… “All of the food banks in the area are in the same boat; we are in a crisis of needing proteins,” said Burnet's LACare Director Lottie McCorkle… Along with canned tuna and chicken, Pearce and McCorkle said families enjoy receiving cans of SPAM and Vienna Sausages, which are easy for individuals to transport, and a quick way to fill their bellies…

 

 

Protein crisis grips local food pantries

 

By Savanna Gregg, Burnet Bulletin (TX)

10/02/2019

 

As Burnet County food pantries continue to combat the hunger epidemic, officials have unveiled a new gap in the type of food needed locally and have asked for the public's help to donate more protein-rich, nonperishable items.

 

Although Highland Lakes food pantries receive food from the Central Texas Food Bank on a regular basis, members of the Burnet County Hunger Alliance revealed the facilities have received considerably less canned protein this year.

 

Officials explained that the decrease in proteins have affected operations at the pantries and ultimately the health of those who rely on them.

 

“All of the food banks in the area are in the same boat; we are in a crisis of needing proteins,” said Burnet's LACare Director Lottie McCorkle.

 

The alliance meets every month to discuss their methods of fighting hunger in their communities.

 

In the spirit of September's Hunger Awareness Month, they are asking those more fortunate to help those in need by donating nonperishable proteins ahead of any other canned goods.

 

In 2018, LACare served 2,376 families, 6,958 individuals, and 139 new families in need of assistance in the Burnet Consolidated Independent School District — an approximately 750-square-mile region reaching from Tow to Briggs. Just last month, LACare helped 338 families (including 29 new families), consisting of 989 individuals.

 

“We are all very fortunate to receive food from the Central Texas Food Bank,” Marble Falls Helping Center Director Sam Pearce added. “But this year, we've gotten zero cans of tuna, and zero cans of protein beans like pinto, due to the supplies they were able to get.”

 

The Marble Falls Helping Center assists 500 individuals a month, and Pearce said this summer, their pantry has been supplied enough protein to distribute three days' worth to a family, when their usual protein allotment would last weeks to a month.

 

“We have had to spend our own money to buy these products, and we are willing to, but we shouldn't have to,” Pearce said.

 

Along with canned tuna and chicken, Pearce and McCorkle said families enjoy receiving cans of SPAM and Vienna Sausages, which are easy for individuals to transport, and a quick way to fill their bellies.

 

“Many elderly people enjoy those type of soft foods as well,” Pearce said...

 

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https://www.burnetbulletin.com/articles/2019/10/02/protein-crisis-grips-local-food-pantries