In this file:

 

·         NCBA on UN climate report

The director of sustainable beef research with NCBA says the U.N.’s recent climate change report is not saying people should stop eating meat, as many in the media are reporting… She says there are areas of the world that emit more greenhouse gasses per unit of production than the U.S. – but they also need more meat production to feed their citizens…

 

·         IPCC report encourages a move to plant-based diets, so how sustainable is Australian meat?

… It's about what we eat, but also how it's grown…

 

·         UN climate report: Change land use to avoid a hungry future

... "The cycle is accelerating," said NASA climate scientist Cynthia Rosenzweig, a co-author of the report… If people change their diets, reducing red meat and increasing plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables and seeds, the world can save as much as another 15% of current emissions by mid-century. It would also make people more healthy, Rosenzweig said…

 

·         UN flags need to reduce meat consumption to curb land use impact on global warming

Global meat consumption must fall to curb global warming, reduce growing strains on land and water and improve food security, health and biodiversity, a United Nations report on the effects of climate change concluded… 

 

 

 

NCBA on UN climate report

 

By Julie Harker, Brownfield

August 9, 2019

 

The director of sustainable beef research with NCBA says the U.N.’s recent climate change report is not saying people should stop eating meat, as many in the media are reporting.

 

Sara Place points out that the report takes a global view.  She says there are areas of the world that emit more greenhouse gasses per unit of production than the U.S. – but they also need more meat production to feed their citizens…

 

“It’s more about what we would call the supply-side changes and in helping people get more productive and increase their production in an efficient manner is going to have a lot bigger impact than dietary change.”

 

Place says the UN report is not a criticism of U.S. livestock production but about making production worldwide better for the climate...

 

more, including audio [12:54 min.] 

https://brownfieldagnews.com/news/ncba-on-un-climate-report/

 

 

IPCC report encourages a move to plant-based diets, so how sustainable is Australian meat?

 

By the Specialist Reporting Team's Penny Timms, ABC News Australia

Aug 9, 2019

 

Talk has once again turned to whether we need to change our diets to help the planet.

 

The message is, essentially: Yes, it would help.

 

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) issued its latest Special Report on Climate Change and Land this week.

 

It encourages people around the world to boost their intake of plant-based foods and to switch to more sustainably produced meat.

 

Australian healthy eating guides already recommend a well-balanced diet where meat is the support act, not the main event.

 

This report backs that thinking.

 

It's about what we eat, but also how it's grown

 

The IPCC report states that diversifying existing food systems can reduce the risks of climate change.

 

When we talk about balanced diets full of low greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting foods, we're talking:

 

·         Coarse grains

·         Legumes

·         Fruits and vegetables

·         Nuts and seeds

 

That list can also include animal-sourced food that has been produced in a resilient and low-GHG-emitting way. Eating more of these foods could work to mitigate climate change.

 

The report reads: "Transitions towards low-GHG-emission diets may be influenced by local production practices, technical and financial barriers and associated livelihoods and cultural habits."

 

The IPCC's co-chairman said the panel was not advising people how to eat, but simply pointing out some diets caused more pollution than others.

 

According to the World Economic Forum, the US, Australia, and Argentina are the world's largest consumers of beef on a per-capita basis.

 

In saying that, vegetarian diets aren't perfect. If everyone was to switch to a plant-only diet, that would also put pressure on resources.

 

But the IPCC said the way we produced food needed to change to become more sustainable.

 

What does it mean for Australia?

 

Not as much as it means for other nations.

 

The IPCC report suggested meat-eaters should think about where their protein came from: How was it raised? What did it eat and where did that food come from?

 

Australia's beef production practices are, relatively, better than some because most Australian livestock is grass-fed.

 

Grass is less gas-inducing than other types of feed.

 

Australia's primary producers also help to manage the land. Without their maintenance, other effects like noxious weeds, pest animals, and fire could be damaging.

 

On the flip side, even grass-fed cattle are inefficient when it comes to the use of resources:

 

more

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-10/ipcc-recommends-eating-less-meat-but-australian-farms-different/11398884

 

 

UN climate report: Change land use to avoid a hungry future

 

Associated Press

via Fox News - Aug 8, 2019

 

GENEVA (AP) — Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the Earth's land and the way people use the land is making global warming worse, a new United Nations scientific report says. That creates a vicious cycle which is already making food more expensive, scarcer and less nutritious.

