In this file:

 

·         Consumers confident about food production

·         Survey Shows Americans Have Questions About Food Production

·         Survey: Moms Trust Blogs and Peers Over Government for Food Info

 

 

Consumers confident about food production

 

MeatPoultry.com, Dec. 27, 2012

by Meat&Poultry Staff

 

CHESTERFIELD, Mo. – Americans increasingly believe food production in the United States is headed in the right direction, but misperceptions about how food is grown and raised remain, according to survey results released by the US Farmers & Ranchers Alliance (USFRA).

 

Key findings include:

 

• 53 percent of respondents believe food production is heading in the right direction — an increase from the 48 percent who believed the same in a benchmark 2011 USFRA survey.

 

• More than one in four Americans (27 percent) said they often are confused about the food they are purchasing. Young adults (18-29 year-olds) are more likely than any other age group to say they are often confused about food purchases (38 percent).

 

• Three in five Americans would like to know more about how food is grown and raised, but don’t feel they have the time or money for that to be a priority (59 percent).

 

• When it comes to dining out, survey respondents prioritize quality (48 percent), cost (42 percent) and taste (38 percent). When purchasing groceries, Americans prioritize cost (47 percent), quality (43 percent) and healthiness/nutrition (21 percent).

 

• 27 percent of respondents said they want to learn about organic farming and ranching, and nearly all respondents (91 percent) said it is most important there are healthy choices available, even if they’re not organic or local options.

 

• Overall, 84 percent of respondents said they believe that farmers and ranchers in America are committed to improving how food is grown and raised. Half of those surveyed think farmers and ranchers are missing from the media conversation around food.

 

USFRA also surveyed farmers and ranchers regarding their perceptions of consumer attitudes towards food production and what they want in a dialogue with consumers. USFRA found:

 

• Three-quarters of farmers and ranchers believe that the average consumer has very little to no knowledge about food production in the United States (76 percent). In fact, nearly three out of five farmers and ranchers believe consumers have an inaccurate perception of today’s agriculture (59 percent).

 

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http://www.meatpoultry.com/News/News%20Home/Trends/2012/12/Consumers%20confident%20about%20food%20production.aspx

 

 

Survey Shows Americans Have Questions About Food Production

Three in five Americans would like to know more about how food is grown and raised, the survey found

 

Farm Futures

Published: Dec 28, 2012

 

The U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance recently released findings of a survey conducted about Americans' perceptions on food production. The survey, conducted to share with consumer media prior to The Food Dialogues: New York, revealed Americans increasingly believe food production is heading in the right direction.

 

However, the survey also found Americans still have widespread misperceptions about how today's food is grown and raised. More than 1,200 consumers nationwide were polled via telephone, with an oversample of 236 consumers in the New York City designated media area. The survey was fielded Oct. 22-28, 2012.

 

Key survey findings include:

 

-Fifty-three percent of Americans believe food production is heading in the right direction — an increase from the 48% who believed the same in a benchmark 2011 USFRA survey.

 

-More than one in four Americans (27%) admit they often are confused about the food they are purchasing. Young adults (18-29 years old) are more likely than any other age group to say they are often confused about food purchases (38%).

 

-Three in five Americans would like to know more about how food is grown and raised, but don't feel they have the time or money for that to be a priority (59%).

 

-When it comes to dining out, Americans prioritize quality (48%), cost (42%) and taste (38%). When purchasing groceries, Americans prioritize cost (47%), quality (43%) and healthiness/nutrition (21%).

 

-While Americans want to learn about organic farming and ranching (27%), nearly all report that it's most important there are healthy choices available, even if they're not organic or local options (91%).

 

-Americans overall (84%) believe that farmers and ranchers in America are committed to improving how food is grown and raised. Half of Americans (50%) think farmers and ranchers are missing from the media conversation around food these days.

 

USFRA also surveyed farmers and ranchers on their perceptions of consumers' attitudes towards food production and what they want in a dialogue with consumers. More than 500 farmers and ranchers responded via telephone, including 36 who opted in for participation through the USFRA site. The survey was conducted Oct. 23-29, 2012.

 

Findings indicated:

 

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http://farmfutures.com/story-survey-shows-americans-questions-food-production-0-72093

 

 

Survey: Moms Trust Blogs and Peers Over Government for Food Info

 

By Helena Bottemiller | Food Safety News by Marler Clark

December 28, 2012

 

American moms, who are increasingly interested in hot-button food issues like pesticides, genetic modification and additives, trust food and mom blogs for information about these topics, according to a new survey.

 

The recent poll of 1,000 moms, conducted by Fleishman-Hillard and TheMotherhood.com, found that blogs about food and blogs by other moms were ranked higher than government sources, medical sites and corporate sources for gathering information on food.

 

When it comes to pesticides, for instance, food and mom blogs were cited by 34 percent of moms, while medical sites were only trusted by 20 percent, and physicians by 15 percent.

 

The survey found that when moms wanted information on genetically modified organisms (GMOs), 39 percent trust food and mom blogs, 31 percent look to peers (offline), 24 percent rate the government as a good source and 18 percent listed medical sites.

 

Looking at artificial flavors and colors, food and mom blogs were considered a source for 39 percent, but only 21 percent listed government sources and 17 percent listed physicians.

 

On the whole, nutritionists scored a few points better than physicians on GMOs, artificial flavors and colors, pesticides and food sources.

 

Some of the comments listed shed light on concerns moms have when it comes to safety and health.

 

“I just feel there is not enough known,” one mom commented. “We hear it is safe one day, and then not safe another and I don’t want to risk it in my kids.”

 

“Make it easier to know what’s healthy,” said another. “Don’t trick me with meaningless labels.” Speaking of labels, the survey found that a whopping 78 percent of moms, especially those in urban and suburban areas, reported reading them on food packages.

 

The survey looked at which sources moms turn to for food information. Seventy-eight percent of moms said they turn to food programs on TV, making this the first-ranked source. Food media websites came in second, with 77 percent of moms reporting that they use media websites.

 

The next most reported resources: food brand emails (72 percent), Facebook (65 percent), mobile apps (53 percent), Twitter (52 percent), food magazines (50 percent) and food brand blogs (46 percent).

 

“We found it interesting that more than three-quarters of moms are watching food programs on TV and reading food media websites, and nearly three-quarters have signed up for food brand emails, considering these are not all ‘foodie’ moms, but everyday meal-preparing moms,” said Cooper Munroe, co-founder of TheMotherhood.com. “Food brands must evaluate how they are using these trusted channels to deliver the right messages, mom to mom.”

 

In the new year, 96 percent of moms said they wanted to be change food purchasing habits for their households...

 

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http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/12/survey-moms-trust-blogs-and-peers-over-government-sources-for-food-info/#.UN3K1HfIn68