In this file:

 

·         Alternative Proteins Not a Threat to Animal Agriculture [U.S.]

… There will always be a demographic of consumers that want and prefer conventional meat, and to be honest that’s most consumers in America. If a consumer wants to try a plant-based protein, by all means let them try it. Our job here is just to make sure they know exactly what it is they are buying which is in fact not meat…

 

·         National consumer study forecasts pork consumption trends and market stability of the pig industry [U.K.]

… “We were also expecting to see a downwards trend in pork consumption recent years, because of the movement to vegetarianism and veganism, but this hasn’t shown up in the data at all really which is interesting”…

 

·         The secret to curbing meat consumption? The answer is shockingly simple.

A new study finds that increasing the proportion of vegetarian dishes in university cafeterias reduces meat consumption.

 

 

 

Alternative Proteins Not a Threat to Animal Agriculture

 

Source: American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) 

October 3, 2019

 

An American Farm Bureau Federation official says alternative proteins won’t disrupt demand for animal agriculture. Micheal Clements has more.

 

Clements: The rise of alternative proteins prompts questions about how the products will impact animal agriculture production and demand. However, Scott Bennett, American Farm Bureau Federation Congressional Relations Director, says alternative proteins are not a threat to conventional meat in diets.

 

Bennett: There will always be a demographic of consumers that want and prefer conventional meat, and to be honest that’s most consumers in America. If a consumer wants to try a plant-based protein, by all means let them try it. Our job here is just to make sure they know exactly what it is they are buying which is in fact not meat.

 

Clements: Bennett says AFBF supports consumer choice, however labels cannot be deceptive or misleading.

 

Bennett: Alternative proteins are not meat and that needs to be crystal clear. Look, in my opinion, these products are for a niche market. For most Americans just trying to feed their family, they’re headed to the meat counter to pick up their next meal.

 

Clements: Bennett says its important to stay focused on growing the protein market.

 

Bennett: We tend to get caught up on the small slice of the pie of the market share that these alternative proteins are capturing. I would rather us focus on growing the size of the pie. That benefits more diets globally and still allows for that consumer choice. And, American producers of protein are first in line to benefit from that growth.

 

Clements: Micheal Clements, Washington.

 

document, plus audio [1:16 min.]

https://www.fb.org/podcast/alternative-proteins-not-a-threat-to-animal-agriculture

 

 

National consumer study forecasts pork consumption trends and market stability of the pig industry

Will James, University of Leeds School of Geography and Leeds Institute for Data Analytics, explains how PigSustain consumer analysis will allow the pig industry to forecast pork consumption trends and market stability of the pig industry.

 

The Pig Site

4 October 2019

 

PigSustain is a national project using a multi-disciplinary, integrated systems approach to model and assess the resilience of the UK pig industry historically, currently and in the future.

 

The aim of the project is to develop models to assess how the industry will likely be affected by intensification, fluctuations in consumer demand, climate change and risks associated with global production and international trade.

 

The project is broken down into five work packages: economic impacts; climate and links to disease prevalence; automatic detection systems; health and welfare issues; and consumer data analysis.

 

The multi-million-pound PigSustain project is now in its third year so with another year to go, the five packages continue to work as individual forces before coming together to produce one definitive model of the UK pig industry. To date, each group has published a number of articles featured in international journals.

 

In March 2019, the first results of the project developing the automatic detection system were published in Sensors. The paper proposed a new, robust, on-line multiple pig detection and tracking method which eliminates the need for manual marking and physical identification of the animals being monitored, and works efficiently under both daylight and infrared (night-time) light conditions.

 

In May 2019, the first results from the project analysing consumer data were published in Nature. The study has been the first step towards bridging the gap between published consumer data and known drivers of local variation in consumption habits. Will James, University of Leeds School of Geography and Leeds Institute for Data Analytics, and lead author in this study, explains how this broad analysis will allow us to forecast pork consumption trends and market stability of the pig industry.

 

“In this project, we didn’t just investigate pork consumption, we looked at the expenditure records of about 108 food and drink products, for comparative purposes and to ensure we spotted key trends in consumer behaviour that could link with pork buying habits,” says Will.

 

“What we want to be able to factor into our predictions is, for example, if people stop eating pork, what are they substituting it with in their diets?

 

“Equally, if there was a health scare in one industry, would people buy more or less of a certain product?

