In this file:

 

·         9 Things That Can Happen To Your Body When You Cut Out Red Meat

… there are a number of things that can happen to your body when you cut out red meat, and many of them are positive… according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it couldn't hurt to scale back on all that beef and pork… Curious what will be different once you ditch the food group? Here are nine potential things that could happen to your body when you give up red meat…

 

·         Why You Should Think Twice About Vegetarian and Vegan Diets

… Perhaps the biggest problem with vegetarian and vegan diets, however, is their near total lack of two fat-soluble vitamins: A and D. Fat-soluble vitamins play numerous and critical roles in human health...

 

·         The Scary Mental Health Risks of Going Meatless

Vegetarianism can come with some unexpected side effects.

 

·         The Meat Myth is Dead: Plant-Based Proteins Build Muscle Same as Animal Protein, Study Finds

... The long-standing myth about the necessity of meat for building muscle has been disproven as a new study found plant-based proteins benefit muscle health the same as animal protein...

 

 

9 Things That Can Happen To Your Body When You Cut Out Red Meat

 

By Carina Wolff, Bustle

Feb 14, 2017

 

With all the information we have about the negative health effects of eating red meat, many people are trying to not include it as much in their diet. As with any dietary change, there are a number of things that can happen to your body when you cut out red meat, and many of them are positive. After watching Supersize Me or Forks Over Knives, you may be tempted to take the leap yourself, so it's good to know what you're getting yourself into before giving up those burgers.

 

Red meat consumption has been linked to increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and early death, according to multiple studies. Of course, everything is okay in moderation, but considering the average American consumes 71.2 pounds of red meat per year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it couldn't hurt to scale back on all that beef and pork, even if you aren't giving it up completely or permanently.

 

"If you are thinking of reducing your red meat intake, give it a try, but know that what you are replacing it with matters for your health just as much as what you are removing," says Brigitte Zeitlin, RD over email. "So if you are freeing up some space on your plate, make sure you’re filling it up with vegetables, whole grains and other sources of lean protein like beans, lentils, fish and seafood, tofu, eggs, dairy, or white meat if you aren’t giving up all meat.

 

Curious what will be different once you ditch the food group? Here are nine potential things that could happen to your body when you give up red meat.

 

1 Your Heart Health May Improve …  

 

2 You Might Not Feel As "Heavy" After Meals …

 

3 You'll Probably Consume Less Hormones And Antibiotics …

 

4 You Can Absorb Calcium Better …

 

5 You Might Smell Better …

 

6 It's Possible That You'll Feel Hungrier …

 

7 You Can Reduce Inflammation …

 

8 You May Feel More Confident In The Kitchen …

 

9 You Might Develop Stronger Bones  …

 

more

https://www.bustle.com/p/9-things-that-can-happen-to-your-body-when-you-cut-out-red-meat-35148

 

 

Why You Should Think Twice About Vegetarian and Vegan Diets

 

by Chris Kresser, ChrisKresser.com

February 20, 2014

 

There are many reasons why people choose to go vegetarian or vegan. Some are compelled by the environmental impact of confinement animal feeding operations (CAFO). Others are guided by ethical concerns or religious reasons. I respect these reasons and appreciate anyone who thinks deeply about the social and spiritual impact of their food choices—even if my own exploration of these questions has led me to a different answer.

 

But many choose a vegetarian diet is because they’re under the impression that it’s a healthier choice from a nutritional perspective. It is this last reason that I’d like to address in this article. For the last fifty years, we’ve been told that meat, eggs and animal fats are bad for us, and that we’ll live longer and enjoy superior health if we minimize or avoid them. This idea has been so thoroughly drilled into our head that few people even question it anymore. In fact, if you asked the average person on the street whether a vegetarian or vegan diet is healthier than an omnivorous diet, they’d probably say yes. But is this really true?

 

Plant-based diets emphasize vegetables, which are quite nutrient dense, and fruits, which are somewhat nutrient dense. However, they also typically include large amounts of cereal grains (refined and unrefined) and legumes, both of which are low in bioavailable nutrients and high in anti-nutrients such as phytate, and they eschew organ meats, meats, fish and shellfish, which are among the most nutrient-dense foods you can eat. (1)

 

Vegan diets, in particular, are almost completely devoid of certain nutrients that are crucial for physiological function. Several studies have shown that both vegetarians and vegans are prone to deficiencies in B12, calcium, iron, zinc, the long-chain fatty acids EPA & DHA, and fat-soluble vitamins like A & D.

 

Let’s take a closer look at each of these nutrients on a vegetarian or vegan diet.

 

Vitamin B12

 

B12 deficiency is especially common in vegetarians and vegans...

 

Calcium

 

On paper, calcium intake is similar in vegetarians and omnivores (probably because both eat dairy products), but is much lower in vegans, who are often deficient...

 

Iron

 

Vegetarians and omnivores have similar levels of serum iron, but levels of ferritin—the long-term storage form of iron—are lower in vegetarians than in omnivores...

 

Zinc

 

Overt zinc deficiency is not often seen in Western vegetarians, but their intake often falls below recommendations...

 

EPA and DHA

 

Plant foods do contain linoleic acid (omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3), both of which are considered essential fatty acids. In this context, an essential fatty acid is one that can’t be synthesized by the body and must be obtained in the diet...

 

Fat-soluble vitamins: A and D

 

Perhaps the biggest problem with vegetarian and vegan diets, however, is their near total lack of two fat-soluble vitamins: A and D. Fat-soluble vitamins play numerous and critical roles in human health...

 

But don’t vegetarians live longer than omnivores?

