In this file:

 

·         Animal rights conference focused on liberation, not animal welfare

·         Is Veganism Enough? The Truth about Animal Rights Activism

·         Animal Ag Alliance Releases Report on 2019 Animal Rights Conference and Its Goal to Create a "Vegan World by 2026"

 

 

Animal rights conference focused on liberation, not animal welfare

Speakers also focused on the use of “undercover” videos and the media to damage the reputation of animal agriculture and reach their goals.

 

Source: Animal Agriculture Alliance

via National Hog Farmer - Aug 07, 2019

 

The Animal Agriculture Alliance has released a report detailing observations from the Animal Rights National Conference, held July 25 through July 28 in Alexandria, Va. The event was organized by the Farm Animal Rights Movement and sponsored by Mercy for Animals, The Save Movement, Compassion Over Killing and The Humane League, along with other animal rights extremist groups.

 

“Animal rights extremists are becoming increasingly aggressive in their efforts to end animal agriculture,” says Kay Johnson Smith, Alliance president and CEO. “Releasing reports from major activist conferences enables everyone in animal agriculture to prepare for strategies and tactics targeting their livelihood.”

 

Similar to last year’s conference, speakers made it clear their vision is animal liberation, not promoting animal welfare. “There is no such thing as humane slaughter and anyone who tells you differently is simply lying,” said Michael Budkie of Stop Animal Exploitation Now. “We need to say that all animal agriculture is cruel and wrong,” said Karen Davis of United Poultry Concerns. Demetria Atkinson of Redefine Your Mind argued “Animals are people too.”

 

A key theme of the conference was the desire to create a vegan world by 2026 to save the environment, but many activists had doubts. “Activism is so sad right now; when I look at our movement, I am incredibly disappointed,” said Lauren Ornelas of The Food Empowerment Project. “We vegans carry a heavy burden. No matter how hard we work, we will likely never see the end of it,” said Melanie Joy of Beyond Carnism. “We are not even close to being on the cusp of global veganism,” said Bruce Friedrich of The Good Food Institute.

 

Attendees at the conference were encouraged to pressure restaurants and retailers and make it seem like a lot of people are asking for vegan meals by blitzing companies on social media, by mail and in-person. “Make sure you tag [brands] in the photo so that all they see is consumer demand for vegan [products],” said Laura Cascada of Compassion Over Killing. Cascada also urged conference attendees to write post cards so they could have “several hundred post cards to dump on the front step of [one restaurant chain] at some point.” In a workshop at the conference, The Humane League asked attendees to write birthday cards to the CEO of a major restaurant chain saying, “This will be the meanest card you’ll ever write.” While talking about corporate campaigns, Kelly Myer of The Humane League said, “We surround buildings so that employees have to see and feel guilt anytime they leave” and “An incremental approach is used to gradually switch companies over to veganism.”

 

Speakers also focused on the use of “undercover” videos and the media to damage the reputation of animal agriculture and reach their goals. “Investigations are the single most powerful tool to expose the inherent cruelties in large-scale animal agriculture,” said William Rivas-Rivas of Animal Equality. “Make sure you start with something dramatic...That’s much more likely to go viral,” said Jane Velez-Mitchell of Jane UnChained News Network.

 

Also speaking at the conference were:

 

more

https://www.nationalhogfarmer.com/agenda/animal-rights-conference-focused-liberation-not-animal-welfare

 

 

Is Veganism Enough? The Truth about Animal Rights Activism

 

Matthew Zampa, Sentient Media

August 7, 2019

 

Just like you and I suffer, so do the billions of animals trapped on factory farms and in animal exploitation facilities. If you ask animal rights activist Amy Soranno, doing nothing is no longer an option.

 

The amount of suffering overlooked so that people can eat, wear, and use animals is unfathomable. Over 150 million animals are killed for food around the world every day – just on land. Including wild-caught and farmed fish, we get a daily total closer to 3 billion animals killed. They live lives of utter misery, and it’s time we gave them a voice.

 

After years spent struggling with her own chronic health conditions, animal rights activist and Meat the Victims organizer Amy Soranno knows that doing nothing for animals is no longer an option.

 

“Let’s imagine that you’re walking down the sidewalk and you see someone with their cute little puppy,” said Soranno in front of the crowd of animal lovers at the VegFest in Victoria, British Columbia. “Imagine that person is punching and kicking that little dog. How many of you would cross the street to help that dog?

 

“What if that dog was being abused behind a wall? You can hear the dog yelping. Day after day the abuse continues. How many of you would still do whatever it took to help that dog?”

 

If there were a show of hands, it would undeniably be in favor of helping the abused dog. That should come as no surprise. We all love animals. Almost no one will deny that. But there’s a big difference – for most people, at least – between advocating for the animals they call their companions, like dogs and cats, and the animals being raised and slaughtered for food.

