In this file:

 

·         Govt sees no need for cull despite 3 new swine fever cases

… Closure of the slaughterhouse and mass culling of pigs are considered not necessary, the government said…

·         Record pig prices in China point to further import demand

… Restocking on a small scale so far this year has been largely unsuccessful, but large-scale restocking is expected next year as pig population density declines sharply, reducing the risk of infection…

 

 

Govt sees no need for cull despite 3 new swine fever cases

 

EJInsight (Hong Kong)

Hong Kong Economic Journal Company Limited - Sep 4, 2019

 

Authorities don’t see the need for any fresh mass culling of pigs at the Sheung Shui Slaughterhouse (SSSH) despite some new African Swine Fever (ASF) cases, the government said on Tuesday, adding that the facility will continue to operate normally.

 

“Since the period of stay for pigs in the slaughterhouse is short and [given the] comprehensive daily cleansing and disinfection, together with the enhancement of cleaning and disinfection of vehicles transporting pigs, the risk of ASF spreading in Hong Kong has been largely minimised,” it said in a press release.

 

Closure of the slaughterhouse and mass culling of pigs are considered not necessary, the government said.

 

The announcement came after the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) confirmed earlier Tuesday that ASF virus was found in samples of three pigs from the slaughterhouse.

 

According to the government release issued Tuesday night, a batch of pigs from the mainland was admitted to the slaughterhouse on September 2 after they passed the inspection by veterinary surgeons.

 

However, three of them were found dead prior to slaughtering, and test results confirmed that they had been infected by ASF virus.

 

It is believed that the batch was from a registered pig farm in Hunan province in central China.

 

According to a government spokesman, soon after the first ASF case occurred in Hong Kong, authorities “started imposing a daily clearance arrangement which means all live pigs will be slaughtered within 24 hours upon admittance into the SSSH”.

 

Also, holding pens in all different areas of the slaughterhouse were being cleared out and undergoing “thorough cleansing and disinfection every day.”

 

The government release noted that other pigs...

 

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Record pig prices in China point to further import demand

 

By Alistair Driver, Pig World (UK)

September 4, 2019

 

Rapidly falling supplies and record pig prices are set to fuel further pork import demand from China, according to analysts at Rabobank.

 

More than a year on from China’ first recorded case of African swine fever, producers that have survived saw record prices in mid-August.

 

Live pigs reached ¥20.92/kg (£2.46/kg), representing a 13% increase since the start of the month, while wholesale prices were up 32% in the first half of August alone to reach ¥32/kg (£3.64/kg), matching 2011 and 2016 peaks, according to AHDB.

 

Further price hikes are expected as the year progresses due to lack of supply. ASF has swept across the whole country, with the latest official figures showing the Chinese pig herd had declined by 32% year-on-year by July.

 

In its latest global ASF assessment, Rabobank estimates the herd loss will reach 50% by the end of the year, although it believes this will equate to a 2019 productivity drop of 25% in 2019 due to the number of herds being liquidated. A further 10-15% drop in production is forecast in 2020.

 

“In the northeast and north, the regions first hit by the disease, the loss has been severe due to a lack of experience, a slow reaction and weak biosecurity,” Rabobank said. “In the south, which was exposed to the disease at a later stage, culling of infected herds and panic liquidation jointly contributed to a sharp decline.”

 

Restocking on a small scale so far this year has been largely unsuccessful, but large-scale restocking is expected next year as pig population density declines sharply, reducing the risk of infection.

 

Chinese pork imports increased by 12% in the first half of 2019, with Spain the biggest beneficiary, followed by Germany and Canada, while beef imports were up 50%. Frozen stock levels have reportedly been high, but the current high prices suggest these stocks will now be drawn down, prompting further import demand, AHDB analyst Bethan Wilkins said.

 

Rabobank forecasts that exports to China will top 3,000 tonnes in 2019 and 4,000t in 2020, compared with just over 2,000t in 2018. However, it predicts that the EU’s ‘cautious’ production response and relatively high prices will limit the volumes it exports to China.

 

The US is best placed to export pork to China, despite the ongoing trade war between the countries, while politics are also constraining Canadian exports to China. Brazil could increase its export volumes, Rabobank predicts.

 

However, pork consumption in China is falling, with other proteins filling the gap, notably poultry, which is forecast to see a 10% rise in production in 2019.

 

EU pork exports to China slowed in June, totalling 305,300 tonnes in June. While still up by 10%...

 

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