meats, though they remain in the niche category...

 

Winning converts

 

Alt meat continues to polarize fans and foes...

 

more

http://www.startribune.com/growth-of-faux-meat-in-twin-cities-restaurants-markets-coming-from-gasp-meat-eaters/562202712/