In this file:

 

·         New CAFO envisioned outside Hinckley

… commissioners will consider a zoning change request this week that could herald the development of a 30,000-head hog production facility about 10 miles west of Hinckley… The effort comes about a month after county commissioners voted to end a moratorium in the county for new confined animal feeding operations… Major pork producer Smithfield already operates or is partner to several facilities in nearby Beaver County, with one new CAFO currently under construction in Flowell…“Right now I’m in discussions with Smithfield about maybe doing something with them. Right now I am essentially just kind of working through all that. I have no formal agreement with Smithfield,” Weston said…

 

·         ASF in Asia continues to incentivize expansion in U.S.

… “Current trade tensions had been somewhat standing in the way of pork exports, but even with a tariff of over 60% on U.S. pork going into China, we have seen a dramatic increase in exports into the country,” Nepveux says, adding the U.S. share of the Chinese pork market remains relatively small…

 

 

 

New CAFO envisioned outside Hinckley

Planning commission to hold public hearing on zoning change for planned hog production facility

 

by Matthew Ward, Millard County Chronicle Progress (UT)

02 October 2019

 

Planning commissioners will consider a zoning change request this week that could herald the development of a 30,000-head hog production facility about 10 miles west of Hinckley.

 

Steel Weston filed an application to change the zoning on a piece of property earmarked for the facility from range and forest to agricultural industrial.

 

The effort comes about a month after county commissioners voted to end a moratorium in the county for new confined animal feeding operations. Commissioners enacted the moratorium in February in response to an up-tick in interest among some local farmers to open new mass-scale hog production facilities.

 

Commissioners used the moratorium to explore options for strengthening the county’s CAFO ordinance, requiring stricter setbacks from cities and schools for such operations. Public hearings were held in Delta and Fillmore to gauge public attitudes to CAFOs and hear ideas for crafting a stronger ordinance, which eventually was enacted.

 

Weston told the Chronicle Progress he attended the public hearings and supported the notion that such production facilities should be strategically placed in order not to negatively impact nearby communities. In fact, he believes the new ordinance was not strict enough.

 

“I spoke at the ordinance meeting, the public hearing. There’s a lot of confusion there whether I was for the setbacks or I wasn’t for the setbacks. I was in favor of the setbacks because I felt like it just helps our community out to set these back a ways. That was my feeling on it,” he said.

 

Weston said he is planning to develop a state-of-the-art facility that exceeds national standards for hog production.

 

“I’m only going to be putting 4,400 pigs in a barn with roughly 10 square feet per animal,” he said. “I did that because I love animals and I believe they need space to move around. Economically that is the largest space almost in the industry at 10 square feet of space per pig.”

 

Weston said his facility, located on approximately 2,000 acres already under contract, would be run on solar energy instead of tapping into the local power grid.

 

Water for the facility will come from existing water shares and feed four wells planned for stock water. Manure from the facility will be turned into fertilizer and sold to local farmers.

 

“That’s a win-win because there is a shortage of fertilizer out there,” he said.

 

Weston said if the Hinckley facility is successful, he plans to develop more facilities in locations around the county, including near the lime plant and on a patch of ground east of Kanosh.

 

A 10-year Delta resident, Weston has operated a few businesses locally, including a stone operation and mining venture.

 

He works for Hog Slat today, fashioning flooring and other equipment for hog production facilities, including those in nearby Milford. Unlike those facilities, he plans to focus his facility on female reproduction, supplying healthy stock pigs to finishing facilities.

 

“I’ve always wanted to be in farming,” he said. “I think the climate and the economics and the situation just kind of works out. I really want to focus in my farming on the nursery side, the reproductive side of the hogs. By giving my hogs the 10 square feet of space, it’s going to allow my herd to be well above the national average on health and that sort of thing.”

 

Major pork producer Smithfield already operates or is partner to several facilities in nearby Beaver County, with one new CAFO currently under construction in Flowell.

 

Weston said he is in talks with Smithfield to possibly work together on developing the facility. However, the idea is so far still in the discussion phase.

 

“Right now I’m in discussions with Smithfield about maybe doing something with them. Right now I am essentially just kind of working through all that. I have no formal agreement with Smithfield,” Weston said...

 

more

https://millardccp.com/news/featured-local-news/4053-new-cafo-envisioned-outside-hinckley

 

  

ASF in Asia continues to incentivize expansion in U.S.

 

KPVI (ID)

Oct 2, 2019

 

Hog numbers increased by more than 3% from year-ago numbers, according to the USDA’s Hogs and Pigs report released late last week.

 

The overall inventory on Sept. 1 was listed at 77.678 million head, up 3.4% from 2018 and a half percent higher than pre-report forecasts. The third quarter pig crop was also slightly above projections.

 

“This increase was largely driven by increases in pigs per litter as opposed to increases in farrowings by producers and continues a long trend of increases in the pigs per letter over time,” says Michael Nepveux, economist with the American Farm Bureau Federation.

 

“Looking forward, increased potential profitability for producers as a result of African swine fever (ASF) in Southeast Asia is likely to continue to incentivize expansion.”

 

The USDA estimated market hog inventory at 71.248 million head, up 3.4% from a year ago. Pigs kept for breeding was up 1.6% from 2018.

 

“Every single report since March 2015 has hit a quarterly record in terms of the total hogs and pigs inventory, with eight of those quarterly reports hitting an all-time record across all quarters. As a result of this trend, we are expecting record pork production in 2019 as well,” Nepveux says in his analysis.

 

Pork’s export strength continues despite some barriers in place, he says.

 

“Current trade tensions had been somewhat standing in the way of pork exports, but even with a tariff of over 60% on U.S. pork going into China, we have seen a dramatic increase in exports into the country,” Nepveux says, adding the U.S. share of the Chinese pork market remains relatively small.

 

He says the USDA projected lower farrowing intentions in the June report. Analysts, on the other hand, expected producers would farrow more pigs.

 

Nepveux says the potential of increased profits in the wake of Asia’s ASF outbreak helped producers boost farrowings.

 

“This quarter’s pig crop was slightly above analysts’ expectations...

 

more

https://www.kpvi.com/interests/asf-in-asia-continues-to-incentivize-expansion-in-u-s/article_ab4aff84-6502-5518-a0c4-37dc17972182.html