In this file:

 

·         Animal Rights Activists Disrupt Exclusive Pig Roast Event in Washington, D.C.

Dozens of animal rights activists disrupted a event celebrating pig consumption at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C… Cochon555…

 

·         Unsettled by the Dead Animals in Your Paint? Welcome to the World of Vegan Art Supplies

·         These Pictures Prove That Animals Don’t Want to Be Slaughtered [Not Graphic]

·         Animal activists “let off” charges under NSW Surveillance Devices Act due to technicality

… Mr Delforce issued a statement via the Animal Liberation Facebook page which described the two activists as “brave” warriors...

 

 

Animal Rights Activists Disrupt Exclusive Pig Roast Event in Washington, D.C.

 

by Donny Moss, TheirTurn.net

August 8, 2017

 

Dozens of animal rights activists disrupted a event celebrating pig consumption at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. According to organizers, Cochon555 is “a nose-to-tail culinary tour dedicated to . . . educating chefs and diners about the agricultural importance of utilizing Old World livestock.” The event is held in 14 cities around the country. “Cochon” is French for pig.

 

“Cochon555 is working to make people feel good about eating meat by perpetuating the myth that animals can be slaughtered humanely,” said Amanda Houdeschell, one of the organizers of the protest. “It’s a fraud, and it’s giving people who might otherwise abstain from eating animals a free pass to turn a blind eye to the horrors inflicted on them.”

 

Several minutes into the disruption, Cochon555 organizers turned off the lights in the hotel ballroom and turned up the volume on the music in an effort to drown out the protesters. While many of the guests at the carnivorous event appeared to be amused by the disruption, organizers were visibly jarred.  As protesters exited the hotel, one Cochon555 representative attempted to justify the pig festival to the activists:

 

more, including video, photos

http://theirturn.net/2017/08/08/animal-rights-activists-disrupt-Cochon555-pig-roast/

 

 

Unsettled by the Dead Animals in Your Paint? Welcome to the World of Vegan Art Supplies

High-grade art supplies now offer conscientious artists professional-quality work materials free of animal products—or animal testing.

 

Dylan Kerr, ArtNet News

August 8, 2017

 

The next time you see a watercolor painting—maybe one your child brought home from preschool, or a masterpiece by someone like Georgia O’Keeffe—try not to think about the all the bile that went into it. (Ox gall, the dried extract of bovine gall bladders, is a wetting agent widely used to give watercolors their famous liquid quality.)

 

If the painting happens to be on a canvas that’s been gessoed, add gelatin—the boiled skins, bones, tendons, and hooves of pigs and cows—to the list of things to forget about. And don’t ask how the canvas was sized, either (they probably used rabbit skin glue), or what kind of brush they chose to paint with (chances are good it was made from the fur of a ferret, squirrel, goat, or horse).

 

Artists don’t usually think of their work as a final resting place for animal parts. But from sepia (forcibly obtained from squid) and India ink (more crushed bugs) and to oil pastels (fat + beeswax) and charcoal (specifically Bone Black, which lives up to its name), critters’ bodies abound in all manner of art supplies. This isn’t unusual in the context of 21st-century consumerism; animals pop up in all kinds of products beyond meat and leather, especially if one includes those tested for safety on nonhuman “participants.”

 

It’s a state of affairs most people and companies prefer not to discuss, with one big exception: vegans, people who refuse to consume or utilize products that cause animal suffering in their manufacture.

 

As a result of increased awareness of farm animals’ plights, celebrity endorsements from figures ranging from Miley Cyrus to Morrissey, popular documentaries like Food, Inc., and a cultural shift towards both self-care and Instagrammable activism, vegans are becoming a consumer group to be reckoned with. And the market, as it always does, is shifting to accommodate them. Meatless burgers and cruelty-free shampoo have become commonplace. Now, thanks to dedicated activists and a few canny companies, vegan art supplies are on their way, too.

 

When it comes to art materials, a spate of new products is slowly appearing in shops, pushed by companies looking to distinguish themselves from the competition and cater to buyers looking to make art without contributing to the animal-industrial complex.

 

Paints, Paper, Pencils, and More ...

 

What Vegan Artists Use ...

