In this file:

 

·         Nestle may extend plant-based burger partnership with McDonald’s

… Nestle could expand its plant-based burger sales partnership with fast food chain McDonald’s beyond Germany and is also looking for other partners, the Swiss food giant’s head said on Tuesday…

 

·         Why a plant-based McDonald’s burger is no slam dunk

Even as competitors push meat-free burgers, the product might not be ready for the giant’s domestic market, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

 

·         Nestlé poised to launch plant-based ‘Awesome Burger’ to compete with Impossible Foods, Beyond Meat

… Each 4oz Awesome Burger – which contains textured pea protein, vital wheat gluten, coconut oil, and canola oil – contains 28g protein (vs 19g/20g for Impossible/Beyond), 6g fiber (vs 3g for Impossible/Beyond), 8g saturated fat (vs 8g/5g for Impossible/Beyond), and 400mg of sodium (vs 370-380mg for Impossible/Beyond)… 

 

 

 

Nestle may extend plant-based burger partnership with McDonald’s

 

·         The market for meat substitutes could soar to $140 billion over the next decade, according to Barclays, as many health- and climate-conscious consumers seek to reduce their meat consumption.

·         Nestle launched its plant-based Incredible Burger in April under the Garden Gourmet brand in several European countries.

·         Switzerland-based Nestle has also announced plans to launch a plant-based burger in the U.S. later this year, where it will compete with products made by Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods.

 

Reuters

via CNBC - Jun 11 2019

 

Nestle could expand its plant-based burger sales partnership with fast food chain McDonald’s beyond Germany and is also looking for other partners, the Swiss food giant’s head said on Tuesday.

 

“McDonald’s is an exciting and big customer, but it is not the only option and we have quite good capacity to cope with a (possible) extension beyond Germany,” Marco Settembri, the Chief Executive of Nestle’s Europe, Middle East and North Africa business said.

 

The market for meat substitutes could soar to $140 billion over the next decade, according to Barclays, as many health- and climate-conscious consumers seek to reduce their meat consumption.

 

Nestle launched its plant-based Incredible Burger in April under the Garden Gourmet brand in several European countries. The same month, McDonald’s started selling the patties as “Big Vegan TS” in its 1,500 restaurants in Germany.

 

Early results of the launch in Germany were promising, Settembri said, and Nestle and McDonald’s were discussing next steps.

 

“For both (of us), if we do it, if we go ahead, we want to do it right. We have capacity of course, but we really need to plan it and we need to do it well,” he told a Deutsche Bank conference.

 

Nestle is also working with other operators to supply products to business customers but Settembri insisted that the company’s retail channel, a “historical strength”, was very important as well...

 

more, including links

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/06/11/nestle-may-extend-plant-based-burger-partnership-with-mcdonalds.html

 

 

Why a plant-based McDonald’s burger is no slam dunk

Even as competitors push meat-free burgers, the product might not be ready for the giant’s domestic market, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

 

By Jonathan Maze, Opinion, Restaurant Business

Jun. 11, 2019

 

Analysts and others have been wondering when McDonald’s would add a plant-based burger in the U.S. almost from the moment that Burger King announced its test of the Impossible Whopper back in March.

 

The questions have come faster more recently, including last week, when analysts asked about McDonald’s on the first earnings call for plant-based meat maker Beyond Meat—where former McDonald’s CEO Don Thompson is a board member.

 

McDonald’s has a plant-based burger in Germany called the Big Vegan TS. According to Reuters, McDonald’s is in talks with Nestle, the company that makes the patties for that burger, on expanding their partnership. And Nestle, according to Reuters, wants to bring a plant-based burger to the U.S.

 

A McDonald’s vegetarian burger in the U.S. would be a massive win for consumers who have been pushing the idea for years, placing a plant-based entree item squarely into the mainstream. It would also be a big victory for whatever supplier gets the contract.

 

Rivals appear to be generating strong early sales with their plant-based offerings, particularly Burger King.

 

But there are plenty of reasons why McDonald’s is taking this wait-and-see approach to the plant-based burger market.

 

For one thing, there is the practical matter of grill space.

 

To start producing a plant-based burger, McDonald’s locations would likely have to reserve a grill specifically for that product. That means less space for existing burgers and breakfast products.

 

While plant-based burgers might generate sales in the short term, it remains to be seen whether this is a long-term sales strategy. Devoting grill space to something that might be a flash in the pan is a major risk.

 

“We’ve got to make sure the consumer trend is sustaining,” McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook told analysts last month, according to a transcript on financial services site Sentieo.

 

It’s a legitimate concern. Though products from Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat have been praised as higher-quality plant-based burger options than many predecessors, there is a long history of chains pushing vegetarian or healthy options, only to shift back to their old habits.

 

In 2013, for instance, Burger King generated strong sales with its well-reviewed, healthier Satisfries, only to pull the product off its menu less than a year later after consumers went for the traditional fries...

 

more, including links

https://www.restaurantbusinessonline.com/financing/why-plant-based-mcdonalds-burger-no-slam-dunk

 

 

Nestlé poised to launch plant-based ‘Awesome Burger’ to compete with Impossible Foods, Beyond Meat

 

Elaine Watson | Food Navigator

via Genetic Literacy Project | June 12, 2019

 

Nestlé’s new ‘cook from raw’ plant-based Awesome Burger (launching in the fall under the Sweet Earth brand in retail and foodservice) has similar levels of sodium and saturated fat to the Impossible Burger and the Beyond Burger, but has significantly more protein and fiber, say Sweet Earth founders Brian and Kelly Swette.

 

Each 4oz Awesome Burger – which contains textured pea protein, vital wheat gluten, coconut oil, and canola oil – contains 28g protein (vs 19g/20g for Impossible/Beyond), 6g fiber (vs 3g for Impossible/Beyond), 8g saturated fat (vs 8g/5g for Impossible/Beyond), and 400mg of sodium (vs 370-380mg for Impossible/Beyond).

 

 

By leveraging Nestlé’s buying power, Sweet Earth will also be able to offer a competitively priced product that can scale rapidly, claimed Kelly, who said teaming up with the world’s biggest food company was one of the most effective ways of accelerating the kind of change many activists want to see in the food system...

 

more

https://geneticliteracyproject.org/2019/06/12/nestle-poised-to-launch-plant-based-awesome-burger-to-compete-with-impossible-foods-beyond-meat/