In this file:

 

·         Area cattle operations hunkering down for second blizzard in less than a month

With last month's blizzard not even 30 days into the past, cattle operations in the Panhandle and eastern Wyoming are taking steps to get ready for another potential bomb cyclone…

 

·         Midwest braces itself for winter storm Wesley

Historical spring blizzard is expected to hit the Midwest in the upcoming days. Ranchers going through spring calving are preparing for the worst.

 

·         Yankton plans emergency routes for possible snow storm

... "We understand that people have to feed their cattle, and propane has to be delivered because people's homes have to be heated for cooking and heating and stuff like that. We get that, and we're not saying you can't do that, but just try to do it in a matter that you don't do any more damage to the roads," said Scherschligt...

 

 

Area cattle operations hunkering down for second blizzard in less than a month

 

By Spike Jordan, Scottsbluff Star-Herald (NE) 

Apr 9, 2019

 

SCOTTSBLUFF — Here it comes again.

 

With last month's blizzard not even 30 days into the past, cattle operations in the Panhandle and eastern Wyoming are taking steps to get ready for another potential bomb cyclone.

 

“When it comes to winter protection, a lot of it starts way out in advance,” Jack Arterburn, UNL Beef Systems Extension educator for the northern Panhandle said.

 

“The first thing that I think about are shelter belts, but there are also artificial protection that people will put in like covered panels.”

 

One example was excess rubber from tire stock tanks, which Arterburn said can be re-purposed into permanent or temporary windbreaks.

 

“Anything that provides protection from the wind will help,” he said. “Cold and wet is bad enough, but you add wind to it and it really takes things downhill fast.”

 

A wet hair coat raises the lower critical temperature at which cattle experience cold stress from a temperature of 19 degrees Fahrenheit to 59 degrees, according to a paper from UNL Beef Watch. A higher critical temperature means that cattle have to use more energy to maintain their body temperature and creates a situation where often the cattle just can’t eat enough to meet their energy requirements. As a result, they begin to use body fat reserves. And if those reserves become depleted, the animal will not be able to maintain body temperature and will die.

 

With much of the ground still muddy, the added rain and snow will make dry bedding another important consideration, Arterburn said.

 

“Giving cattle somewhere dry to lie down and trying to keep them from getting caked up with mud is the key,” he said. “Putting down some straw or some old hay just for bedding gives them a dry place to lie down and stay warm.”

 

Calves that are more than a few weeks old are slightly more resilient than newborns, but the cold and the rain can be tough on them just the same.

 

“I worry about the ones that are just a couple days or a week old,” Arterburn said. “The people who are calving right now, if they have a baby drop in the middle of the storm, you have to get them up, get them dry and get them to suck right away, otherwise you’ll have problems.”

 

For cow/calf operations, flooding has covered creek and river bottoms where the first spring grasses typically emerge. The lingering mud also complicates feeding bales, making it harder on equipment in need of maintenance.

 

“Things will take longer, and things will probably be breaking down if they haven’t already,” he said. “A lot of the times, with a storm like this people will feed extra, so it will take more time to accomplish that.”

 

At Dinklage Feed Yards just east of Torrington, Wyoming, Operations Manager Rondel Carman said he and his crew are getting prepared.

 

“We’re making sure we have plenty of supply of feed on hand — raw ingredients, hay and corn — stuff that we receive every day,” Carman said. “We typically go to what we call a storm ration, so we back off the energy of the ration a little bit and put some extra roughage in.”

 

Cold weather disrupts the eating patterns of cattle. Animals exposed to severe cold also increases their body temperature and metabolic rate.

 

Equipment-wise...

 

more

https://www.starherald.com/news/local_news/area-cattle-operations-hunkering-down-for-second-blizzard-in-less/article_c5a63d30-6402-5928-a3fc-8db312adc4a2.html

 

 

Midwest braces itself for winter storm Wesley

Historical spring blizzard is expected to hit the Midwest in the upcoming days. Ranchers going through spring calving are preparing for the worst.

 

Amanda Radke, BEEF Magazine 

Apr 09, 2019

 

Monday, we enjoyed some beautiful spring weather in South Dakota. With sunny skies, we had the entire family outside to play and catch up on some yard work. For the first time in months, no coats were required. It was amazing!

 

Tuesday, as I type this, the skies are gray, the air is getting crisp and the first droplets of rain are beginning to fall from the sky.

 

And in the next couple of days, we are expected to receive anywhere from 18-24 inches of snow. The thought of that much moisture piling up on top of the mud we have accumulated from a long and wet winter makes me physically ill.

 

As I write this, I have a pit in my stomach. This is all too familiar to the Xanto blizzard from 2018. When I start to think about how we can keep our spring-born calves safe and sound, it’s hard not to feel stressed out and nervous about what’s to come.

 

The average age of the American rancher today is 58 years old and climbing. Many were hit hard last year with a horrible, long-lasting winter. Let's face it, trudging through the snow and mud as you near retirement age is tough. And if these folks weathered through the heartache and economic losses brought on my a difficult 2018, getting hit again with a similar situation one year later could be the final nail on the coffin for these cow-calf operations.

 

They’re calling the upcoming blizzard "winter storm Wesley," and from the weather reports, it’s going to be a big one.

 

The outlook is grim, and I think it’s important to reiterate two things here.

 

First, no calf is worth the loss of human life. If the situation is dangerous, stay inside. As hard as it is, let it go. Your safety comes first, so don’t get yourself killed trying to be a hero in the upcoming storm. Do what you can to prepare. Use common sense. And then give it up to God.

 

Second, producers are currently facing challenging economic times. The financial stress combined with pressures to keep the family business afloat while also navigating through the devastating impacts of floods, blizzards and other devastating weather like wildfires can create an overwhelming situation that leaves ranching families feeling hopeless, depressed and plagued with anxiety.

 

If you are experiencing any of these feelings, please reach out and get help.

 

Heather Gessner, South Dakota State University Extension livestock business management field specialist shares this information on her Facebook page, “When we have a calf death loss problem, we go to the experts at the Animal Diagnostic Lab. When we have a problem with corn yields, we go to the soil fertility experts at the Co-op...

 

more, including links

https://www.beefmagazine.com/farm-life/midwest-braces-itself-winter-storm-wesley

 

 

Yankton plans emergency routes for possible snow storm

Damaged gravel roads making commutes difficult for travelers

 

By: Tasia Nevilles, KCAU/SiouxlandProud.com (IA)

Apr 09, 2019

 

YANKTON, South Dakota (KCAU) - SIOUX CITY, Iowa (KCAU) –  The City of Yankton is meeting with emergency responders tomorrow to map out the roads that are safe for emergency travel during the upcoming snow storm. It's a difficult task because many gravel roads are still closed.

 

Paul Scherschligt, Yankton county's emergency manager, explained his concern for drivers who live near damaged roads.

 

"We understand that people have to feed their cattle, and propane has to be delivered because people's homes have to be heated for cooking and heating and stuff like that. We get that, and we're not saying you can't do that, but just try to do it in a matter that you don't do any more damage to the roads," said Scherschligt.

 

Right now, Yankton is asking drivers to stay off all of the closed roads but the detours are affecting people like Louie Volin, who owns a gravel company and travels those roads often.

 

"It has impacted us because my company paves five towns and the roads have turned in to marshmallow cream. The more you try to do, the worse it gets," said Volin.

 

Scherschligt said right now, they can't make many of the needed repairs but they are working on several strategies that will...

 

more

https://www.siouxlandproud.com/news/local-news/yankton-plans-emergency-routes-for-possible-snow-storm/1912985128