 

"The cycle is accelerating," said NASA climate scientist Cynthia Rosenzweig, a co-author of the report. "The threat of climate change affecting people's food on their dinner table is increasing."

 

But if people change the way they eat, grow food and manage forests, it could help save the planet from a far warmer future, scientists said.

 

Earth's land masses, which are only 30 percent of the globe, are warming twice as fast as the planet as a whole. While heat-trapping gases are causing problems in the atmosphere, the land has been less talked about as part of climate change. A special report, written by more than 100 scientists and unanimously approved by diplomats from nations around the world Thursday at a meeting in Geneva, proposed possible fixes and made more dire warnings.

 

"The way we use land is both part of the problem and also part of the solution," said Valerie Masson-Delmotte, a French climate scientist who co-chairs one of the panel's working groups. "Sustainable land management can help secure a future that is comfortable."

 

Scientists at Thursday's press conference emphasized both the seriousness of the problem and the need to make societal changes soon...

 

... "The stability of food supply is projected to decrease as the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather events that disrupt food chains increases," the report said...

 

... If people change their diets, reducing red meat and increasing plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables and seeds, the world can save as much as another 15% of current emissions by mid-century. It would also make people more healthy, Rosenzweig said.

 

The science panel said they aren't telling people what to eat because that's a personal choice...

 

more

https://www.foxnews.com/science/un-climate-report-change-land-use-to-avoid-a-hungry-future

 

 

UN flags need to reduce meat consumption to curb land use impact on global warming

 

By Nina Chestney & Stephanie Nebehay, Reuters

via Canadian Cattlemen - August 8, 2019

 

London/Geneva | Reuters — Global meat consumption must fall to curb global warming, reduce growing strains on land and water and improve food security, health and biodiversity, a United Nations report on the effects of climate change concluded.

 

Although the report stopped short of explicitly advocating going meat-free, it called for big changes to farming and eating habits to limit the impact of population growth and changing consumption patterns on stretched land and water resources.

 

Plant-based foods and sustainable animal-sourced food could free up several million square kilometres of land by 2050 and cut 0.7 to eight gigatonnes a year of carbon dioxide equivalent, the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said.

 

“There are certain kinds of diets that have a lower carbon footprint and put less pressure on land,” Jim Skea, professor at London’s Imperial College, said on Thursday.

 

The IPCC met this week in Geneva to finalize its report which should help to guide governments meeting this year in Chile on ways to implement the 2015 Paris Agreement.

 

“The IPCC does not recommend people’s diets… Dietary choices are very often shaped or influenced by local production practices and cultural habits,” Skea, who is one of the report’s authors, told reporters in Geneva.

 

Land can be both a source and sink of carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas blamed for global warming, and better land management can help to tackle climate change, the IPCC said.

 

But it is not the only solution and cutting emissions from all sectors is essential to quickly curtail global warming.

 

“The window for making these changes is closing fast. If there is further delay in reducing emissions, we will miss the opportunity to successfully manage the climate change transition in the land sector,” it said.

 

Since the pre-industrial era, land surface air temperature has risen by 1.53 C, twice as much as the global average temperature (0.87 C), causing more heatwaves, droughts and heavy rain, as well as land degradation and desertification.

 

Human use directly affects more than 70 per cent of the global, ice-free land surface and agriculture accounts for 70 per cent of freshwater use, the IPCC added in the report.

 

Agriculture, forestry and other land use activities accounted for 23 per cent of total net man-made greenhouse gas emissions during 2007-2016. When pre- and post-production activity in the food system are included, that rises to up to 37 per cent.

 

Last year the IPCC’s first special report warned that keeping the Earth’s temperature rise to 1.5 C, rather than the 2 C target agreed under the Paris accord, required rapid change across society.

 

Food security ...

 

Forest factor ...

 

more

https://www.canadiancattlemen.ca/daily/un-flags-need-to-cut-meat-to-curb-land-use-impact-on-global-warming/