In this file:

 

·         6% of U.S. corn planted

·         Corn States Nowhere Near 2016 Planting Pace

·         Iowa corn planting off to a slow start

 

·         Weekly Outlook: Planting Progress and Implications for Corn and Soybean Acreage

 

 

6% of U.S. corn planted

 

By John Perkins, Brownfield

April 17, 2017

 

The USDA says 6% of this year’s U.S. corn crop is planted, compared to 11% a year ago and the five year average of 9%.

 

Recent rainfall has delayed planting in parts of the Cornbelt, but it’s very early in the season. Also, according to AgriVisor’s Dale Durchholz, the five year average is skewed by 2012’s fast planting pace.

 

The recent rainfall helped the U.S. winter wheat condition rating to improve 1% to 54% good to excellent. 19% of winter wheat has headed, compared to 11% a year ago and 13% typically this time of year...

 

more

http://brownfieldagnews.com/news/6-u-s-corn-planted/

 

 

Corn States Nowhere Near 2016 Planting Pace

 

By Anna McConnell, Successful Farming

Agriculture.com - 4/17/2017

 

Every corn state besides Indiana is behind last year’s planting pace at this point, according to the USDA’s weekly Crop Progress Report.

 

The state of Missouri, in particular, is lagging behind significantly at only 17% planted as of Easter Sunday. Last year, Missouri farmers had already planted 53% of the state’s crop. Farmers did use the above-average temperatures and 4.4 days that were suitable for fieldwork this week to their advantage, bumping Missouri corn planting up 12% in just a week. This week 1% of the state’s planted corn emerged, as well.

 

Indiana has 4% of the state’s total corn acres planted, which is 3% above last year at this time. Indiana growers are still 2% behind the state’s five-year average, though. That’s not surprising as only 3.2 days were suitable for fieldwork in the past seven days, the USDA says.

 

In Nebraska, farmers are right in line with the five-year average pace of planting at 3% planted. In 2016, the state already had 6% of corn planted at this time. Temperatures were warmer than average, and farmers had 4.8 days that were suitable for fieldwork last week, according to the USDA.

 

Illinois farmers...

 

The state of Kansas...

 

In Iowa...

 

Minnesota growers...

 

The states of North Dakota, Michigan, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Ohio...

 

more

http://www.agriculture.com/news/crops/corn-states-nowhere-near-2016-planting-pace

 

 

Iowa corn planting off to a slow start

 

By Ken Anderson, Brownfield

April 17, 2017

 

Corn planting in Iowa is off to a slow start because of wet field conditions across much of the state.

 

The weekly crop progress report says two percent of corn was planted as of Sunday, three days behind the five-year average for mid-April.

 

Forty-two percent of the oat crop has been planted, four days behind average, with ten percent emerged.

 

“Farmers have gotten some planting done when the weather allow, with two percent of the corn and 42 percent of oats now planted, but progress on both remain behind the five-year average,” says Iowa ag secretary Bill Northey. “It looks like wet weather could return this week which would further delay significant planting progress.”

 

Topsoil moisture rated 25 percent surplus and 74 percent adequate, while subsoil levels rated...

 

more

http://brownfieldagnews.com/news/iowa-corn-planting-off-slow-start/

 

 

Weekly Outlook: Planting Progress and Implications for Corn and Soybean Acreage

 

Todd Hubbs, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois

farmdoc daily - April 17, 2017

 

Since the release of the March 31st Prospective Plantings Report and the April WASDE Report, the corn and soybean markets turn their focus to spring planting. The pace of planting reveals expectations that delays in planting may influence acreage decisions. Recent rainfall totals in Corn Belt and Plains states and forecasts for a wetter pattern in western and northern areas of the Corn Belt instigated the annual discussion of the acreage implications of corn and soybean planting progress. The shift to soybean planting intentions and away from feed grains makes the pace of planting of interest this crop year.

 

The Prospective Plantings Report indicated farmer's intentions to plant 89.5 million acres of soybeans in 2017. The six million acre increase in soybean acres over 2016 came at the expense, in many states, of feed grains. When considering corn, sorghum, oats, and barley, the total acreage reduction for feed grain planting intentions indicates approximately 5.6 million fewer acres of feed grains planted in 2017. Corn planting intentions came in at 90 million acres, which is four million acres below 2016 levels. The most recent Crop Progress Report for the week ending April 9 indicated three percent of the corn crop planted which is on par with the pace of planting over the past five years. Continued rain in many areas points to delays in corn planting in many states and merits investigation into the possibilities associated with late planting on acreage decisions.

 

Any ability to characterize late or early planting at a national level creates complications due to geographic variation. Previous work by Irwin, Good, and Tannura (here and here) suggests late planting in the major producing states that impacts national average yield occurs after May 20 for corn and after May 30 for soybeans. This timeframe for considering late planting draws support from planting date studies conducted in Illinois over a decade (here). Using this definition, we look at the past 20 years (since the Freedom to Farm era began) of crops planted late to determine any impact on acreage decisions at the national level. The portion of the crops planted late ranged from four percent (2012) to 21 percent (2011) for corn and six percent (2012) to 43 percent (2011) for soybeans. For the five years since 1997 with the smallest and largest percentages of the crops planted late, we conduct an examination of how the final estimate of planted acreage differed from intentions reported in the USDA's March Prospective Plantings report. Due to a tie for the fifth position for largest late-planted percentage in corn, six observations are used in calculations.

 

In years with the smallest percentage of late planted crop, corn planted acreage exceeded intentions in four years and was less than intentions in one year. Deviations from planting intentions ranged from -691,000 to 1.9 million acres and averaged 939,400 acres. In one of the four years that corn acreage exceeded intentions, soybean acreage exceeded intentions as well. In the five years when the smallest percentage of late planted soybean crop, planted acreage exceeded intentions in one year and was less than intentions in four years. The deviation from intentions ranged from -2.4 million acres to 3.3 million acres and averaged -591,800 acres.

 

In the years when the largest percentage of late planted corn acreage, planted acreage was less than intentions in four years and exceeded intentions in two years. Deviations from planting intentions ranged from -1.9 million to 1.4 million acres and averaged -224,000 acres. In the five years when the largest percentage of late planted soybean acreage, planted acreage was less than intentions in two years and exceeded intentions in three years. Deviations from planting intentions ranged from -1.6 million to 1.4 million acres and averaged 300,000 acres.

 

Producers possess the ability to plant very quickly and still have more than a month to plant corn and six weeks to plant soybeans before planting is considered late by our definition. Currently, the concern is the potential delay in corn planting which may create an incentive to switch to soybean acres and exacerbate the large switch in acreage seen in the planting intentions report. Observations since 1997 suggest that there is a tendency for corn acreage to exceed intentions in years when a small percentage of the crop is planted late. The large variation in the direction and magnitude of acreage deviations from intentions makes it difficult to form expectations on corn acreage for 2017. Deviations in planted acreage of soybeans from intentions provide no clear indication of acreage adjustment based on the lateness of planting

 

document, plus links, references

http://farmdocdaily.illinois.edu/2017/04/planting-progress-implications-corn-soybean-acreage.html