In this file:

 

·         Amazon grabbed 4 percent of all US retail sales in 2017, new study says

·         Amazon Gets the Headlines, But Lidl Is Still the Grocer to Watch

·         Watching as Amazon Reaches over the Counter

 

 

Amazon grabbed 4 percent of all US retail sales in 2017, new study says

 

    Amazon was responsible for about 44 percent of all U.S. e-commerce sales last year, or about 4 percent of the country's total retail sales figure, according to data from One Click Retail.

    The fastest-growing product groups on Amazon.com in 2017 included luxury beauty and pantry items, the firm found.

    The most dollar sales were tied to consumer electronics (more than $8 billion), such as the Amazon Echo devices.

 

Lauren Thomas, CNBC

Jan 3, 2018

 

There's no denying that Amazon's retail business had an impressive 2017 and there's still plenty of room for the company to grow in certain categories this year.

 

The internet giant was responsible for about 44 percent of all U.S. e-commerce sales last year, or about 4 percent of the country's total retail sales figure, according to One Click Retail, an e-commerce analytics provider.

 

"Every major trend we see across 2017 can be explained by the fact that more of Amazon's core demographic (millennials) are growing up: they're increasingly owning homes, raising children, and buying a TON of stuff to go with it," One Click Retail CEO Spencer Millerberg wrote in an annual review of Amazon.

 

To be sure, he added: "This raises the question: will this create long-term changes and tailwinds for Amazon? Will 300-ish Whole Foods stores be enough to compete meaningfully in the brick-and-mortar space against Walmart's 4000+ stores?"

 

One Click Retail found the fastest-growing product groups on Amazon.com in 2017 were luxury beauty (up 47 percent from a year ago), pantry items (up 38 percent), grocery (up 33 percent) and furniture (up 33 percent).

 

The most sales last year on Amazon.com — more than $8 billion — stemmed from the company's consumer electronics division, which includes laptops, headphones and other computer components. Home and kitchen, publishing (which includes books) and sports and outdoors were other top-grossing categories...

 

more, including links

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/03/amazon-grabbed-4-percent-of-all-us-retail-sales-in-2017-new-study.html

 

 

Amazon Gets the Headlines, But Lidl Is Still the Grocer to Watch

Before Amazon.com jolted the food world with its $13.7 billion deal to purchase Whole Foods in June, Lidl’s U.S. expansion was the biggest story in the grocery industry.

 

Bloomberg

via National Real Estate Investor - Jan 03, 2018

 

(Bloomberg)—The price war in the American grocery aisle is getting more intense. And believe it or not, the reason isn’t Amazon.com Inc.

 

Amazon’s debut as a brick-and-mortar grocery chain last year sent tremors through the supermarket industry, with Kroger Co. and other established players losing billions in market value. But with its plans for Whole Foods developing slowly, Amazon is looking like less of a short-term threat.

 

For now, Aldi and Lidl -- two no-frills German discounters that are expanding quickly in the U.S. -- are putting more pressure on grocery giants such as Kroger and Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

 

“If it’s death by a thousand cuts, Aldi and Lidl are holding the blade,” said Mike Paglia, a grocery analyst at the research firm Kantar Retail. “It looks a lot like a price war, and you’re starting to see those ripple effects.”

 

Before Amazon.com jolted the food world with its $13.7 billion deal to purchase Whole Foods in June, Lidl’s U.S. expansion was the biggest story in the grocery industry. Lidl, which operates thousands of stores across Europe, opened its first 10 U.S. locations on June 15, one day before Amazon announced its blockbuster acquisition.

 

Slow Start? ...

 

Price Battle ...

 

Change of Plans ...

 

Getting Squeezed ...

 

more

http://www.nreionline.com/retail/amazon-gets-headlines-lidl-still-grocer-watch

 

 

Watching as Amazon Reaches over the Counter

 

By David Marino-Nachison, Barron's

Jan. 3, 2018

 

One of the clearest examples of how far companies will go to fight Amazon’s encroachment into their businesses came in early December, when CVS said it planned to buy Aetna for some $77 billion. (Amazon wasn’t the only reason, but it was an important one.)

 

For an up-close illustration of the effect Amazon could have on the drugstore business, take a look at this chart, released in mid-December by Raymond James analysts, which compares the prices for five private-label over-the-counter drugs at Amazon and four major retailers. Amazon had the cheapest offering in every case but one, when it was second-cheapest to Wal-Mart.

 

“We aren’t dialing up our scientific, proprietary ‘Sky is Falling Freakout-o-meter’ to ‘11,’” the analysts wrote, but “we do think that this move bears monitoring, especially if it marks the first baby step into a more complete competitive threat to the drug retailers.”

 

Amazon is generally thought of as having serious designs on the pharmacy business...

 

more, including links

https://www.barrons.com/articles/watching-as-amazon-reaches-over-the-counter-1514992001