Real risk Black Death plague will reach US, Europe and BRITAIN, disease expert warns

THE deadly plague outbreak could reach every continent, a disease expert has horrifyingly warned.

                       

By Charlotte Ikonen, Daily Star (UK)

13th November 2017

 

The disease ravaging Madagascar has already killed 143 people and infected another 2,000.

 

Health officials are warning things will get even worse before they get better and have dubbed this the “worst outbreak in 50 years”.

 

A similar outbreak of the Black Death killed off one third of medieval Europe.

 

Speaking to Daily Star Online, disease outbreak expert Professor Paul Hunter said the plague could reach every continent, starting with mainland Africa.

 

He said: “This current outbreak is concerning given that it is different from previous cases we have seen, and has been spreading to areas that are not used to seeing it.

 

“There is always a risk with travel that the disease will spread globally.

 

“We don’t want a situation where the disease spreads so fast it gets out of control.

 

"We are talking about it spreading in days rather than weeks.”

 

Mr Hunter said the main worry was that people would keep symptoms to themselves in order to travel.

 

The plague, which is airborne and spread by coughing and sneezing, has been spreading through the east African nation since August.

 

It can kill in just 24 hours.

 

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has been forced to issue warnings for nine countries surrounding Madagascar.

 

It said the plague – which has reached 73% of the county – is more of a threat than previous outbreaks because it has taken the more deadly pneumonic form.

 

The outbreak is expected to continue until around April next year and UK authorities have warned Brits off visiting the African wildlife paradise.

 

Tarik Jasarevic of WHO told Daily Star Online that the possibility of future flare-ups couldn't be ruled out...

 

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