In this file:

 

·         Cartels Are Making Americans Living Near The Border Afraid To Report Crimes

… “I turned in 700 pounds [of marijuana] up here … I called it in [to Border Patrol]. They went and got it. That night, [the smugglers] came back. They … broke off all the floats off my troughs — chopped ’em up, drained all of it,” Billy Darnell, a cattle rancher in New Mexico, explained to the Washington Examiner… 

 

·         GALLUP: Solid Majority Still Opposes New Construction on Border Wall

60% oppose significant new construction on border walls

 

·         Farmers Beat Steady Drum Of Support For Trump

… “The president has made controlling the border, securing the border and the ill effects of what happens when you don't control the border, a very big issue, and I think farmers and rural Americans support and agree with that”… 

 

 

Cartels Are Making Americans Living Near The Border Afraid To Report Crimes

 

Jason Hopkins, The Daily Caller

02/04/2019

 

U.S. residents living near the southern border claim they are afraid to report immigration-related crimes to the police, detailing horrific stories of retaliation by Mexican cartels.

 

“I turned in 700 pounds [of marijuana] up here … I called it in [to Border Patrol]. They went and got it. That night, [the smugglers] came back. They … broke off all the floats off my troughs — chopped ’em up, drained all of it,” Billy Darnell, a cattle rancher in New Mexico, explained to the Washington Examiner.

 

Unlike other residents in the area, Darnell alerts the Border Patrol and local authorities whenever he sees an incident. However, the Hidalgo County cattle ranger says he has paid the price for talking.

 

Drug smugglers working for the cartels are constantly crossing the U.S-Mexico border, carrying marijuana and other illicit narcotics with them. Many times, smugglers will camp out and make use of property on the U.S. side of the border, clashing with American ranchers and residents.

 

After reaching out to residents living near the area, several told the Washington Examiner that reporting immigration-related crimes — such as burglary or finding drugs near their property — to the police can lead to retaliation. Fearing retribution, many of them forgo calling authorities altogether.

 

“I mix and mingle with these folks a lot,” said Joel Edwards, a Hidalgo County commissioner who said ranchers’ fears of retaliation by the cartels are legitimate. “That’s pretty much a real common feeling out there … I’ve heard it quite a bit in the last few weeks. They’re just scared.”

 

Another resident, Tricia Elbrock, believes cartel spotters camp out in the hills that overlook her home in Animas, New Mexico, and would know if she attempted to report suspicious activity. Elbrock has reported finding semiautomatic rifles, cellphones and satellite phones. However, she said she never approaches anything that is left on her property because people watching “could pick us off with a rifle.”

 

News of resident anxiety comes as lawmakers in Congress continue to debate border security and possible construction of a massive border wall.

 

After undergoing the longest shutdown in U.S. history, President Donald Trump relented and allowed the federal government to reopen in late January. However, Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill have until Feb. 15 to reach an agreement or else face another shutdown. It’s not clear if Democrats will allow a comprehensive deal on border security to include funding for a border wall...

 

more 

https://dailycaller.com/2019/02/04/border-residents-migrant-crimes/

 

 

Solid Majority Still Opposes New Construction on Border Wall

 

60% oppose significant new construction on border walls

57% opposed it in June, as the issue heated up ahead of midterm elections

81% support a path to citizenship for immigrants in the U.S. illegally

 

By Jim Norman, GALLUP

February 4, 2019

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Sixty percent of Americans oppose major new construction of walls along the U.S.-Mexico border -- the goal behind President Donald Trump's budget showdown with Democratic leaders that led to a record 35-day partial shutdown of the federal government.

 

The shutdown, which ended Jan. 25, and the political battles that preceded it over the past several months have had little apparent effect on public opinion about a wall. Fifty-seven percent opposed major new construction of walls seven months ago, a statistically insignificant three-percentage-point difference from the current number.

 

Gallup trends offer several signs that immigration has risen in prominence as a national issue in the past year:

 

·         Twenty-one percent now name it as the country's most important problem. That is the second-highest total for immigration in the 80-year history of the question, behind last July's 22%.

 

·         Seventy-eight percent in November identified immigration as an extremely or very important issue to them in the midterm elections, ranking it among the top three issues in importance to the public.

 

·         Perhaps as a result of the heightened political attention given to the issue of immigration, the percentage saying they feel strongly one way or another about expanding the walls has increased since last June's poll -- from 58% to 65%. More of that increase has come in strong opposition (five points) than in strong support (two points).

 

The issue of a wall was proposed as a way to slow illegal immigration long before Trump made it his signature 2016 campaign pledge. Gallup has asked about it using various question wordings, but all polls have shown a majority opposed. Gallup first asked about it in 1993, when 71% said they opposed "erecting a wall along the border with Mexico." Opposition eased slightly in 1995, when 62% were against erecting a wall. In 2006, opposition to "building a wall along the border with Mexico" was 56%.

 

Public opposition to a border wall had increased by 2016, when Trump was pushing construction of the wall. Sixty-six percent opposed "building a wall along the entire U.S.-Mexico border" in June of that year.

 

The current poll was conducted Jan. 21-27; slightly more than two-thirds of the respondents (69%) were interviewed before Trump ended the shutdown. There is no significant difference in views of the wall between those interviewed during the shutdown and those interviewed after it.

 

Public Supports Path to Citizenship, More Border Patrol Agents ...

 

Bottom Line ...

 

more, including table, chart, links  

https://news.gallup.com/poll/246455/solid-majority-opposes-new-construction-border-wall.aspx

 

 

Farmers Beat Steady Drum Of Support For Trump

 

By Rhonda Brooks, Editor, Farm Journal Magazine, Editorial Director, Farm Journal Media

via AgWeb - February 5, 2019

 

Farmer support for President Donald Trump is holding steady to nudging slightly higher than it was a month ago, according to the latest Farm Journal Pulse.

 

Seventy-eight percent of the 1,043 farmers and ranchers who weighed-in on the end-of-January poll say they strongly approve or somewhat approve of the way President Trump is conducting his job. Only 20% say they disapprove of Trump’s handling of his job. Two percent were not sure.

 

The poll is the second in a series to track sentiment on the president’s job performance amongst farmers, ranchers and agribusiness.

 

Trump’s high approval rating in January is statistically no different than the 76% approval rating he received from the agriculture industry in December. However, it does reaffirm how strongly the ag community continues to support the president and his policies.

 

Randy Russell, The Russell Group, attributes the ag community’s continued high marks for Trump to a couple of reasons.

 

“The president has made controlling the border, securing the border and the ill effects of what happens when you don't control the border, a very big issue, and I think farmers and rural Americans support and agree with that,” Russell says.

 

“(Second), the Chinese have been stealing our intellectual property and forcing companies to transfer technology to them (for years). We're at a pivotal point in terms of those kinds of issues, and for the first time we’ve got a president who’s trying to do something about it. Farmers may not agree with every tactic he uses or with everything he says but, by God, they support what he's trying to accomplish.”

 

Trade efforts find traction. Reuters reports China purchased at least 1 million metric tons of soybeans from the U.S. on Friday. U.S. negotiators are expected to visit China for another round of discussions sometime in mid-February. Based on those positives, Russell anticipates farmers’ approval of Trump will only strengthen during the next few weeks.

 

“If progress with China goes like we think it's going to at this point, it'll be a very positive development,” Russell says...

 

more

https://www.agweb.com/article/farmers-beat-steady-drum-of-support-for-trump/