In this file:

 

... countries such as China are involved in 'land grabbing' in Africa and elsewhere as part of the struggle to secure food supplies...

... food production is not keeping pace with demand and that the implications of this over the coming years are terrifying...

 

Your challenge, or maybe it is the challenge of whoever succeeds you on your farm, is to produce food in sufficient quantities to feed three billion additional people 40 years from now.  They will not be coming to your house for every holiday dinner like your in-laws, but they will be neighbors in our shrinking world who will live in metropolitan areas and not have the resources for food self sufficiency…

   

 

Union President Issues Food Security Warning

 

ThePigSite News Desk

08 January 2013

 

WALES - Food production is not keeping pace with demand and the implications of this are terrifying, Farmers' Union of Wales president Emyr Jones warns in his New Year Message.

 

Mr Jones recalled that, during a recent visit to the European Parliament, he was presented with a copy of "The Politics of Land and Food Scarcity" by the book's editor Professor Paolo De Castro.

 

Prof De Castro is an agricultural economist, a former Italian Minister of Agriculture, and, as chairman of the committee tasked with scrutinising, negotiating and distilling proposed changes to the Common Agricultural Policy, is currently the most important person in the EU in relation to agriculture.

 

Mr Jones said: "De Castro's book makes for uncomfortable reading. Its introduction summarises the situation by stating that the current emergency '...in our latitudes, where expenditure [on food] counts for less than 15 per cent of overall household expenditure, risks being viewed as remote, while it is actually dramatically close."

 

"While countries such as China are involved in 'land grabbing' in Africa and elsewhere as part of the struggle to secure food supplies, our own UK Government and the opposition argue in favour of effectively abandoning our key control over food production - the Common Agricultural Policy - which was designed to address just such an emergency.

 

Mr Jones added that food production is not keeping pace with demand and that the implications of this over the coming years are terrifying. Emyr is aware that inustry experts are familiar with this notion but Westminter might be shocked to hear it.

 

"Politicians are renowned for not being able to see further than the next election but it also seems than many are unable to learn from the lessons of living-memory. Our dependence upon food imports in the 1930s almost led to starvation and the loss of the War in the 1940s, and rationing continued well into the 1950s.

 

"While the prospect of another war on our doorsteps seems far away, population growth and food productivity, coupled with rising energy costs, climate change and a host of other challenges, mean that what we now face is unprecedented," warned Mr Jones...

 

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http://www.thepigsite.com/swinenews/31970/union-president-issues-food-security-warning

 

 

Can agriculture meet the challenge of feeding 9 billion people?

 

Posted by Stu Ellis on FarmGateBlog

Tuesday, January 08, 2013

 

Your challenge, or maybe it is the challenge of whoever succeeds you on your farm, is to produce food in sufficient quantities to feed three billion additional people 40 years from now.  They will not be coming to your house for every holiday dinner like your in-laws, but they will be neighbors in our shrinking world who will live in metropolitan areas and not have the resources for food self sufficiency.  Certainly yields are increasing, at least when the weather cooperates, but there are many who cast legitimate doubts on whether the challenge can be met.  But why would anyone doubt that we could not feed 9 billion people with our current land resources.  We’ll provide a “glimpse” into the future.

 

Glimpse is the acronym that Aiden Connolly and Kate Phillips-Connolly used to identify the roadblocks to productivity. They are Irish economists, and their perspective in the International Food and Agribusiness Management Review is labeled as a “wicked problem.”    That is because time is running out and no one is stepping up to take charge and provide direction to the diverse food producers. While some observers blame agribusiness for being the problem, the economists see agribusiness as “an essential component to meeting the challenge.”

 

The researchers surveyed authorities who are close to the challenge and report, “One of the few points of consensus among the many researchers and organizations attempting to find solutions, is that the private sector will be a critical part of finding ways to get more food to more people more sustainably. Agribusiness leaders are recognizing both the moral and practical dimensions of their role.”  Those authorities who provided their insight include producers, agribusiness firms, policy makers, consultants, researchers, and academics, and were asked, “What are the biggest barriers facing agribusinesses ability to feeding three billion more people?” Their collective response compiles the words identified by the acronym “glimpse.”

 

 

 

The Connolly team suggests that efforts by agribusiness can overcome government bureaucracy and corruption, as well as shaping policy in constructive ways.  However, they say there are no easy answers and sometimes barriers and opportunities are on both sides of the coin.

 

They conclude by saying, “According to a recent OECD-FAO presentation65 the 3 billion new people—mostly urban dwellers will require 1 billion tons of cereals and 200 million tons of meat. Building on the evidence that agricultural productivity has improved by 2.6% per annum over the past 10 years; they estimate that productivity will increase a further 1.7% per annum for the next 10. Compounded over the next 35 years, that will allow agribusinesses to generate the requisite 70% increase in food production.”

 

Summary:

 

Population growth over the next 40 years will require more food production, estimated to be an additional one billion tons of cereal grains and 200 million tons of meat.  But how can that goal be achieved?  Agribusiness must be on the team to help overcome: government, loss, infrastructure, markets, policies, science, and the environment.

 

Can agriculture meet the challenge of feeding 9 billion people?

 

source url

http://www.farmgateblog.com/article/1720/can-agriculture-meet-the-challenge-of-feeding-9-billion-people