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·         Chinn says ASF training crucial across states

The nation’s top 14 pork-producing states are taking part in USDA training next week for a potential African Swine Fever outbreak in the U.S.

 

·         What US farmers can do while African swine fever continues to spread in Asia

South Korea and the Philippines are two additions to the list of regions with confirmed outbreaks of African swine fever in Asia, which now totals nine.

 

 

 

Chinn says ASF training crucial across states

 

By Julie Harker, Brownfield 

September 18, 2019

 

The nation’s top 14 pork-producing states are taking part in USDA training next week for a potential African Swine Fever outbreak in the U.S.

 

Missouri Ag Director Chris Chinn tells Brownfield Ag News the multi-state approach is very important, “Our success in stopping the spread of the disease is going to rely upon on how prepared all of the states are to take action. So that’s why it’s SO important that we’re working together with surrounding states.”

 

Chinn says two Missouri pork producers have volunteered to be a part of the four-day training.

 

Chinn says the training will involve hog movement, standstill, communication and continuity of business in the event of ASF. It’s the fourth training session among states that began last November...

 

more, including audio [3:25 min.]  

https://brownfieldagnews.com/news/chinn-says-asf-training-crucial-across-states/

 

 

What US farmers can do while African swine fever continues to spread in Asia

South Korea and the Philippines are two additions to the list of regions with confirmed outbreaks of African swine fever in Asia, which now totals nine.

 

by Sarah Mikesell, The Pig Site  

18 September 2019

 

Dr Dave Pyburn, vice president of Science and Technology with the National Pork Board based in Des Moines, Iowa, USA, said the global outlook for African swine fever (ASF) is not good. We are more than a year into the outbreak that started in China, and China shows no signs that they have the virus under control. ASF is considered endemic as it has been found in all the Chinese provinces.

 

“They are reporting massive herd losses in China, and I don't see that they're going to get this under control in the near future,” said Pyburn. “The news this last week and then again this morning is that now the Philippines has found African swine fever within their country so now they are positive. Also, this morning (17 September), South Korea announced they have tested positive on a couple of farms in South Korea. We now have nine total Asian countries that have ASF, and it continues to expand its territory.”

 

Pyburn said the top questions that he is asked are “what are the chances that ASF will enter the US?” and “what are the odds we're going to get it?”

 

“I can't answer that, but what I can say is the risk to us increases every time we have new countries, new provinces, new farms overseas that become infected. It means there's more virus circulating and there's more potential for that virus to be tracked into the US,” he said.

 

How could ASF enter the US?

 

“What I want producers and actually everyone that travels overseas to know is that the number one risk is us tracking it back in by coming back from countries that are positive. Another risk is smuggling pork products, intentionally or unintentionally, back into this country from countries that are positive,” he explained. “We can't have [ASF-infected pork product] in this country due to the potential risk of them being put in front of pigs that would result in disease.”

 

The UK, Australia, Taiwan and Thailand are doing testing on pork products that are being brought into their countries from countries that are positive, and they have found multiple pork products that have tested positive for the virus.

 

Philippines and South Korean pig population

 

While the pig populations in the Philippines and South Korea are nowhere near the US production level of about 125 million pigs annually, they still have sizeable pig herds. The Philippines produces about 12 million pigs, and South Korea has a reported herd of about 11.3 million pigs.

 

“In both countries, pork is a staple for them and it's going to affect consumption and the demand for pork in those countries. So it is big for them,” he noted. “One of the things about the outbreak in the Philippines is, of their 12 million pig population, it's estimated that 8 million are in backyard farms. That becomes a concern given the biosecurity of backyard farms, and it's going to make it even tougher to control [the virus] in the Philippines.”

 

Pyburn said it would be the same scenario in the US - backyard farms usually have fewer biosecurity measures in place, and therefore would be the higher risk farms for initially starting and continuing an outbreak.

 

What should US swine farmers do? ...

 

more, including links, video [5:38 min.]  

https://thepigsite.com/articles/what-us-farmers-can-do-while-african-swine-fever-continues-to-spread-in-asia