 

At this point you might be thinking, “Well, so what if plant-based diets are lower in some nutrients. Everyone knows vegetarians live longer than omnivores!” While it’s true that some observational studies suggest that vegetarians and vegans enjoy longer lifespans, these studies were plagued by the “healthy user bias”...

 

more

https://chriskresser.com/why-you-should-think-twice-about-vegetarian-and-vegan-diets/

 

 

The Scary Mental Health Risks of Going Meatless

Vegetarianism can come with some unexpected side effects.

 

By Jill Waldbieser, Women's Health

December 2, 2015

 

More and more women are vegging out...of their minds. New research suggests that along with shedding pounds, slashing cancer risk, and boosting life expectancy, vegetarianism could come with lesser-known side effects: Panic attacks. OCD. Depression. WH investigates the puzzling blow of going meatless—and how to stay plant-based without going mental.

 

Her symptoms were sudden and severe. Drew Ramsey's 35-year-old patient had always been fit and active, but her energy had flatlined. When she did manage to drag herself to the gym, it didn't help. She felt anxious and was often on the verge of tears for no reason, even when she was with friends. Worst of all were her panic attacks, a rare occurrence in the past but now so common that she was afraid of losing her job because she had trouble getting out of bed, and she'd become terrified of taking the New York City subway.

 

Ramsey, a Columbia University professor and psychiatrist with 14 years of experience, wanted to put her on medication. His patient demurred. She was so conscious of what she put in her body, she'd even given up meat a year ago, having heard about all the health benefits of vegetarianism. So Ramsey prescribed something else: grass-fed steak.

 

It may sound like an episode of House, but Ramsey had a hunch. He'd seen a dramatic link between mood and food before (he even researched it for his forthcoming book Eat Complete), and guessed that his patient's well-intentioned meat-free diet was the very thing causing her mental deterioration. Sure enough, six weeks after adding animal protein back onto her plate, her energy rebounded and her panic attacks dropped by 75 percent.

 

Her case is far from unique. "I hear from vegetarians every day; they have this terrible depression and anxiety, and they don't understand why," says Lierre Keith, author of The Vegetarian Myth. "People think they're eating a beautiful, righteous diet, but they don't realize there's a potential dark side."

 

It's true that many of America's estimated 8 million vegetarians are drawn to the diet's promise of a healthier weight, heart, and planet. They pass on beef, poultry, and pork, unaware that a growing body of research suggests a link between going meatless and an elevated risk for serious mental disorders.

 

Garden State

 

Paleo aside, it's been decades since meat eating has been considered truly healthy. Practically every day, it seems, a new study emerges showing that vegetarian diets are the key to everything from shedding pounds to beating cancer. One group of California researchers even found evidence that ditching meat can tack more than three years onto your lifespan.

 

The plant-based love has gone well beyond medical opinion—it's become part of a cultural shift. Some 29 million U.S. adults now take part in Meatless Monday. Amazon alone has more than 7,000 vegan cookbooks in its inventory (60 of those are best sellers). Open Table has scores of "top restaurants for vegetarians" lists, highlighting star chefs experimenting with zero-meat meals. Even chains like Wendy's and White Castle are grilling up veggie burgers.

 

It's tough to argue with the science—and with a movement that's been endorsed by everyone from Gandhi to Beyonce. And it's natural to assume that peak mental health and a perpetually blissed-out attitude are just two more side effects of the glowing vegetarian lifestyle.

 

So it was startling last year when Australian researchers revealed that vegetarians reported being less optimistic about the future than meat eaters. What's more, they were 18 percent more likely to report depression and 28 percent more likely to suffer panic attacks and anxiety. A separate German study backs this up, finding that vegetarians were 15 percent more prone to depressive conditions and twice as likely to suffer anxiety disorders.

 

Even the pros find the stats confounding in a chicken-or-egg way...

 

more

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/side-effects-of-vegetarianism

 

 

The Meat Myth is Dead: Plant-Based Proteins Build Muscle Same as Animal Protein, Study Finds

 

by Jill Ettinger, Organic Authority

February 15, 2017

 

If you’re vegan for any length of time, you may hear this common question: “Where do you get your protein? Well, according to science, plants will do you just fine. The long-standing myth about the necessity of meat for building muscle has been disproven as a new study found plant-based proteins benefit muscle health the same as animal protein.

 

The study, published last week in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that the type of protein consumed — be it plant or animal — didn’t matter to muscle mass or strength. Only the amount; those subjects who consumed the least amount of protein had the lowest levels of muscle mass, but type of protein had no impact on muscoskeletal health.

 

The University of Massachusetts Lowell researchers compared the health records of close to 3,000 adult mean and women between the ages of 19 and 72, including detailed dietary questionnaires the subjects completed. Dietary habits, particularly the sources of protein (meat, eggs, fish, chicken, or vegetarian sources like legumes, nuts, or seeds), were compared with lean muscle mass, bone mineral density, and quadriceps strength, “all measures that are important for fitness, health, and better functioning, especially as we get older,” notes Health.com.

 

The conclusion was that increased protein intake from any clean source is directly connected to healthier, stronger muscles, an important consideration as we age and begin to lose muscle mass.

 

Lead study author Kelsey Mangano, PhD, assistant professor of nutritional sciences at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, told Health.com, “As long as a person is exceeding the recommended daily allowance for protein, no matter the source in their diet, they can improve their muscle health.”

 

Of course, plant-based proteins have numerous other benefits over animal products...

 

more, including links

http://www.organicauthority.com/the-meat-myth-is-dead-plant-based-proteins-build-muscle-same-as-animal-protein-study-finds/