In this file:

 

·         Chinese export illegally adulterated fish to Brazil, police say

The fish were injected with water and chemical products to raise prices

 

·         China exporting adulterated fish to Brazil: Brazilian police

Investigators from the agriculture ministry in Santa Catarina found local businesses selling adulterated pollock, hake and other imported species, police said in a statement.

 

·         Chinese Chicken Is Headed To America, But It's Really All About The Beef

Cooked chicken from birds grown and raised in China soon will be headed to America... last December, China's own Food and Drug Administration reported it had uncovered as many as a half-million cases of food-safety violations just in the first three quarters of 2016...

 

·         USDA reorganization plan could reduce food safety protections

… Given the numerous food safety concerns China has experienced in recent years, an equivalency determination from the U.S. presents an opportunity for China to improve their food safety reputation around the world…

 

 

Chinese export illegally adulterated fish to Brazil, police say

The fish were injected with water and chemical products to raise prices

 

By plus55

May 17, 2017

 

The Brazilian police have uncovered a criminal ring helping the Chinese export adulterated fish in the state of Santa Catarina. According to a police statement, the fish contained water and chemical products which made them heavier to raise prices. Moreover, the ring routed the fish through corrupt agricultural inspectors to skirt the usual controls.

 

Authorities from the Santa Catarina agricultural ministry found local businesses selling adulterated pollock, hake, and other imported species. The adulteration itself took place while the products were still in China, however. The fraud scheme ran from 2015 to 2017. While the exact value of the adulterated fish remains unknown, the products were present across Brazil.

 

Fugu & Lucas

 

The police have named the investigation “Operation Fugu”, after the venenous Brazilian fish Baiacu...

 

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http://plus55.com/brazil-business/2017/05/chinese-export-adulterated-fish-brazil

 

 

China exporting adulterated fish to Brazil: Brazilian police

Investigators from the agriculture ministry in Santa Catarina found local businesses selling adulterated pollock, hake and other imported species, police said in a statement.

 

By: AFP

via Indian Express - May 17, 2017

 

Brasilia | Brazilian police has said they have uncovered a ring that imported Chinese fish illegally adulterated to be heavier and as such, worth more when resold. Investigators from the agriculture ministry in the southern state of Santa Catarina found local businesses selling adulterated pollock, hake and other imported species, police said in a statement Tuesday.

 

The fish had been injected with “water and chemical products, which among other effects raised the price of the products,” police said. The fish were then routed by corrupt agricultural inspectors to avoid the usual controls, the statement said.

 

The adulteration took place while still in China, federal police representative Mauricio Todeschini in the city of Itajai told AFP, adding that the scheme ran from 2015-2017. The value of the partly “counterfeit” fish was not known but the products had been sold “all around Brazil,” he said...

 

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http://indianexpress.com/article/world/china-exporting-adulterated-fish-to-brazil-brazilian-police-4659949/

 

 

Chinese Chicken Is Headed To America, But It's Really All About The Beef

 

Maria Godoy, Heard on All Things Considered, NPR

May 12, 2017

 

Cooked chicken from birds grown and raised in China soon will be headed to America — in a trade deal that's really about beef.

 

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced Thursday night that the U.S. was greenlighting Chinese chicken imports and getting U.S. beef producers access to China's nearly 1.4 billion consumers. But the deal is raising concerns among critics who point to China's long history of food-safety scandals.

 

The Chinese appetite for beef is huge and growing, but American beef producers have been locked out of that market since a case of mad cow disease cropped up in the U.S. in 2003. In response, many countries, including South Korea, Japan, Mexico and China, banned imports of U.S. beef.

 

China was the only one of those nations to not eventually lift its ban — and that's a big deal.

 

"It's a very big market; it's at least a $2.5 billion market that's being opened up for U.S. beef," Ross said in announcing the trade deal.