 

“What if that puppy was a piglet?”

 

Piglets suffer behind the walls and closed doors of their abusers, too. In Canada, where Soranno is from, approximately 21 million pigs have been killed on factory farms and in slaughterhouses already this year.

 

Footage from countless factory farm investigations shows mother pigs and piglets crammed in tiny crates where they are unable to move or care for each other properly. Mother pigs struggle to walk on the slatted floor. Others die slowly where they collapse. Dead pigs are found rotting in their pens and piled in dumpsters. Soranno knows the look, the horrible smell, and the sound of those wailing piglets all too well.

 

On April 28, 2019, she led a group of 49 Meat the Victims activists into Excelsior Hog Farm, where more than 1,000 mother pigs were found suffering miserable lives in crates at one of British Columbia’s largest pig farms. Another 200 activists gathered outside.

 

The protests were part of the animal rights movement’s effort to create more transparency and accountability in the animal agriculture industry, not just in Canada, but the United States, Australia, Britain, and anywhere there are farm animals suffering.

 

In a sweeping act of defiance, activists can be seen sprinting past the “No Trespassing” signs and attempting to gain access to the pig farm. The second they entered Excelsior Hog Farm, everyone, including Soranno, knew they would likely face criminal charges. They also knew that they had a moral responsibility to the animals suffering inside.

 

“That’s okay,” said Soranno. “We’re challenging the law. That’s what we came here to do.”

 

After the action at Excelsior Hog Farm, Soranno was taken into custody. The rest of the activists walked peacefully off the property, many with tears streaming down their faces, holding peace signs and white flowers in their hands.

 

Footage from the farm made international headlines, despite being particularly hard to watch.

 

“If the graphic images of animals haunt you – good,” she said. “Do something about it.”

 

She certainly is...

 

more

https://sentientmedia.org/veganism-animal-rights-are-we-doing-enough/

 

 

Animal Ag Alliance Releases Report on 2019 Animal Rights Conference and Its Goal to Create a "Vegan World by 2026"

 

Source - Animal Agriculture Alliance

via Oklahoma Farm Report - 07 Aug 2019

 

The Animal Agriculture Alliance released a report today detailing observations from the Animal Rights National Conference, held July 25 through July 28 in Alexandria, Virginia. The event was organized by the Farm Animal Rights Movement and sponsored by Mercy for Animals, The Save Movement, Compassion Over Killing and The Humane League, along with other animal rights extremist groups.

 

“Animal rights extremists are becoming increasingly aggressive in their efforts to end animal agriculture,” said Kay Johnson Smith, Alliance president and CEO. “Releasing reports from major activist conferences enables everyone in animal agriculture to prepare for strategies and tactics targeting their livelihood.”

 

Similar to last year’s conference, speakers made it clear their vision is animal liberation, not promoting animal welfare. “There is no such thing as humane slaughter and anyone who tells you differently is simply lying,” said Michael Budkie of Stop Animal Exploitation Now. “We need to say that all animal agriculture is cruel and wrong,” said Karen Davis of United Poultry Concerns. Demetria Atkinson of Redefine Your Mind argued “Animals are people too.”

 

A key theme of the conference was the desire to create a vegan world by 2026 to save the environment, but many activists had doubts. “Activism is so sad right now; when I look at our movement, I am incredibly disappointed,” said Lauren Ornelas of The Food Empowerment Project. “We vegans carry a heavy burden. No matter how hard we work, we will likely never see the end of it,” said Melanie Joy of Beyond Carnism. “We are not even close to being on the cusp of global veganism,” said Bruce Friedrich of The Good Food Institute.

 

Attendees at the conference were encouraged to pressure restaurants and retailers and make it seem like a lot of people are asking for vegan meals by blitzing companies on social media, by mail and in-person. “Make sure you tag (brands) in the photo so that all they see is consumer demand for vegan (products),” said Laura Cascada of Compassion Over Killing. Cascada also urged conference attendees to write post cards so they could have “several hundred post cards to dump on the front step of (one restaurant chain) at some point.” In a workshop at the conference, The Humane League asked attendees to write birthday cards to the CEO of a major restaurant chain saying, “This will be the meanest card you’ll ever write.” While talking about corporate campaigns, Kelly Myer of The Humane League said, “We surround buildings so that employees have to see and feel guilt anytime they leave” and “An incremental approach is used to gradually switch companies over to veganism.”

 

Speakers also focused on the use of “undercover” videos and the media to damage the reputation of animal agriculture and reach their goals...

 

more

http://www.oklahomafarmreport.com/wire/news/2019/08/01271_AnimalAgAllianceActivistReport08072019_112725.php