At SXSW this year, Walmart bills itself as a tech company

 

Walmart's chief technology officer, Jeremy King, is taking the stage at SXSW this year.

King will walk audience members through the latest technology like virtual reality headsets and machine-learning-powered robots Walmart is using in stores.

Walmart is billing itself as a tech company, as it narrows its gap with Amazon online.

 

Lauren Thomas, CNBC

Mar 10, 2019

 

South by Southwest isn't just about music, film and other media entertainment. The biggest retailer in the world will be at SXSW in Austin this year, selling itself as a tech company.

 

Walmart's chief technology officer, Jeremy King, is taking the stage at the annual conference to walk audience members through the latest technology like virtual reality headsets and machine-learning-powered robots it's using in stores to get online grocery orders to customers as quickly as possible.

 

Since its inception in Arkansas in 1962, Walmart has arguably struggled to fit the bill as a "modern" retailer. Many consumers still think about the company's Southern roots, its everyday low prices and warehouse-like store formats, when they think of Walmart. Meanwhile, Walmart's biggest competitor, Amazon, is gobbling up U.S. e-commerce sales as it innovates with tech like its Alexa-enabled Echo devices, where consumers can shop just using their voice. That's about as "modern" as a retailer can get.

 

"One of the hardest parts [about my job] ... people all have their own perceptions of Walmart," King told CNBC, ahead of his panel at SXSW, about his role leading Walmart Labs, the retailer's technology arm that powers its stores and e-commerce business today.

 

"For years now ... I've wanted people to understand we are building a tech organization," he said. "I've got a machine learning team. We have some of the best apps in the world."

 

King says Walmart isn't just adding technology to stores "for tech's sake." But gadgets like shelf-scanning robots are actually cutting down the time associates spend running around the floors of stores, freeing them up to talk with customers. The right machine learning can help Walmart's so-called category specialists it's said it plans to hire roughly 2,000 such people to monitor stock levels in stores and online find a single box of Cheerios cereal sitting on a truck before it gets to one of the retailer's distribution centers, he said.

 

"Everything is so real time," King explained. "We can react to [out-of-stocks] instantly. Change an order on the fly and the warehouse can send the order ... where before it could take a week."

 

In its latest quarter, Walmart's e-commerce sales surged 43 percent. In 2018...

 

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