 

Many people long had seen China's refusal to lift its ban on U.S. beef imports as a negotiating tactic, a tit for tat aimed at allowing Chinese chicken imports into the United States. The negotiations that led to the new trade deal have been going back and forth for more than a decade, stalled at one point by worries in Congress over China's food-safety practices...

 

... Given the many outbreaks of avian flu China has experienced, there are also worries that if raw Chinese poultry were processed in the U.S., it could potentially contaminate American plants or somehow spread to birds here in the States.

 

Tony Corbo, a senior lobbyist for the food campaign at Food & Water Watch, an environmental advocacy group, has been raising concerns about efforts to open the U.S. market to Chinese chicken imports for years. He questions the Chinese government's ability to enforce food-safety standards, given its poor track record.

 

That record includes rat meat being sold as lamb, oil recovered from drainage ditches in gutters being sold as cooking oil, and baby formula contaminated with melamine that sickened hundreds of thousands of babies and killed six. In 2014, a Shanghai food-processing factory that supplied international restaurant brands including McDonald's and KFC was caught selling stale meat, repackaged with new expiration dates.

 

Corbo points out that last December, China's own Food and Drug Administration reported it had uncovered as many as a half-million cases of food-safety violations just in the first three quarters of 2016...

 

more

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/05/12/528139468/chinese-chicken-is-headed-to-america-but-its-really-all-about-beef

 

 

USDA reorganization plan could reduce food safety protections

 

By Brian Ronholm, Opinion, Food Safety News by Marler Clark

May 18, 2017

 

A seemingly minor component of the USDA reorganization plan released last week could have a negative impact on food safety as the plan gets implemented. Much of the focus has been on the creation of a new undersecretary for trade position, but the plan also calls for the establishment of an interagency committee that would coordinate agricultural trade policy. This committee would be chaired by the new trade undersecretary and would include, among other agencies, the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS).

 

While some coordination between food safety and trade is appropriate, the inclusion of FSIS on such a committee is potentially troubling, giving the appearance that trade is going to have significant influence over food safety priorities at USDA. The public health mission of FSIS should be an equally separate focus within the department, and trade considerations should not impact food safety policy direction.

 

As many know, countries wishing to ship meat and poultry products into the United States have to demonstrate that their food safety inspection system is equivalent to the system here in the U.S. This can be a very deliberative process that includes document submissions, lengthy reviews of regulatory structures, and on-site verification audits.

 

As a result, there sometimes can be tension between FSIS and another USDA sub-agency — the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) — over this equivalency determination process. Some countries have found the FSIS process to be onerous, and have been able to find advocates within FAS, especially when the other country is considering opening their markets to U.S. products.

 

If the role of FSIS on the interagency committee is to merely provide status updates of equivalency applications, it would represent a more appropriate approach that would be consistent with current practice. However, since this panel would be chaired by FAS with FSIS as a member, it gives the appearance that trade will take precedence over food safety.

 

The recent announcement that cooked chicken from China soon would be eligible to be shipped to the U.S. offers an example of this situation. China has teased the re-opening of their market to U.S. beef for a long time only to change their minds frequently; and then the issue became subtly linked to receiving equivalency status for their poultry products. Despite the impression given in some media reports, there was no direct trade of equivalency for U.S. beef access to China; the process was far more nuanced, and FSIS had been working on an analysis of China’s food safety system for processed poultry for years and had recently completed its evaluation. However, the optics of the announcement are undeniable.

 

Given the numerous food safety concerns China has experienced in recent years, an equivalency determination from the U.S. presents an opportunity for China to improve their food safety reputation around the world. Also, the potential of the Chinese market is so immense that those in the U.S. beef industry have exercised extreme patience in waiting for China to re-open them. It appears China may be serious this time, given the granularity of the discussions compared to before, but many who have followed this issue continue to take a wait-and-see approach...

 

more

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2017/05/usda-reorganization-plan-could-reduce-food-safety-protections/