In this file:

 

·         NPPC Cancels 2019 World Pork Expo As Precaution

Risk of African Swine Fever Introduction to U.S. Herd Considered Negligible; Decision Made Out of An Abundance of Caution  

 

·         Live swine show to proceed despite World Pork Expo cancellation

NSR staff members along with the Certified Pedigree Swine and American Berkshire Association are working diligently to confirm event logistics and details for the live hog show.

 

·         Risk of ASF Introduction Through U.S. Airports Increases

A University of Minnesota analysis has shown the risk of ASF entering the United States by way of illegally imported meat through U.S. airports has increased by 183 percent since the spread of disease into China, East Asia, and Western Europe...

 

 

 

NPPC Cancels 2019 World Pork Expo As Precaution

Risk of African Swine Fever Introduction to U.S. Herd Considered Negligible; Decision Made Out of An Abundance of Caution  

 

Source: National Pork Producers Council (NPPC)

Apr 10, 2019

 

Des Moines, IA, April 10, 2019 – The National Pork Producers Council's board of directors today announced its decision to cancel World Pork Expo 2019 out of an abundance of caution as African swine fever (ASF) continues to spread in China and other parts of Asia. World Pork Expo, held each June at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines, hosts approximately 20,000 visitors over three days, including individuals and exhibitors from ASF-positive regions.  African swine fever affects only pigs and presents no human health or food safety risks. There is currently no vaccine to treat the swine disease.

 

"While an evaluation by veterinarians and other third-party experts concluded negligible risk associated with holding the event, we have decided to exercise extreme caution," said David Herring, NPPC president and a producer from Lillington, North Carolina. "The health of the U.S. swine herd is paramount; the livelihoods of our producers depend on it. Prevention is our only defense against ASF and NPPC will continue to do all it can to prevent its spread to the United States."

 

The decision to cancel this year's World Pork Expo comes as more than 100 U.S pork producers gather in Washington this week to meet with their members of Congress during NPPC's Legislative Action Conference. To augment the USDA's efforts to protect the United States from ASF and other animal diseases, U.S. pork producers are asking Congress to appropriate funding for 600 new U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture inspectors to further strengthen our defenses against African swine fever.

 

"Our farmers are highly export dependent," Herring said. "An ASF outbreak would immediately close our export markets at a time when we are already facing serious trade headwinds. The retaliatory tariffs we currently face in some of our largest export markets due to trade disputes are among the factors that prompted a conservative decision regarding World Pork Expo. U.S. pork producers are already operating in very challenging financial conditions."

 

Herring added, "The widespread presence of African swine fever in China's swine herd, the world's largest by far, takes the threat of this swine disease to an entirely new level. We ask all producers, travelers and the general public to recognize the heightened risk since the first outbreak was reported in China last year and to heed biosecurity protocols in support of U.S. agriculture.

 

About ASF

 

African swine fever is a viral disease that causes high mortality in domestic and wild pigs.

 

It spreads through close contact with infected animals or their excretions, or through feeding

 

uncooked contaminated meat to susceptible pigs. African swine fever affects only pigs and presents no human health or food safety risks.

 

About World Pork Expo

 

Hosted by NPPC since 1987, World Pork Expo is the world's largest pork industry-specific trade show in the world. It brings together pork producers and other industry professional from around the world for three days of education, innovation and networking.

 

About U.S. Pork Production

 

U.S. pork producers today provide 26 billion pounds of safe, wholesome and nutritious meat protein to consumers worldwide. With annual sales of more than $20 billion, U.S. pork production generates an estimated $23 billion of personal income and $39 billion of gross national product and supports more than 500,000 jobs across the United States.

 

# # #

 

NPPC is the global voice for the U.S. pork industry, protecting the livelihoods of America's 60,000 pork producers, who abide by ethical principles in caring for their animals, in protecting the environment and public health and in providing safe, wholesome, nutritious pork products to consumers worldwide. For more information, visit www.nppc.org.

 

 

Live swine show to proceed despite World Pork Expo cancellation

NSR staff members along with the Certified Pedigree Swine and American Berkshire Association are working diligently to confirm event logistics and details for the live hog show.

 

Source: National Swine Registry

via National Hog Farmer - Apr 10, 2019

 

Following the National Pork Producers Council decision to cancel the 2019 World Pork Expo, the National Swine Registry has announced the live swine show will still be held June 2-8.

 

In a statement, the NSR said in anticipation of this decision, new event logistics and details had tentatively been established. NSR staff members along with the Certified Pedigree Swine and American Berkshire Association are working diligently to confirm event logistics and details for the live hog show.

 

The World Pork Expo Junior National, hosted by the National Junior Swine Association and Team Purebred, was slated to kick off Expo week. In its 16 years, the Expo Junior National has grown into one of the nation’s largest youth hog shows. Organizers report that 1,500 exhibitors from 32 states and 3,500 hogs were expected for this year’s show. The Junior National combines educational activities and certification programs, with swine judging, live-hog competitions and showmanship.

 

The open show, presented by the National Swine Registry, was scheduled for Friday, June 7 and features hundreds of crossbred and purebred boars and gilts from throughout the United States. A breeding stock sale was scheduled for Saturday morning, June 8...

 

more

https://www.nationalhogfarmer.com/agenda/live-swine-show-proceed-despite-world-pork-expo-cancellation

 

 

Risk of ASF Introduction Through U.S. Airports Increases

 

Dr. Paul Sundberg - Swine Health Information Center

Farmscape for April 10, 2019

 

A University of Minnesota analysis has shown the risk of ASF entering the United States by way of illegally imported meat through U.S. airports has increased by 183 percent since the spread of disease into China, East Asia, and Western Europe.

 

A Swine Health Information Center and the National Pork Board funded analysis conducted by the University of Minnesota examined the risk for introduction of African Swine Fever into the U.S. through pork smuggled in air passenger luggage.

 

Dr. Paul Sundberg, the Executive Director of the Swine Health Information Center, says the risk of introduction through U.S. airports has increased substantially.

 

Clip-Dr. Paul Sundberg-Swine Health Information Center:

 

There's essentially a 100 percent chance that there is contaminated meat being introduced into the airport at the U.S.

 

We now that's going on in Japan and South Korea, in Australia and in Taiwan.

 

All of those countries have looked for virus in products they have confiscated at the airports and they've found that those products might be positive.

 

While the U.S. doesn't test products that are confiscated at the airports, the USDA assumes that all of those confiscations are positive.

 

We wanted to understand better the risk for those products being introduced into the airport and the risk for them to get through the airport.

 

That doesn't mean, however, that it would infect pigs.

 

There are multiple steps that this virus would have to get through.

 

First of all it would have to be on the airplane, secondly it would have to get through the airport, thirdly it would have to get to a spot where it's likely to be in contact with pigs and then the pigs would have to eat it and get infected, so there are multiple steps and what we wanted to understand was the level of risk for those different steps happening.

 

more

https://www.farmscape.com/f2ShowScript.aspx?i=26985&q=Risk+of+ASF+Introduction+Through+U.S.+Airports+Increases