… The bomb cyclone lived up to the hype... ... about a foot and a half of snow... the wind made for a much nastier day than those numbers might suggest... it’s calving season and high winds are dangerous for livestock… When the wind’s blowing that hard… it’s hard for people to move around to ensure livestock are fed and protected... There are more than 50,000 cattle on ranchlands… and thousands more in feedlots... 

 

 

Bomb Cyclone Wasn't Hype. It Closed Front Range Roads, Runways And Just About Everything Else

 

By Colorado Public Radio (CPR)

Mar 13, 2019

 

The bomb cyclone lived up to the hype.

 

About 4-5 inches of snow fell in the metro area, with much higher snowfalls in the foothills, including about a foot and a half of snow in Nederland, according to the National Weather Service. But the wind made for a much nastier day than those numbers might suggest.

 

NWS meteorologist Kari Bowen's office in Boulder tweeted that the blizzard was the equivalent of a Category 1 hurricane, along with the warning "DO NOT EVEN ATTEMPT TO DRIVE IN THIS STORM!"

 

But some did.

 

A Colorado State Trooper was killed while responding to a vehicle that slid off Interstate 76 in Weld County. Colorado State Patrol said in a press release that Cpl. Daniel Groves, 52, died after being hit by another driver who lost control of his vehicle. That case is under investigation by the state patrol.

 

Storm conditions — and accidents — caused closures on many major roadways, including on Interstate 25, I-76, U.S. 36, U.S. 287 and U.S. 85.

 

The weather also closed all runways at Denver International Airport and canceled the vast majority of the day's flights. At one point, Xcel reported more than 200,000 customers without power, saying many customers could be without power all night.

 

Gov. Jared Polis declared an emergency Wednesday afternoon because of the storm's severity and activated the Colorado National Guard to coordinate with other state agencies in rescuing stranded motorists.

 

“This is truly a statewide event,” said Tamara Rollison, a spokeswoman for the Colorado Department of Transportation in the metro area and central Colorado...

 

The extreme weather on the plains meant trouble for livestock.

 

On the Eastern Plains in Morgan County, ranchers have been preparing for the storm for days, according to Marlin Eisenach, a livestock agent for the Colorado State University extension service.

 

“Ranchers have gathered up cattle that were out further in the pasture and (they’ve been) bringing them closer to the house and the barn,” Eisenach said.

 

But it’s calving season and high winds are dangerous for livestock, he said. When the wind’s blowing that hard, he said, it’s hard for people to move around to ensure livestock are fed and protected.

 

“That’s something we take very seriously,” Eisenach said.

 

There are more than 50,000 cattle on ranchlands and at dairies in the county, and thousands more in feedlots, he said. There are also sheep, horses and other animals.

 

And, of course, we're not out of the woods yet ...

 

more, including links  

https://www.cpr.org/news/story/bomb-cyclone-colorado-is-closed