In this file:

 

·         Farmers urged to take action on complacency regarding animal rights activist prosecution

… calling on farmers and allies to contact their government representative over the increase in animal rights activists’ activities and the lack of prosecution of charges…

 

·         Repeat offender farm invasion activists escape with $1300 and $1000 fines

… Yet again, they walk away with only another fine and still no conviction,” Mr Bella said...

 

·         Farmer’s Wifee: When the activist threat to your farm grows more real

·         All charges dropped against animal rights activist in pig farm break-in

 

 

Farmers urged to take action on complacency regarding animal rights activist prosecution

 

RealAgriculture

May 8, 2019

 

The Ontario Federation of Agriculture and its members are calling on farmers and allies to contact their government representative over the increase in animal rights activists’ activities and the lack of prosecution of charges.

 

There has been a marked increase in activist activity on farms and roadsides in Ontario over the past few months. At the same time, news of a well-known activist having charges dismissed against them has caused anger and frustration both within the farming and legal community alike.

 

OFA is encouraging anyone who is concerned by the lack of follow through by Ontario’s district courts on this matter to contact their MPP, the premier, the solicitor general, and the minister of agriculture to voice their concern and call for more action by the legal system.

 

Related:

 

    Animal rights activists eluding punishment

    Is your farm ready for activists?

    Be a good witness

 

document, plus links

https://www.realagriculture.com/2019/05/farmers-urged-to-take-action-on-complacency-regarding-animal-rights-activist-prosecution/

 

 

Repeat offender farm invasion activists escape with $1300 and $1000 fines

 

Beef Central (Australia)

May 9, 2019

 

TWO animal activists who led an invasion of a Darling Downs feedlot in March received fines of $1300 and $1000, but escaped jail time following a hearing in the Toowoomba Magistrates Court this morning.

 

Animal activist Leah Ava Whetton, 29, led more than 100 protesters into the Lemon Tree cattle feedlot and dairy near Millmerran on Queensland’s Darling Downs.

 

Ms Whetton did not appear in court, but had her case heard ex parte by magistrate Viviana Keegan.

 

The magistrate explained that being dealt with ex parte, only a fine could be imposed and no conviction could be recorded.

 

Both Ms Whetton and her co-accused, Jessie Simpson-Ross, 26, pleaded guilty to one count of unlawfully entering farmland on March 23.

 

“It was part of a protest by vegan activists, however they were clearly trespassing and they knew they were doing so,” the magistrate said during the hearing.

 

“There are strict biosecurity measures employed by the business. They were told by the manager to leave, and in failing to do so they not only disrupted the business but created a biosecurity risk.”

 

As the leader of the protest, Ms Whetton was given a $1300 fine and Ms Simpson-Ross a $1000 fine. Both escaped conviction, and received no good behaviour bond or community service.

 

All the attention, no long-term ramifications

 

Speaking in response to today’s Toowoomba hearing, the Green Shirts Movement national coordinator, Marty Bella said his organisation was furious that yet again, the legal system had not delivered a fair and just punishment to the vegan extremist farm invaders.

 

“These militant invaders are turning up and potentially ruining lives with not only biosecurity risks, but the mental trauma and distress they bring to their targets. Yet again, they walk away with only another fine and still no conviction,” Mr Bella said...

 

more

https://www.beefcentral.com/news/repeat-offender-farm-invasion-activists-escape-with-1300-and-1000-fines/

 

 

Farmer’s Wifee: When the activist threat to your farm grows more real

 

By Krista Stauffer, The Farmer’s Wifee

via AgDaily - May 08, 2019

 

I have watched helplessly as farmers in Australia are continually harassed by animal rights extremists. Hundreds of people will show up on farms — harassing farmers, chaining themselves to equipment, stealing animals, etc. It is completely out of control. So much so that a couple had to close their small family store and farm due to continuous harassment.

 

In a recent post, a friend and fellow farmer shared how this is now happening in Canada. She states:

 

“Yesterday, 200 activists descended on a family farm in Abbotsford, just 45 minutes from our farm. (This hog farm had recently been the target of a trespasser who had accessed their barns at night, recording video, and submitted the video to PETA. In true PETA fashion, the clips were highly edited before a short segment was released to the world.) The activists took over the farm early Sunday morning, entering the barn illegally, and set up camp. The police were summoned, but the activists refused to leave until the media had been invited to the farm to document the protest and the inside of the barns. The farmers and law enforcement acquiesced and the farmer led a media tour of his facility. The farm’s vet also made a special visit to inspect the animals. After the tour, the activists left the barn and the 35 who had entered the barn were arrested.”

 

So let me get this straight, 200 people showed up on a farm because they watched some YouTube videos and decided they didn’t like how this farmer (a complete stranger) farmed? They would not leave until their demands of media coverage and entry into the barns (with the exception of 35 who went in without permission) were met? AND everyone obliged? Oh hell no. This is not OK. Disagreeing with someone doesn’t give anyone the right to do this. Disagreeing with someone doesn’t make a mob of 200 people showing up at someone’s home, place of business, or farm OK.

 

Folks, people have already been threatening to do the very same thing in America on family farms like mine. Regardless of whether you think it will happen to you or not, this is the world we now live in, and you need to make sure you are prepared.

 

Here are a few things you should consider:

 

more

https://www.agdaily.com/insights/activists-on-farms/

 

 

All charges dropped against animal rights activist in pig farm break-in

 

Gerry Dewan, CTV London (Canada)

May 1, 2019

 

For the second time in less than a month Jenny McQueen and her supporters gathered in front of the London courthouse, with McQueen facing charges of break and enter and mischief.

 

McQueen is a member Direct Action Everywhere (DxE), an animal rights organization that opposes eating meat and, more specifically, factory farms.

 

In March 2018, McQueen posted a video online after she entered the Adare Pork breeding facility north of Lucan, Ont. describing conditions inside as cruel, and actually taking one of the piglets.

 

 She says, "Family farms are not cute enterprises anymore. They're all big, white sheds in the countryside with animals stuffed inside."

 

Minutes after entering the courthouse on Wednesday, McQueen came out having learned the Crown had dropped all charges, telling the court there wasn't a reasonable chance of conviction.

 

That decision came despite the video McQueen recorded, which clearly showed her inside the facility and taking one of the piglets.

 

"While it's a victory for animal activism, it's not such a victory for the mother pigs and for all those animals in Canada, and around the world that are being hidden behind factory walls," McQueen says.

 

Among more than a dozen people on hand to support McQueen was Anita Krajnc, the woman charged, and also cleared, after she gave water to pigs headed to a slaughterhouse in Burlington in June of 2019.

 

She says, "The public has a lot of power. They're consumers, so if they start eating plant-based foods then they're not contributing to the suffering."

 

After learning her fate, McQueen and her supporters returned to the Adare Pork facility, laying flowers at the entrance.

 

About 30 metres down the lane heading to Adare was a security detail and a representative of Ontario Pork, keeping an eye on the activities of the animal rights activists.

 

Stacey Ash, the communications manager for Ontario Pork, says, "For anyone who values private property, who understands that farms really are, not just businesses but homes as well, it's very troubling to know that was not prosecutable."

 

Ash says pork producers are closely regulated and maintain high standards. She also points out that Adare Pork ownership has change since McQueen went inside the facility…

 

more

https://london.ctvnews.ca/all-charges-dropped-against-animal-rights-activist-in-pig-farm-break-in-1.4403906