In this file:

 

·         Does Plant Protein Build Muscle as Well as Meat?

According to a new study, the answer is yes. Researchers found that vegetarian protein is just as beneficial for muscle mass and strength as animal protein.

 

·         Can plant and algae-based proteins really dethrone meat?

… Plant-based proteins are trendy, with manufacturers adding the macronutrient to products of all types, but that doesn’t mean that they are ready to overtake meat…

 

·         Non-meat Proteins on the Upswing

Plant-based proteins are growing by leaps and bounds

 

 

Does Plant Protein Build Muscle as Well as Meat?

According to a new study, the answer is yes. Researchers found that vegetarian protein is just as beneficial for muscle mass and strength as animal protein.

 

By Amanda MacMillan, Health.com

February 08, 2017

 

Protein helps repair and build muscle—that’s why it’s smart to recover after a hard workout with a smoothie, energy bites, or another high-protein snack. But until now, researchers haven’t been sure whether plant-based protein aids your tired muscles as well as meat. The results of a new study published today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition are good news for both vegetarians and meat eaters: Plant protein and animal protein appear to benefit muscle health equally.

 

Researchers looked at the health records of nearly 3,000 men and women ages 19 to 72, as well as food questionnaires that the participants filled out. The researchers estimated the participants’ total protein intake as well as their dietary percentages of protein from specific sources, such as fast food, full-fat or low-fat dairy, red meat, fish, chicken, and legumes. They also looked at participants’ lean muscle mass, bone mineral density, and quadriceps strength—all measures that are important for fitness, health, and better functioning, especially as we get older. 

 

When the researchers compared this data, they found that people who consumed the least amount of protein overall also had the lowest measures of muscle mass and strength. But the type of protein people ate didn’t seem to matter: After the researchers adjusted for other factors, they found the differences in protein sources had no impacts on musculoskeletal health, for men or for women.

 

According to the study authors, these results suggest that eating more protein is related to better muscle health. This becomes especially important in middle-age and later in life, they add, since people tend to lose muscle as they get older. (Protein intake did not have a significant effect on bone-mineral density in this study, although it has in previous research.)

 

Lead author Kelsey Mangano, PhD, assistant professor of nutritional sciences at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, says the study delivers a message that meat and veggie lovers can both celebrate: “As long as a person is exceeding the recommended daily allowance for protein, no matter the source in their diet, they can improve their muscle health,” she says.

 

In other words, people who want to go meatless can still build muscle with the help of quinoa, peas, nuts, beans, and soy. And if you prefer to refuel after exercise with a turkey and cheese sandwich? That works too...

 

more, including links

http://www.health.com/nutrition/vegetarian-protein-animal-protein-build-muscle

 

  

Can plant and algae-based proteins really dethrone meat?

 

Keith Loria, FoodDive

Feb. 13, 2017

 

Dive Brief:

 

·         The world’s population is expected to reach 9.9 billion by 2050, pushing many food industry players to search for sustainable food sources to feed the masses, according to a release in SCIAD Newswire.

·         Minh Tsai, founder of Hodo Soy Beanery, said in the release that alternative protein development has increased substantially in the last two years. By focusing on education, transparency and taste, these foods can overtake animal-based proteins.

·         Vishal Vasishth, co-founder of Obvious Ventures, noted in the release that his company has continued to invest in startups working to increase the appeal of plant-based proteins. Vasishth also feels that consumer demand will increase with the introduction of better tasting products.

 

Dive Insight:

 

Plant-based proteins are trendy, with manufacturers adding the macronutrient to products of all types, but that doesn’t mean that they are ready to overtake meat.

 

Some food analysts are doubtful that these alt-protein choices are going to make people forget about meat and other favorite proteins. However, if plant and algae-protein products find similar flavor profiles, it could help the category capture more market share...

 

more

http://www.fooddive.com/news/can-plant-and-algae-based-proteins-really-dethrone-meat/435913/

 

 

Non-meat Proteins on the Upswing

Plant-based proteins are growing by leaps and bounds

 

By Kathy Hayden, Progressive Grocer

February 13, 2017

 

Atkins? Paleo? Gluten-free? While dieters and athletes debate the virtues of different types of high-protein eating, protein suppliers are having their own debates. What’s the next protein-loaded super grain, like quinoa? Is whey the way to go, or are legumes loaded with more power? Nutritional Outlook predicts that in 2017, dairy proteins and plant proteins “may be headed toward new levels of tension.”

 

Each kind of protein has its pros and cons, but “after years of slowing growth, whey protein actually experienced shrinking year-over-year sales this past year,” reports Nutritional Outlook. “Plant-protein sales, on the other hand, continued to grow at a steady clip, both when used alone and in combination with animal proteins.”

 

As with most ways of eating, variety is the spice of life. For those who like to eat their plant proteins as opposed to drinking them, Chef Andrea Nordby adds protein-rich hemp and chia seeds in unexpected places. “We sneak them into dressings, crusts and use [them] as a base for fritters,” says Nordby, head chef at Boston-based Purple Carrot, a vegan meal kit service. “We cook with a healthy amount of nuts, quinoa, tofu and tempeh too. While we certainly pay attention to protein when creating meals and have a measure we want to hit, we really focus on creating a balanced plate.”

 

Grocerant-Ready Ideas:

 

more

http://www.progressivegrocer.com/departments/grocerant/non-meat-proteins-upswing