In this file:

 

·         Walmart opens its first-ever medical center and one analyst thinks it's really cool

·         Take a look inside Walmart's newest health clinic that's just the start of its push into healthcare

·         NPR Shopping Cart Economics: How Prices Changed At A Walmart In 1 Year

 

 

Walmart opens its first-ever medical center and one analyst thinks it's really cool

 

Brian Sozzi, Yahoo Finance

September 16, 2019

 

Walmart (WMT) has just opened up the coolest doctor’s office you have ever seen.

 

The world’s largest retailer snuck in under the radar Friday with the opening of a very promising new health care concept, signaling its interest in getting more into health serves as its Baby Boomer and millennial shoppers age. Opened in Dallas, GA, Walmart Health features 80 to 100 employees and is attached to a recently renovated Supercenter, according to Jefferies analyst Randal Konik, who was in attendance.

 

Walmart Health gives patients access to comprehensive, low cost primary care in dental, counseling and mental health. Folks can also get X-rays, optometry and eventually dermatology.

 

Care also extends to pets, says Konik, who came away impressed with the new concept. Konik rates Walmart’s stock a Buy with a price target of $127.

 

A source close to the matter tells Yahoo Finance it plans to open a second location in Georgia in early 2020.

 

Walmart’s big foray into health services — or so this concept suggests — comes as CVS Health (CVS) and Walgreens (WBA) continue to dedicate more of their floor space to such offerings. But by far, Walmart Health dwarfs in terms of size and offerings under one roof anything CVS Health and Walgreens are doing.

 

Up until now, Walmart’s health services only included optometry at most stores and dental at select stores...

 

more

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/walmart-opens-its-firstever-medical-center-and-one-analyst-thinks-its-really-cool-130421442.html

 

 

Take a look inside Walmart's newest health clinic that's just the start of its push into healthcare

 

·         Walmart on Friday opened up its first Walmart Health center in Dallas, Georgia.

·         The location is located next to a Walmart Supercenter, with a separate door for those looking to use the health services.

·         The new clinic is the start of Walmart's ambitions to get more embedded in the healthcare industry, with plans to open another center in Calhoun, Georgia.

 

Lydia Ramsey, Business Insider

Sep 16, 2019

 

Walmart on Friday opened up its first Walmart Health center in Dallas, Georgia, in its latest attempt to break into the massive healthcare industry.

 

The new centers come equipped with primary care, counseling, home care, eye and hearing exams, and dentistry.

 

The goal is to do for healthcare what Walmart's supercenter stores did for retail: offer a breadth of services conveniently and at a much cheaper price point than rivals. For instance, a primary care visit costs $40, while a dental visit costs $25.

 

 This isn't the first time Walmart's built out health clinics. While past attempts haven't panned out, Sean Slovenski, Walmart's president of health and wellness, told Business Insider that the current push was a top priority for the company's senior leadership.

 

"We finally got to the point this past year with the right strategy, the right team, and the right timing," Slovenski said.

 

Take a look inside the new clinic...

 

more

https://www.businessinsider.com/photos-of-walmarts-new-health-clinic-in-dallas-georgia-2019-9

 

 

NPR Shopping Cart Economics: How Prices Changed At A Walmart In 1 Year

 

Alina Selyukh, Heard on Morning Edition, NPR

September 16, 2019

 

Shoppers beware. That warning has come from economists ever since the trade war with China began last year. Eventually, they said, the fight between the two economic superpowers will hit regular Americans with higher prices at the cash register. The tariffs will bite.

 

Already some things are costing more. But the impact of the tariffs is uneven.

 

In August 2018, NPR began tracking how those tariffs might trickle down to shoppers at the world's largest retail store chain — Walmart. Since then, every few months we've checked prices of about 80 products at one Walmart in Liberty County, Ga., with tariffs in mind.

 

After one year, some prices in NPR's basket of goods have climbed significantly, at least in part because of the tariffs. The price of a dog leash has climbed 35%. A screwdriver costs 7% more.

 

But prices are complicated. They don't automatically rise with tariffs.

 

In fact, shoppers are only starting to feel tariffs. Last year, the Trump administration specifically targeted industrial materials and parts, rather than consumer products, to avoid shocking Americans with price hikes. The new rounds kicking in this month and in December will more directly affect a lot more of the things people buy every day, such as shoes, clothes and electronics.

 

To the White House, the goal of tariffs is to make Chinese imports more expensive so that American companies move production and jobs back to the U.S. But few companies have actually been able to do that; many stay put or switch to other foreign countries such as Vietnam.

 

Many makers and sellers have so far chosen to absorb most of the tariffs, spread them across dozens of items, or pressure suppliers to bear more of the burden. Big U.S. retailers — such as Walmart, Target and others — get the final say on the price tags, and for them, jolting shoppers with price hikes is the last resort.

 

When it comes to the prices inside NPR's tariff-inspired shopping cart, the average price change since August 2018 was a 3% increase. That's almost double the current rate of inflation.

 

It is important to note that some prices actually declined. The two most expensive Chinese-made items in NPR's basket got cheaper: a TV by 12% and a microwave by 17%. That's because TVs and other electronics have been getting cheaper for years.

 

Tariffs are only part the story. Prices go up and down for a variety of reasons. For example, Procter & Gamble last year raised prices on Charmin toilet paper and Bounty paper towels — noticeable in NPR's shopping cart — because of higher costs of transport and raw materials such as paper pulp.

 

The trade war's impact ...

 

Not easy to shift manufacturing ...

 

Food and personal care prices ...

 

more, including infographics, links, table, audio [5:41 min.]   

https://www.npr.org/2019/09/16/753712449/npr-shopping-cart-economics-how-prices-changed-at-a-walmart-in-1-year