In this file:

 

·         Amazon Wants to Turn Its Cashier-Less Technology Into a Service

More non-Amazon stores and companies could be offering the Amazon Go experience as soon as next year.

 

·         Report: Grocery stores upcoming from Amazon

E-tail giant proceeds with plan to launch new retail grocery business

 

 

Amazon Wants to Turn Its Cashier-Less Technology Into a Service

More non-Amazon stores and companies could be offering the Amazon Go experience as soon as next year.

 

Adam Levy, The Motley Fool

Oct 1, 2019

 

Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) is reportedly in talks with OTG's CIBO Express stores (found in airports) and Cineworld's Regal theaters to bring the cashier-less technology that powers its Amazon Go stores to hundreds of locations. It's also looking to install Amazon Go equipment at concession stands at sports stadiums, according to CNBC. It plans to start installing equipment in third-party stores at the start of next year.

 

Offering Amazon Go as a service is a $50 billion opportunity for the online retail giant, Loup Venture's Andrew Murphy said last year. How Amazon plans to monetize the service is still to be determined, according to CNBC, but there are a lot of different paths. Because Amazon has such an ecosystem of services, the company could offer several different ways for its retail partners to provide compensation.

 

How would you like to pay for that?

 

Amazon may give companies licensing its Go technology a few different options to pay for the service.

 

One option is to take a percentage of sales from each store. There are two reasons this might appeal to retail partners. First of all, the technology removes the need for cashiers, freeing up personnel and resources to increase product display space and protect against theft and other breakage. That reduces the overall cost of running the business. Second, the Amazon Go format has proven incredibly efficient in terms of sales per square foot of retail space. That could mean third-party merchants would see a boost in total sales, so giving up a percentage of those increased sales wouldn't hurt as much.

 

The second option Amazon is exploring is charging merchants up front and then taking a monthly fee after that. This option may appeal to merchants that want to have more certainty in their expenses, effectively replacing their cashier expense with a (theoretically) less expensive service expense paid to Amazon.

 

There are a lot of different models Amazon can explore, but as long as it's saving merchants money and expanding their profit margins, it should be an appealing option to a lot of retailers.

 

Taking back the retail cloud ...

 

Building out other services ...

 

more, including links

https://www.fool.com/investing/2019/10/01/amazon-wants-turn-cashier-less-tech-into-service.aspx

 

 

Report: Grocery stores upcoming from Amazon

E-tail giant proceeds with plan to launch new retail grocery business

 

Russell Redman, Supermarket News 

Oct 01, 2019

 

Amazon reportedly is moving forward with the opening of U.S. grocery stores separate from its Whole Foods Market subsidiary.

 

The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday that Seattle-based Amazon aims to open a chain of stores beginning in Los Angeles, Chicago and Philadelphia. Citing anonymous sources, the Journal said the e-tailer has signed more than a dozen leases in the Los Angeles area, starting with locations in Woodland Hills, Studio City and Irvine that could open by the end of this year.

 

These grocery stores would be part of dozens that Amazon plans to open nationwide, according to the Journal. The retailer also is eyeing sites in metropolitan New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, including spaces of 20,000 to 40,000 square feet in shopping centers, the report said.

 

Asked about the Journal’s report, an Amazon spokeswoman on Tuesday said the company “doesn’t comment on rumor and speculation.”

 

News that Amazon was planning to launch another grocery store business emerged in early March. At the time, the Journal said Amazon was in talks to open stores at shopping centers in San Francisco, Seattle, Chicago, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., and was mulling potential acquisitions of small grocery retail chains.

 

With the Whole Foods acquisition, Amazon signaled its intention to incorporate physical stores under an omnichannel grocery retail strategy. The company has been rolling out its Prime Now online grocery delivery and pickup program to Whole Foods stores since early last year and now has it available in 88 cities for delivery and 30 markets for pickup...

 

more, including links

https://www.supermarketnews.com/retail-financial/report-grocery-stores-upcoming-amazon