 

“We’re looking at people’s expenditure on products and what people are most likely to do if their opinions on production or climate change or health change.”

 

The first half of the project has involved analysing historical data collected between 2008 and 2017 and now the research team is beginning to run some future projections for specific food trends and the effects this will have on the pig industry. These projections will then lead to producing strategies on how to prepare for these changes and how to respond in the future.

 

The first results of the study indicated that buying and consumption behaviour varied much more over space than Will and the team thought it would, and that time actually had less of an impact on consumption trends than predicted.

 

“We’ve noticed significant differences between certain areas of London, and between areas like Devon and Cornwall and the rest of England,” says Will.

 

“We were also expecting to see a downwards trend in pork consumption recent years, because of the movement to vegetarianism and veganism, but this hasn’t shown up in the data at all really which is interesting.”

 

An example of this geographical trend can be observed when comparing the average spend per week on sausages...

 

more

https://thepigsite.com/articles/national-consumer-study-forecasts-pork-consumption-trends-and-market-stability-of-the-pig-industry

 

 

The secret to curbing meat consumption? The answer is shockingly simple.

A new study finds that increasing the proportion of vegetarian dishes in university cafeterias reduces meat consumption.

 

By Grace Wade, Popular Science 

October 3, 2019

 

We've heard it again and again: Eating meat is one of the top contributors to climate change. Feed production, poop lagoons, and cow's methane-filled burps together make livestock and aquaculture responsible for around 57 percent of the global food system's greenhouse gas emissions. Livestock also takes up to 83 percent of total farmland and played a partial, indirect role in the recent Amazon fires.

 

Despite this, humans aren't readily giving up their burgers and steak dinners. Rather, overall meat consumption has increased by 1.25 percent in 2017 and is projected to be 15 percent higher in 2027 than it was in 2015. Educating people about the devastating impacts of meat consumption can raise awareness, but it rarely changes consumer behavior. What might shift public eating habits, however, is simply increasing the quantity of vegetarian options. One study, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests it might actually help.

 

Scientists from the University of Cambridge’s departments of Zoology, Geography, and Public Health joined together to collect data from over 94,000 meal purchases across three of its college cafeterias. Doubling the vegetarian options—from one in four to two in four—reduced the proportion of meat-based purchases by up to 79 percent without affecting overall food sales.

 

The study focuses on understanding and manipulating consumers' choice architecture, which is the physical, economic, and social context in which people make decisions. For a worldwide population of 10 billion, some recent studies suggest that a healthy and sustainable meat consumption should be closer to 44 pounds per person annually However, the average annual meat consumption in the US, including food waste, is about 331 pounds per person. That's over seven times higher than where we need to be if we want a healthy planet. To achieve this goal, we need to find low effort, non-controversial solutions.

 

“Replacing some meat or fish with more vegetarian options might seem obvious, but as far as we know, no one has tested it before,” said lead author of the study Emma Garnett, a PhD candidate in the University of Cambridge’s Department of Zoology. “Solutions that seem obvious don’t always work, but it appears this one does.”

 

The research was broken into two studies: one observational, the other experimental. For the observational study, the researchers collected data from two college cafeterias over the course of one year, in 2017. Both colleges operated normally, varying their menus on a daily basis. On days when vegetarian offerings doubled, the proportion of vegetarian sales increased by 62 percent in one college and 79 percent in the other. Even the most carnivorous quartile of eaters—those cafeteria-goers who ate the most meat-based meals during the prior summer semester—were more likely to choose a vegetarian option on those days.

 

For the experimental portion of the study, researchers analyzed data from 44 lunches across the 2017 autumn semester. Menus alternated every two weeks between one veggie option and two. For the two veggie option weeks, the proportion of vegetarian sales increased by 41 percent. However, this number could be up to 25 percent higher due to a misclassification of vegetarian meals as meat due to miscoding (no meat meals were ever misclassified as vegetarian).

 

Because meals were purchased with university cards, researchers were able to track dinner purchases for consumers as well. They found that there was no rebound effect among consumers who purchased a vegetarian lunch. In other words just because they ate a meat-free lunch did not mean they were more likely to eat a meat-based dinner as a form of compensation. Their dinnertime behaviors stayed the same...

 

more

https://www.popsci.com/vegetarian-options-cafeteria-consumer-behavior/