 

more, including links

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/vegan-art-supplies-1039508

 

 

These Pictures Prove That Animals Don’t Want to Be Slaughtered [Not Graphic]

 

Written by Emily Savage, PETA

August 8, 2017

 

Imagine that it was your last chance to gaze at a clear blue sky, your last breath of fresh air—would you know that these were your final moments on Earth? For these animals on livestock transport trucks, this may have been their first and last glimpse of a world outside the pain and misery of animal agriculture. It may have been their last moments of life.

 

For a year, Sympathy at Slaughter‘s Hannah Elizabeth has been recording the final moments of pigs and cows on transport trucks outside slaughterhouses and at truck stops, with the intention of offering some solace to individual animals before they’re driven to be slaughtered.

 

“Each time I am there the animals are always so curious, gentle and forgiving enough to come closer,” she says.

 

“Patterns vary as each truck and each animal has a different story,” she adds. “I am always struck by the penetrating emotion expressed in their eyes. The heart-rending scratches that populate their human-like skin.”

 

Looking at her images, one can’t help but wonder what these animals, packed into these filthy trucks, must have been going through.

 

Was this their first moment of human compassion? ...

 

more, including photos

https://www.peta.org/blog/animals-last-moments-alive/

 

 

Animal activists “let off” charges under NSW Surveillance Devices Act due to technicality

 

Colin Bettles, Queensland Country Life (Australia)

8 Aug 2017

 

THE PORK industry fear a decision to dismiss legal charges against two animal rights activists under the NSW Surveillance Devices Act, due to a technicality, could embolden a fresh round of civil disobedience protest activity, by anti-intensive farming activists.

 

Christopher Delforce and Dorottya Kiss were charged with various offences under the privacy laws following an extensive investigation by NSW Police which, in June 2015, saw two search warrants executed, in Adelaide and the Sydney suburb of Ryde, where electronic recording devices were seized as evidence.

 

Strike Force Shubach was established by the Cootamundra Local Area Command after piggeries throughout southern NSW were repeatedly targeted via the illegal installation of recording devices and publication of related material aimed at portraying largely routine and legal farming practices, as animal cruelty.

 

After several preliminary hearings and legal negotiations, the case was due to be heard in the Cootamundra Court today where the defendants were likely to argue the constitutional merits of the public interest associated with recording such activities.

 

But in an upset result, Mr Delforce and Ms Kiss were awarded costs totalling $56,000 after the judge dismissed charges against them due to non-compliance with prescribed police investigative and charging procedures.

 

Ms Kiss was facing two charges of installing and the use of an optical recording device without consent - but was awarded $16,000 costs after the judge dismissed both charges.

 

Mr Delforce was facing four charges under the same section of the Act along with six others relating to matters of publishing material obtained from surveillance devices - but was awarded $40,000 costs after all charges were dismissed.

 

Australian Pork Limited (APL) policy general manager Deb Kerr said she attended today’s court hearing along with several pork producers, given the industry’s “significant interest” in the outcome of the legal case.

 

Ms Kerr said Mr Delforce’s defence barrister argued for a point of law on whether the charges were laid under due process.

 

But she said the judge, after hearing evidence from both the defence and prosecution, ruled the defence had a case and dismissed all charges.

 

Ms Kerr said the activists were “let-off on a technicality”, because the consent form issued by the Director of Public Prosecutions in NSW, wasn’t dated.

 

She said that brought into question whether or not the consent was duly approved and given, before any of the charges were laid.

 

“The charges laid were in relation to the installation of cameras and other equipment, recording devices, illegally installed under the Surveillance Devises Act - but as the charges were thrown out, the case has not been heard to be either proven or disproven, on charges of purported illegal recordings,” she said.

 

“Obviously we have a significant interest as an industry in today’s outcome and I think not only APL but the entire pork industry would be disappointed with the result.

 

“It’s about the right of producers to have enjoyment of their personal life and business and undertake a lawful business (but) animal activists take it into their own right to be judge and jury of that business.”

 

Mr Delforce issued a statement via the Animal Liberation Facebook page which described the two activists as “brave” warriors...

 

more

http://www.queenslandcountrylife.com.au/story/4842862/animal-activists-let-off-charges-due-to-technicality/